SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TRIREME

The stamp shows in the background a “trireme” : viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12113&p=16176&hilit=trireme#!lightbox[gallery]/5/

The Bosnia& Herzegovina Post gives the following by the stamp, most is about the Iris and noting about the depicted vessel.

About Myths and Flora 2007 - The Illyrian Iris in Myths

Perunika (Iris) was named after Perun – Slavic God of Thunder. Legend says that perunika would overgrow in the place that was touched by Perun’s lightning.
Many species of Iris grows in Herzegovina and Dalmatia: Iris illyrica, iris croatica, and Iris pseudopallida. Many antiques writers, such as Teofrast, Nicander and Plinius, mention it.

The root of perunika was used in medicine and in agriculture, but its biggest value was in perfumery. According to the Plinius, the odour of perunika was produced only by Greek cities such as Corint, who led in perfume manufacturing and exported it all over the Mediterranean, and Kizik. Hereof testimony many ceramic pots for perfumes – alabastron and aryballos. In the first fase, the perfume was in liquidity, but Corinthians were started to produce fixed perfume (Greek stymma, something like today’s cream). It was more economical for transport and it was prepared for special pots – pikside.
Many pots for perfumes were found in the field of Narona where, in the IV. century B.C, Greeks founded emporium (port) and established market place in the Neretva, on which boats and ships triere – trireme, were sailing.

Plinius Secundus, in his encyclopedia Naturalis historis writes: “Iris laudatissima in Illyrico, et ibi quoque non in maritimis, sed in silvestribus Drilonis et Naronae”. (Perunika from Illyrica is very praised, not those along the shore, but those in the woods along Drim and Neretva).

Bosnia& Herzegovina 2007 3.00KM sg?, scott?

DEPORTATION OF THE PEOPLE OF ST PIERRE et MIQUELON in 1793

The stamp issued in 1993 by St Pierre et Miquelon shows the people leaving by most probably fishing boats St Pierre et Miquelon after the British captured the island on 14 May 1793 and the people living there were deported. In the background of the stamp, the island is visible, and the people in the first boat are looking for the last time to the island.

The people of the island were deported to Magdalen Island in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.

St Pierre et Miquelon 1993 5f10 sg 698. Scott 591.
Source: Internet

HMS Diana (1794)

HMS Diana was a 38-gun Artois-class fifth rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1794. Because Diana served in the Royal Navy's Egyptian campaign between 8 March 1801 and 2 September, her officers and crew qualified for the clasp "Egypt" to the Naval General Service Medal that the Admiralty authorized in 1850 to all surviving claimants. Diana participated in an attack on a French frigate squadron anchored at Saint-Vaast-la-Hougue at the Action of 15 November 1810, which ultimately led to the destruction of the Elisa. (Boats from Diana went in and set fire to the beached Eliza despite heavy fire from shore batteries and three nearby armed brigs; the British suffered no casualties.) On 7 March 1815 Diana was sold to the Dutch navy for £36,796. On 27 August 1816 she was one of six Dutch frigates that participated in the bombardment of Algiers. Diana was destroyed in a fire on 16 January 1839 while in dry-dock at Willemsoord, Den Helder. The design stamp is made after painting of Tom Freeman.
Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Diana_(1794). Ivory Coast 2018;500f.

SOUTH AFRICAN PORTS

35c Walvis Bay Harbour:
This bay is on the west coast of South Africa was marked on Portuguese marine charts as early as 1487. The natural harbour was named Golfo de Santa Maria da Conceicao by Bartolomeu Dias. The Territory of Walvis Bay became a British possession in 1878, and in 1884 it was incorporated into the then Cape Colony.
Walvis Bay was formerly a whaling station. Originally the bay was too shallow for use by Ocean Steamers but it has systemically dredged and the first quay for passengers and cargo vessels was opened in 1927. Walvis Bay is the centre of the important fishing industry on the west coast and also handles the exporting of minerals from Namibia.

55c East London:
East London port is situated in the mouth of the Buffalo River. In 1835 the river was surveyed for a possible harbour for longboats to carry passengers and cargo from the ships on the road to and from the harbour but it came to noting.
1847 A new attempt was made to open a port and this was also not successful.
Only when there where diamonds found in Grqualand there came sufficient money free to start again. In 1872 the first shipments with equipment arrived and after setting up a platform for the cranes the construction was started of the south breakwater.
1875 The first wharf was constructed, 1876 another and in 1877 a third wharf.
1993 The harbour has now 2.6km of quay, and several railway lines connect the port with Transvaal and other regions. The turnover in that year appr. 3 million tons and 26,000 containers a year.
In the foreground is a white hulled cargo vessel visible, most probably a reefer vessel.

70c Port Elizabeth: On 12 March 1488 Bartolomeu Dias became the first recorded Occidental to call at Bahia de Lagos as he named the bay now known as Algoa Bay. As a seaport, however, the town of Port Elizabeth owns it origin to the British settlers of 1820. After their arrival, the need for a customs post arose. In 1825 the bay was given port status with the appointment of a port master, and a year later a collector was appointed. Today, Port Elizabeth is the fifth largest cargo-handling port in South Africa. The port has more as 3,400m of quayage and a container terminal with two berths. Recently a large container-handling terminal for imported motor vehicle components was developed.

