SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.

The editor of Log book will retire this coming August and, unless a new one comes forward, the society will close.
With this in mind, we are not taking in any new members.
This is an unfortunate situation but seemingly unavoidable.

CHRISTIANA, JOMFRUEN and ATLANTIC SUN

Norway issued in 2008 a series of stamp for tourism in the country, two have a maritime theme.

So far I know the small vessels on this stamp of Oslo Harbour with in the background the City Hall have not been identified, in the last Watercraft Philately of Nov/Dec 2018 in an article by Dan Rodlie he gives the names and details of the three vessels on this stamp as, from the left to the right as CHRISTIANIA, JOMFRUEN and the ATLANTIC SUN.

The Oslo City Hall is the political and administrative heart of the city. It has an important place in the history of Norwegian art and architecture and is visited by more than 100,000 guests and tourists every year. Its two towers, best seen from the sea, stand 66 and 63 metres high. The bells on the top of the east tower provide pleasure for many people, as they play tunes every hour on the hour from 7 am to 12 pm each day.

On the stamp of Lyngor Lighthouse, the sail yacht is not identified, maybe one of the readers has a name for the yacht?
In the days of sailing ships, Lyngor was one of the most important harbours on the Skagerrak coast. It is now a popular place for holidays. Narrow, cemented paths, flanked by white picket fences, wind their way over these vehicle-free islands. Boats are the only means of transport in this South Norwegian Venice.
When Lyngor Lighthouse was finished in 1879, householders in Lyngor celebrated the event by putting lights in their windows. It had been touch and go whether the lighthouse would be built. The authorities had not recommended it, but men from the region with money and good contacts in the Storting took action and produced results. Today we call that lobbying!

CHRISTIANIA:
Built as wooden 3 mast fore-and aft schooner (borgåskute) by Paul Grünquist & Co shipyard in Valax, Finland
Launched as HELGA
Tonnage 143 gross, 85 net, 230 dwt, dim. ? x 24.5 x 9.10ft
Auxiliary oil engine hp?
1948 Delivered to owners.

Lloyds Registry 1955/56 gives for the HELGA as owner Gustaf Holmberg, at Borgå, Finland. Most probably he was also the owner when built.
1994 Sold to Norway Yacht Charter A/A, Oslo and renamed CHRISTIANIA (the former name of Oslo) and restored in her original condition.
Tonnage 123 gross, 38 net, dim. 45.70 x 7.45 x 2.61m, (draught), length of hull 33.20m
Sail area 550 square meters. 10 sails.
Auxiliary engine Caterpillar 6-cyl. diesel, 365 hp.
Crew 5-9, day passengers 150.
Used as a passenger sailing ship in the charter business around Oslo Fjord. When not in use moored in front of the Oslo City Hall.
2019 In service.

JOMFRUEN:
Built as a motor cutter BRILLIANT in Hardanger on the west coast of Norway in 1917.
For many years she carried mackerel from ports around Bergen and Stavanger to the fishmarket in Oslo.
On her return voyages from Oslo she hauled cement from Slemmestad outside Oslo to the west coast of Norway. She continued trading mainly along the western Norwegian coastline until 1984.
From 1984 in spring of 1988 she was converted into a passenger sailing vessel and used as a party-ship and for social activities based in Oslo.
Tonnage 49 Gt, 19net, dim. 1970 x 5.30 x 2.60m. (draught)
Accommodation for 65 passengers.
Her name was at one time changed to BLÅVEIS until she was renamed JOMFRUEN in 2000.
2019 Owned by Norway Yacht Charter A/s, Oslo and in active service.

ATLANTIC SUN:
1994 Built as a passenger vessel by the Porsgrunn Maskineringssenter in Porsgrunn, Norway for the Atlantic Boat Ltd. AS, Oslo.
Tonnage 118 grt, 48 net, dim. 24.10 x 6.16 x 1.60m.
Powered by two General Motors engines.
Delivered under the name ATLANTIC SUN.

She has been used in the tourist traffic on the Oslo Fjord.
2019 In service, sane name and owner, IMO No 9068108.

Source: http://www.philatelism.com/details.php?issueid=2295
Otmar Schäuffelen, Die letzten grossen Segelschiffe; Various Norwe-gian Illustrated Shipping registry; http://www.tallship-fan.de/index_e.htm; D. Rodlie. Lloyds Register 1955/56

Norway 2008 7Kr. sg?, scott 1542

CARAVEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION COLUMBUS 1492

Of the many stamps and miniature sheets used for the 500th anniversary that Columbus discovered America, most of this stamps and miniature sheet have almost all the same design, only the miniature sheet issued by the Bahamas in 1990 is quite different.

The image is a woodcut from the book “Liber Chronicarum” of the chronicler Hartmann Schedel (1414-1514).

The book describe the Latin world history from the creation till the year 1493.
The book of 650 pages was printed in 1493 by Anton Koberger in Nürenberg. A German translation made by S. Alt is published in the same year.

The 645 (in a other edition over the 1000) woodcuts were made by Michel Wohlgemut (1437-1519) and Wilhelm Pleydenwurff (1462-1494).
On the miniature sheet of the Bahamas is depict the building of Noah’s Ark, the part with the Latin text is omitted.

If we pay attention to the following.
Columbus discovered Cuba on 28 October 1492, he returned to Spain were her arrived on 15 March 1493. At that time the chronicle of Hartmann Schedels was already by the printer, so this woodcut can’t represent the vessel of Columbus.
So this image can’t document the journey of Columbus.
The Post of the Bahamas is free to illustrate the life of Columbus with the Ark of Noah, if the image of the Ark is a caravel.

The artist who made this woodcut went into the wrong when he took a caravel as an example for the construction of Noah's Ark, and did not portray the Ark as a square box as most artists from that time portray the Ark.

This woodcut was made in the time of Columbus, while the miniature sheet has the imprint of a “Caravel under construction”. That the picture of the construction of a caravel fits in with the time of Columbus, and is therefore not from the time of the Arch of Noah.

So anyhow a good design of the Bahamas Post.

Source: Translated from Navicula.
Bahamas 1990 $1.50 sgMS 874, scott 692

DORIS

Guyana issued in 2018 two miniature sheets for “Fishing in Guyana”, the fishing boat depict in the border of the MS shows us fishing boats pulled on the beach. The fish most probably you can find in the Guyana waters but the depicted fishing boats have never seen this waters.
She are taken from a painting made by the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh in 1888 and show “Fishing boats on the beach at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer in South France, the original you can find in the van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

The fishing boats depict are “doris” of which Aak to Zumbra gives: The French doris was originally carried on board “morutiers and “terreneuviers” and she is till today used for fishing inshore, gathering seaweed, and collecting sand. Locally modified to meet special conditions and type of use.
Some half-decked; others a raised cabin forward. Double tholepins used when rowing. Various rigs employed; ketch, cutter, sloop, spirit, lug, lateen. Now most used an outboard motor or inboard motor, and may be constructed of aluminium and she have a pilot house.

(the depicted boats are made of wood.)
Reported length 3.2 – 7m.; e.g. length 7m, beam 2.2m, depth 1.0m.

Turkey 1990 700li sg3090, scott 2482.
Guyana 2018 $16 and $8.50 sgMS?, scott?

VIKING LONGSHIP and Isle of Man

The Isle of Man issued in 1989 four stamps and a miniature sheet that the island was under the Vikings influence.
21p show a figurehead of a Viking ship.
25p shows a Viking warship from ahead at sea.
31p shows a Viking warship it looks sitting on the beach.
75p show the prow of a Viking ship.
£1.00 The MS shows also a prow of a Viking ship entering a port.

More on the Viking ships is given on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10360&p=19116&hilit=viking+longship#p19116
Wikipedia has on this time of the Viking Age and Norse kingdom at Isle of Man.