90c Cape Town Harbour: Table Bay has been used as a landing place by passing ships ever since Bartolemeu Dias rounded the Cape of Good Hope in 1488. The port grew from the refreshment station founded by Jan van Riebeeck in April 1652 for ships of the Dutch East India Company. In 1656 work was started on a wooden jetty to facilitate the landing of small boats. During World War II, Cape Town handled more than 400 convoys, saw 13,000 ships repaired, and took in about 6 million soldiers. During the Suez crises in 1973, the port handled an enormous amount of shipping. Today (1993) Cape Town handled some 4.5 million of cargo annually. There are sophisticated container handling facilities as well as two dry-docks and extensive service facilities.

Durban Harbour: In 1823 the brig SALISBURY viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10957&p=11622&hilit=salisbury#p11622 sheltered in a bay on the Natal coast during a sudden storm. Impressed by the potential of the bay, Lieutenants King and Farewell obtained a concession for a trading store on the waterfront. Thus began the history of South Africa’s busiest port. Today over 500.000 containers are handled at the container terminal annually, the largest in Africa. A large passenger terminal also provides for the needs of ocean travellers.

Source: South Africa Post and internet.
South Africa 1993 35c/R1.05 sg 772/76, scott 844/48

The Battle of “Soleil Royal” and “Britannia” in 1692

The scene in this painting depicts Soleil Royal and Britannia exchanging fire during the Battle of Barfleur in 1692. Lead by Adm. Tourvilles and sorely outnumbered, the French fleet, purportedly under order from King Louis XIV, attacked the Allied fleet, which consisted of Dutch and British ships. The battle was fierce, and in the end, the French, overwhelmed, were forced to flee, splitting into two groups. Soleil Royal, the flagship of Adm. Tourvilles, along with eleven other French ships were pressed by the Allied fleet and driven ashore at Cape La Hougue. The Allied fleet brought up their fire ships and destroyed Soleil Royal along with the other eleven French ships in the surf off la Hougue. The remainder of the French fleet, caught in the famous tidal race of Alderney, were swept to the west where they took refuge in various creeks, some driven ashore. The design stamp is made after painting of James A Flood.

Source:http://www.jamesaflood.com/soleil.html Ivory Coast 2018;2170f.

KEBIR CLASS PATROL BOAT

For the 20th Anniversary of the Algerian Coast Guard service, Algeria issued one stamp which shows a patrol boat of the Coast Guard at that time.

In 1993 only one type was in use, the Kebir-class which were replaced in 1994 by a Chinese type patrol boat.

The first three were built in the U.K. the others in Algeria. The first was built in 1982 the last in?
Displacement 250 tons, dim. 37.5 x 6.86 x 1.78m.
Powered by two diesel engines, 6,000 bhp., twin shafts, speed 27 knots.
Armament 1 – 25mm AA gun and 2 – 14.5mm MG.
Crew 27.
So far I can find 6 were in the service of the Coast Guard, the others by the Algerian Navy.

Source: Internet various sites.
Algeria 1993 2.00D sg 1123, scott?
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A GLIMPSE OF EVERYDAY LIFE IN THE VIKING AGE

The full index of our ship stamp archive

A GLIMPSE OF EVERYDAY LIFE IN THE VIKING AGE

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Mar 16, 2014 8:12 pm

tmp13F.jpg
Click image to view full size
The stamp in the margin shows us two boats used in that time at the Faroer Islands and one used for daily use and fishing, the other under construction and in the background on the right a Viking longboat under sail.

Where people spend any amount of time, they leave traces, including the remains of the buildings they once erected in their settlements. Most domestic waste was thrown out of the door, where it remained unless anything that might be edible was eaten by domestic animals such as cats, dogs and pigs. It is this detritus that can give posterity an insight into what it was like to live in the past. If this knowledge is to be gained, however, such material relics must undergo archaeological investigation.

On the farms around the Faroe Islands the people of the Viking Age lived off what the land, both the infields and outlying pasture, could produce together with what could be caught at sea, landed from the coast and hunted in the mountains.

The kitchen utensils used in the households of the period were partly of domestic and partly of foreign origin. The imported goods were either produced abroad or made from foreign raw materials, i.e. materials that were not found locally on the islands. These included utensils and implements made from soapstone, e.g. vessels and pots, which were more or less bowl-shaped and were used for cooking. They varied greatly in size from less than 20 cm to around 50 cm in diameter. As the same types of vessel found on the Faroe Islands are also found in Norway, it is natural to assume that such goods were imported from Norway. Another possibility is Shetland, where soapstone is also found as a raw material.