Kingdom of the Isles
The period of Scandinavian domination is divided into two main epochs – before and after the conquest of Mann by Godred Crovan in 1079. Warfare and unsettled rule characterize the earlier epoch; the later saw comparatively more peace.
Between about AD 800 and 815 the Vikings came to Mann chiefly for plunder; between about 850 and 990, when they settled there, the island fell under the rule of the Scandinavian Kings of Dublin; and between 990 and 1079, it became subject to the powerful Earls of Orkney.
There was a mint producing coins on Mann between c. 1025 and c. 1065. These Manx coins were minted from an imported type 2 Hiberno-Norse penny die from Dublin. Hiberno-Norse coins were first minted under Sihtric, King of Dublin. This illustrates that Mann may have been under the thumb of Dublin at this time.
The conqueror Godred Crovan was evidently a remarkable man, though little is known about him. According to the Chronicon Manniae he subdued Dublin, and a great part of Leinster, and held the Scots in such subjection that supposedly no one who set out to build a vessel dared to insert more than three bolts. The memory of such a ruler would be likely to survive in tradition, and it seems probable therefore that he is the person commemorated in Manx legend under the name of King Gorse or Orry. He created the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles in around 1079; it included the south-western islands of Scotland until 1164, when two separate kingdoms were formed from it. In 1154, what was later to be known as the Diocese of Sodor and Man was formed by the Catholic Church.
The islands which were under his rule were called the Suðr-eyjar (south isles, in contradistinction to the Norðr-eyjar, or the "north isles", i.e. Orkney and Shetland), and they consisted of the Hebrides, and of all the smaller western islands of Scotland, and Mann. At a later date his successors took the title of Rex Manniae et Insularum (King of Mann and of the Isles). The kingdom's capital was on St Patrick's Isle, where Peel Castle was built on the site of a Celtic monastery.
Olaf, Godred's son, exercised considerable power, and according to the Chronicle, maintained such close alliance with the kings of Ireland and Scotland that no one ventured to disturb the Isles during his time (1113–1152). In 1156, his son, Godred (reigned 1153–1158), who for a short period ruled over Dublin also, lost the smaller islands off the coast of Argyll as a result of a quarrel with Somerled (the ruler of Argyll). An independent sovereignty thus appeared between [clarification needed] the two divisions of his kingdom.
In the 1130s the Catholic Church sent a small mission to establish the first bishopric on the Isle of Man, and appointed Wimund as the first bishop. He soon afterwards embarked with a band of followers on a career of murder and looting throughout Scotland and the surrounding islands.
During the whole of the Scandinavian period, the Isles remained nominally under the suzerainty of the Kings of Norway, but the Norwegians only occasionally asserted it with any vigour. The first such king to assert control over the region was likely Magnus Barelegs, at the turn of the 12th century. It was not until Hakon Hakonarson's 1263 expedition that another king returned to the Isles.

Decline of Norse rule.
From the middle of the 12th century until 1217 the suzerainty had remained of a very shadowy character; Norway had become a prey to civil dissensions. But after that date it became a reality, and Norway consequently came into collision with the growing power of the kingdom of Scotland.
Early in the 13th century, when Ragnald (reigned 1187–1229) paid homage to King John of England (reigned 1199–1216), we hear for the first time of English intervention in the affairs of Mann. But a period of Scots domination would precede the establishment of full English control.
Finally, in 1261, Alexander III of Scotland sent envoys to Norway to negotiate for the cession of the isles, but their efforts led to no result. He therefore initiated a war, which ended in the indecisive Battle of Largs against the Norwegian fleet in 1263. However, the Norwegian king Haakon Haakonsson died the following winter, and this allowed King Alexander to bring the war to a successful conclusion. Magnus Olafsson, King of Mann and the Isles (reigned 1252–1265), who had campaigned on the Norwegian side, had to surrender all the islands over which he had ruled, except Mann, for which he did homage. Two years later Magnus died and in 1266 King Magnus VI of Norway ceded the islands, including Mann, to Scotland in the Treaty of Perth in consideration of the sum of 4,000 marks (known as merks in Scotland) and an annuity of 100 marks. But Scotland's rule over Mann did not become firmly established till 1275, when the Manx suffered defeat in the decisive Battle of Ronaldsway, near Castletown.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_o ... sle_of_Man
Isle of Man 1998 21p/75p sg 793/798 and ms 797, scott 771/775.

TRIESTE LAUNCH

Uruguay issued in 2016 a miniature sheet for the 100th Anniversary of the Naval Oceanographic Office. On the stamp of 20p is depict the Casona Antonio Lussich, the main building of SOHMA, in the border of the sheet, on the right the shield of SHOMA and on the left the hydrographic launch TRIESTE.
I got from Mr. Erhard Jung the following information on the TRIESTE.
Built as a hydrographic launch by the yard of Massimo Petronio, Trieste, Italy for the Uruguay Navy.
Displacement 13.6 ton, dim. 13.50 x 3.30 x 0,90m.(draught)
Powered by2 Volvo Penta TAMD 42 diesel engines, with KaMeWa K 25 Hydrojet thrusters, speed 16 knots.
Range 550 mile by a speed of 14 knots.
Crew 4
12 March 2001 commissioned at Montevideo.as TRIESTE.

The TRIESTE hydrographic launch is, together with the OYARVIDE (ROU 22), one of the two vessels of the Navy of Uruguay specifically built for the bathymetric survey in Uruguayan waters. The crew consists of trained personnel for navigation and maintenance, while the appropriate personnel in hydrography in which she operates (usually composed of an Official Hydrographer and between two to three crew members), embarks on the occasion of carrying out the works, coming from the Service of Oceanography, Hydrography and Meteorology of the Navy (SOHMA). Its base port is the Marina of Santa Lucía, in front of Santiago Vázquez.

Construction and incorporation
The TRIESTE was built on the Massimo Petronio shipyards, Trieste, in northern Italy, built to carry out bathymetric survey tasks in fluvial and coastal waters, with modern equipment and complying with the standards of the International Hydrographic Organization. (IHO).
On 13 March 2001, in the presence of the then President of the Republic , Dr. Jorge Batlle Ibañez , the President of Italy , Carlo Azeglio Ciampi , Commanders in Chief of the Armed Forces of both countries and various national and foreign authorities, the delivery ceremony of the Hydrographic vessel granted by the International Maritime Academy of Trieste took place in the Port of Montevideo , named TRIESTE in its honor of the building place, the Uruguay flag was already hoisted one day before.
The delivery of the vessel responded to the "Agreement of formation for the fluviomarítima security", signed by Uruguay with the European Union , being destined to the support of the tasks of the hydrographic ship OYARVIDE (ROU 22) in the layout of the denominated "Safe Water Lanes" that would connect the high seas with the ports in that area. Assuring the non-existence of obstacles of navigation. The width of the lanes is six nautical miles and will increase in some important sections.

Characteristics and capabilities
The TRIESTE belongs to Class 100 A / 1.1 NAV.S.ST, the same being the first construction in its series. Its propulsion is by means of two Hydrojet Motors, which avoids the presence of appendices in the submerged part of the ship, thus facilitating both the navigation in shallow waters and the launching and recovery operations at sea of the instruments; also significantly reduces vibrations on board, increasing comfort for the crew and long-levity equipment. In this way an excellent maritime capacity with optimum propulsive performance is ensured.
The ship is capable of operating in coastal waters, within twenty miles off the coast, with an range of 550 nautical miles at continuous cruising speed of 14 knots, with a maximum speed of 16 knots. The hull is subdivided into 5 watertight areas; the form of the living quarters derives from the experience acquired in the projects and in the construction of units for heavy uses, assuring to this type of unit remarkable operational advantages and high safety in navigation. In order to accommodate 4 crew members, it has a cabin with a U-shaped sofa that can be transformed into two bunks, plus two folding bunk beds. It also has a bathroom and a small kitchen.

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lancha_hi ... ca_Trieste
Uruguay 2016 20p sgMS?, scott?

Tristan - 500th anniversary of the discovery Part II.

30р-ТHОМАS SWAIN 1774-1862г-. see more viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16107. 30р-HMS «CHALLENGER»1873г-. see more viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7384. 30р-REVEREND DODGSON ARRIVES 1881г. Edwin Heron Dodgson (30 June 1846 – 3 January 1918), a clergyman in the Church of England, He is primarily remembered for his work as a missionary in the island of Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic Ocean, the most remote human settlement in.In 1880 he was appointed by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG) as missionary and school teacher to Tristan da Cunha. The schooner «Edward Vittery» was chartered at a cost of £35 to take Dodgson from St Helena to Tristan. He landed safely on 25 February 1881. Unfortunately a gale sprang up and the boat was driven ashore and wrecked at a spot later named in honour of the occasion as «Down-Where-The-Minister-Land-His-Things», as it still appears on maps of the island. All of Dodgson's books (except 100 copies of the Mission Hymn Book), the harmonium, and most of his stores were lost, but the communion vessels were saved, as was a stone font. 50р-WRECK OF THE «ITALIA» 1892г-. see more viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5715. 80p- NORWEGIAN EXPEDITION 1937–38. Erling Christophersen (April 17, 1898 – November 9, 1994) was a Norwegian botanist, geographer and diplomat. He participated in and led several notable scientific expeditions in the 20th century, including the fifth Tanager Expedition (1924) to Nihoa and Necker Island and the Norwegian Scientific Expedition to Tristan da Cunha (1937–1938).The Norwegian Scientific Expedition to Tristan Da Cunha was a scientific and cultural exploration of the most remote inhabited archipelago in the world, in the south Atlantic Ocean, 2,000 km (1,200 mi) from the nearest inhabited land, Saint Helena. The expedition arrived on the island in December 1937 and left in March 1938. Captained by botanist Erling Christophersen, the thirteen man crew included three University of Oslo Ph.D. students conducting research for their dissertations, which were published shortly after their return. Based on observations made during the voyage, Christophersen published «Tristan da Cunha», «the Lonely Isle» (1938) and the comprehensive «Norwegian Scientific Expedition to Tristan Da Cunha, 1937-1938» (1945). 50р-HMS «МILFORD» 1938г-. see more viewtopic.php?f=2&t=6774.
Tristan_da_Cunha 2006;30р;30р;30р;50р;80р;50р.МS. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erling_Christophersen, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_Dodgson, http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Norwegian_Sc ... _1937-1938.
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Lady Elizabeth