Households used earthenware as well as soapstone vessels. Based on the information available, it is impossible to say whether the early settlers, or Landnamsmen as they are called, were already using earthenware when they arrived on the islands. There is a great deal to indicate, however, that earthenware became part of domestic life during the Viking Age, i.e. in the late 10th – 11th century. This is interesting in terms of cultural history, because back in Norway earthenware had been completely abandoned in favour of soapstone vessels, a practice that the Northmen brought with them as they travelled west. These earthenware vessels are all unglazed, shaped by hand, generally by coiling and without a wheel, and fired at a low temperature. There seems to be considerable variation in shape, with bowl-shaped, hemispherical and bucket-shaped vessels having been found. There is also considerable variation in size, with the opening varying between about 18 and 30 cm, for example, and the height between around 10 and 20 cm. Food encrustation on the inside indicates that the earthenware vessels were used for the preparation of food. However, no remains have been found that might have been linked to earthenware productionitself, e.g. kilns, but it is easy to imagine earthenware vessels being fired in the hearth.

The exciting investigations into animal bones that have taken place in recent years have provided an insight into the animal husbandry of the past and the resources exploited in the Viking Age. It has been established that pigs were widely kept in addition to sheep and cattle, while compared with other locations in the North Atlantic, seabirds accounted for a very large proportion of the diet on the Faroe Islands.

Rooms were illuminated by means of oil lamps, which might have been no more than hollowed-out stones. But there are also examples of lamps being carved from tuff, a soft, volcanic rock that was easy to carve, which is why such lamps often had various forms of simple decoration.

In addition to the above types of kitchen utensil made from stone, the people also used a lot of different vessels made from wood, including turned wooden vessels and small, carved rectangular vessels or bowls. Staves and heads from large and small crozed wooden vessels have also been found. The many finds of twisted juniper stems are characteristic of the remains of older settlements. Juniper grew locally when people and animals took possession of the islands. The stems have been found in many different lengths and thicknesses, and were used as handles for wooden vessels or as ropes, for example. Wooden pins of varying sizes have also been found. Some of then are frequently interpreted as being so-called “sausage skewers” and others as being spindles used for working with wool.

Apart from food preparation, other important indoor chores included wool processing. Finds of spindle whorls and warp weights bear witness to this activity. The spindle whorls, which can be of basalt or tuff, are often also made from fragments of broken soapstone pots. Weights were required for work on verticallooms. Some special forms of warp weight made of drilled slate for hanging seem to have been imported, but ordinary basalt stones with a groove round the outside were also widely used.

In daily work both indoors and out cutting implements such as knives and scythes, for example, were indispensable, and they had to be kept sharp. The number of whetstones found bears witness to this. They were made from both clay slate and mica schist – even whole blanks of the raw material for whetstones have been found. This is another example of goods that had to be imported from Norway.

Hay was produced for animal feed. But grain was also grown on the Faroe Islands, with the grain of the Viking Age being six-rowed barley. This had to be ground, which was done using millstones of relatively soft mica schist characterised by hard red garnets inclusions. This raw material is found at Hardanger in West Norway. Studies have shown that this area had large quarries that produced schist for making millstones for export as long ago as the Viking Age.

The fields were not the only place where work was done. Sinkers testify to the importance of fishing. These might be made from soapstone, which frequently turned out to have been reworked from vessel fragments. But it was most usual, perhaps, to use large and small pebbles with a groove round the outside to secure the line to.

Apart from the knives previously mentioned, metal artefacts include iron locks, rivets and fish hooks of various sizes. The metal finds frequently occur in very small fragments such as bronze plates with rivets attached, which may have been rim or opening hardware for wooden vessels, for example. The quitefrequent finds of slag may also be the result of forging to do with the utensils already mentioned.

In visualising how people on the Faroe Islands dressed during the Viking Age, we must make do with drawing comparisons with what is known from other locations in the North Atlantic, but there are several finds to indicate that people quite liked to dress up. There is, for example, evidence of objects that can be described as personal accessories – ornaments such as bone combs, for example, both single and double. People wore necklaces and bracelets with both amber beads and silver- or gold-coated glass beads. They also wore silver rings, fine bronze buckles and ring pins, which they attached to their clothes.

Leisure activities and children’s games clearly also played an important role in everyday life in the Viking Age. In addition to gaming pieces, half a game board has been found with “Nine Men’s Morris” on one side and the Old Norse game of “Hneftafl” on the other. Finely carved horses and toy boats were made for the children, with examples being found at the Viking Age farm in Kvívík and the summer settlement at Argisbrekka near the village of Eiði.

Just as in other locations in the North Atlantic the art of writing was also practised on the Faroe Islands in the Viking
Age. Several artefacts made of both wood and stone with engraved runes were found during the excavation of dwellings in Eiði and Leirvík, for example.

The imported materials provide clear evidence that the Viking Age population on the Faroe Islands was not isolated to any great extent. Such materials clearly indicate quite close contact with the outside world, as likely as not in the form of trading relations both with the inhabitants’ old homeland, with communication doubtlessly originating in Bergen, and the other Norse settlements in the areas to the south of the Faroe Islands.

Faroer Island 2005 7.50 Kr. SgMS?, scott?

Source: Faroer Post
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