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Lady Elizabeth

Postby john sefton » Tue Jun 15, 2010 7:37 pm

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SG417
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SG262.jpg
SG262
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The LADY ELIZABETH lies-beached at the eastern end of Stanley harbour at Whalebone Cove. She arrived in the Falklands on March 13th 1913, under the Norwegian flag, on voyage from Vancouver to Delagoa Bay with a cargo of lumber. She struck the Uranie Rock in the entrance to Berkley Sound to the north east of Stanley and was so badly damaged that after examination it was decided to dispose of her in the Falklands rather than stand the heavy cost of repairs. She served as a floating warehouse in the harbour for many years until she was put ashore in Whalebone Cove on the 17th February 1936.
She was built in 1879 at Sunderland by R. Thompson Jr. Her registered tonnage was 1208, her length 223ft. and her beam 35ft. During her life she changed hands several times; at one period owned by G.C. Karren and registered at Castletown in the Isle of Man. Her latest position 51deg41’36"S, 57deg48’17"W.
Log Book May 1982
Falkland Is SG417 Isle of Man SG262 MS264
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Re: Lady Elizabeth

Postby aukepalmhof » Sat May 04, 2013 9:25 pm

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2018 LADY ELIZABETH.jpg
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Built as an iron hulled bark under yard No 98 by Robert Thompson Jr., Sunderland bought on the stocks by John Wilson, London.
04 June 1879 launched under the name LADY ELIZABETH, she was named after a former ship of Wilson which was lost on a voyage from Fremantle to Shanghai, she grounded on Rottnest Island on 30 June 1878.
Tonnage 1,208 grt, 1,155 net., dim 67.97 x 10.67 x 6.52m.
21 August 1879 registered at London.

11 September 1879 sailed from North Shields for her maiden voyage under Captain Findley and a crew of 21 men, loaded with 1,760 ton of coal bound for Bombay, where she arrived on 30 January 1880.
After discharging on 10 March 1880 she left for Madras then to Cocanada before sailing for London. Arrived London on 30 October 1880 loaded with general cargo.
Her next voyage was from Middlesbrough and via Reunion and Mauritius to Galle in Ceylon then to Chittagong where she loaded (most probably rice), before sailing to Mauritius where she arrived on 13 March 1882.
22 April 1882 she left for a round charter voyage to Melbourne, Australia, arrived back in Mauritius on 15 October.
08 December 1882 she sailed from Mauritius bound for Bombay and Gopaulpore where she leaded 23,400 bales if rice.
06 November 1883 arrived in London.
03 April 1884 Robert Thompson was declared bankrupt, but before the LADY ELIZABETH was already sold by the mortgage holder the Merchant Banking Comp. to George Christian Karran.

The new owner who captained also the LADY ELIZABET used her in a liner service between the U.K. to Australia the next four voyages

• On 23 February 1884, The LADY ELIZABETH suffered substantial damage from a hurricane. She sustained damage to the front of the poop deck after it was stoved in. Many of her sails were lost or severely damaged. Despite the damage, the ship was able to make it to port in Sydney, Australia where six crew members jumped ship. Another death occurred on the voyage when William Leach fell from aloft and later died from his injuries. This was the third voyage under the command of Captain Karran.
• On 10 May 1890, Captain George Christian Karran stepped down as captain after six voyages and Captain H. C. Lever took command as the new captain of the LADY ELIZABETH
• In January 1906, The LADY ELIZABETH was sold to the Norwegian company "Skibasaktieselskabet" of Sundet, Boroen.
During Captain Julius Hoigh’s command of the ship, two crew members went missing after suffering from malarial fever. The LADY ELIZABETH left Callao, Peru with a crew that included several Finns on 26 September (year unknown, but between 1906 and 1913). Just after leaving port, one of the Finns named Granquiss became ill, which Captain Hoigh diagnosed as malarial fever. A few days later, another crewmember who was also a Finn named Haparanta also became ill with malarial fever. Another crew member also complained of feeling ill but not as severe. The captain prescribed some remedies to help the ill crew members and they were allowed to walk the deck for the fresh air. A short time later, around afternoon, Granquiss went missing and the crew were unable to locate him on the ship. Captain Hoigh came to the conclusion that the ill crew member must have deliberately jumped overboard, taking his own life and was not lost overboard due to the fine weather that day. Around 7:00 pm, Captain Hoigh discovered the other sick Finn crewmember was missing. A search turned up no evidence of him. It was concluded that the malaria had caused both men to become delirious and jump overboard. Captain Hoigh ordered the crew to keep close watch on the last man with the less severe fever. Captain Hoigh reported that there had not been any previous trouble with the other men. The LADY ELIZABETH eventually arrived at its destination Newcastle New South Wales and filed a report with authorities. A consul from Norway named H. C. Langwill held an official inquiry.
On 4 December 1912, The LADY ELIZABETH left Vancouver bound for Delagoa Bay Mozambique, with a shipment of lumber. The ship encountered severe weather halfway through the voyage and was damaged just off Cape Horn. Four crew members were lost overboard, along with the ships two boats and part of her deck cargo. She also sustained damage to the deck fittings, wheel, moorings, and other parts of the ship. Captain Hoigh ordered the ship to the nearest port for repairs. The LADY ELIZABETH altered course for Stanley, Falkland Islands. Fifteen miles outside Port Stanley, the LADY ELIZABETH struck Uraine Rock just off Volunteer Point and suffered a six-foot break in the hull and keel along with a foot long hole. The ship began to sink but was able to get to Port Stanley for repairs. After the ship was examined, the LADY ELIZABETH was condemned (declared unseaworthy) because of the damage.
In June 1913, she was condemned and converted into a coal hulk. She was sold to Crown Receiver of Wrecks, Falkland Islands for £1,000. The LADY ELIZABETH remained stationed there until 17 February 1936 when her mooring lines broke during a storm and she drifted to where she now lies in Whale Bone Cove in Stanley Harbour.
The LADY ELIZABETH is still intact and partially beached on Whale Bone Cove. The ship has been reported to rock back and forth during high tides from the pounding waves. Many of the ships accessories are still attached to the LADY ELIZABETH including the main crank for the anchor, the davits that would hold the two lifeboats, part of the crow's nest, part of the spiral staircase, and most of her wooden decking. However, most of the ship is suffering severe rust and the keel of the LADY ELIZABETH has started to rust away leaving large holes. During high tide, the bottom of the ship is flooded. There are still sections of paint on the inside of the ship. Some of the iron rivets have rusted away causing the starboard bulkhead to spring out.
In June 1984, the owner assessed the damage of the LADY ELIZABETH. Using original reports from the assessment made on the damage in 1913, they found the foot-long hole in the keel and reported that this was indeed the reason the ship would not stay afloat. However, if the LADY ELIZABETH was towed for repairs in dry-dock, she could possibly sail again. Unfortunately, there was no dry dock in Port Stanley in 1984. Since coming to rest in Whale Bone Cove, the poop deck quarters have been removed of all wood and vandalized. The rudder of the ship is still intact but showing severe corrosion and is turned to port with the steering gears still intact but also corroded. The ships wheel is missing. The original anchor has not been located; however, it is believed to be buried where the LADY ELIZABETH was used as a coal hulk. Plans were being made to salvage the LADY ELIZABETH by the Crown Receiver of Wrecks and convert her into floating museum. Due to lack of funding however, the project was never completed.
In the winter of 2008, the ship’s bowsprit broke during a storm. The Falkland Islands Museum & National Trust is currently discussing removing the bowsprit.
Isle of Man 1984 28p sg262, scott?. MSsg264 28p and 31p.
Falkland Islands 1982 5p sg417, scott? 2018 £1.22 sg?, scott?
Source: Wikipedia. Log Book
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Re: Lady Elizabeth

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Dec 21, 2018 7:50 pm

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Falkland Islands 2002, 40 p. StG.?
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