SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Baltic Beauty 1926

Baltic Beauty is a two-masted small brigantine sailing ship. The steel hulled boat has wooden superstructure and has a sail area of around 452 square metres. Facilities on the ship include a large kitchen, bar, two toilets with shower and a sauna. The ship can accommodate 20 passengers on multi-day trips, and 58 passengers on day trips. she is now based in home port of Ronneby, Sweden.

History
Baltic Beauty was built in 1926 in the Netherlands. The ship has undergone a few name changes and was formerly known as was formerly Hans Ii, Sven Wilhelm and then Dominique Fredion. The ship was refurbished in 1989.

Cabins
The ship has sleeping accommodation for 20

Ship Summary
Built by: Capello NV, Zwartsluis, the Netherlands
Date Completed: 1926
Gross Tonnage: 68
Length: 40 m (overall length)
Width: 5 m
Passengers: 20
Crew: 5

Central African Republic

ODER KAHN

For the 700th Anniversary of Frankfurt on the Oder. East Germany used one stamp of 20 Pf which shows us the old town of Frankfurt on the Oder seen from the Löweninsel (Lionisland).
In the foreground is an Oder kahn, (barge) which is the general name of a small flat bottomed uncovered watercraft, which is used on inland waterways and protected waters.

The name kahn is one of the oldest documented boat names on the Baltic coast.
The depicted kahn is a one masted vessel which was used on the Oder river first built of wood later of iron. She were used on the river to transport coal to Berlin and Stettin and iron ore to Kosel.
Outboard rudder and on the stamp she has a deckhouse on the stern. The sailing kahns were fitted with leeboards.
The larger type of vessel was decked. The sailing type were used into the 1930.
Crew 2 – 4.
The vessel depict was ca. 46m. long, 5.6m. beam and had side height of 1.9m., loading capacity about 250 ton.

Source: Navicula. Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
East Germany 1953 20 Pf. sg E118, scott 403.

PORT OF D'OWENDO

In 1978 Gabon issued one stamp for the Port of D’Owendo, with alongside the quay two general cargo vessels, with a lot of deck cargo under which it looks some containers, it were not real container vessels as given by Stanley Gibbons. Of the two vessels I have not any information and so far I known she are not yet identified.

Owendo is a port city in Gabon, forming a south western suburb of Libreville. It lies at the western end of the Trans-Gabon Railway, and was officially opened in 1988. But the port was already in use when the first section of the Trans Gabon Railway was opened between Owendo and Ndjolé in 1978 when the stamp was issued.

Source: wikipedia.
Gabon 1978 50F sg 650, scott 403.

CUBA COAST GUARD 081

The stamp shows us a Cubanian coastguard vessel with pennant No 081 of which I have not any details, more info welcome.
The inscription on the stamp gives: "Detachment Looking at the Sea".

KONDOR CLASS MINESWEEPER

For the 35th Anniversary of the DDR (1949-1984) the East German Post issued three stamps of which the 20p has a maritime theme, it shows us a navy ship of the East Germany Volksmarine what is given by Navicula that she is one of the Kondor II class minesweepers.

Project 89 Kondor Minesweeper, also known as the Kondor class, was a class of minesweepers designed in the German Democratic Republic which was given the NATO designation of "Condor" There were 3 versions, namely, the prototype unit, Project 89.0; the first version, Project 89.1 (NATO designation: Condor I); and the second version, Project 89.2 (NATO designation: Condor II).
The class depict on the stamp was built as Project 89.2 as minesweepers on the Peenewerft in Wolgast, East Germany between 1971 and 1973 for the Volksmarine of the DDR.
The first built was the WOLGAST and commissioned in 1971, in total 30 were built of this class. After Germany was united most were sold to a foreign country, there are still 12 in active service in 2018.
Displacement 449 ton, dim. 56.7 x 7.76 x 2.22m. (draught).
Powered by two MD 40 diesel engines each 2,490 hp, twin shafts, speed 18 kn.
Range 1,900 mile
Armament: 3 – 25mm Flak 2M-3 (AA) carried 24 mines or 24 depth charges.
Crew 30.

The WOLGAST was commissioned 20 May 1971in the Volksmarine, sold to Indonesia in 1990 and still in service by the Indonesian Navy.

Source: Wikipedia and various other web-sites.
East German 1984 20p sg?, scott2429.

WORLD COMMUNICATION YEAR 1983 (DDR)

East Germany issued in 1983 four stamps for the “World Communication Year1983” of which two stamps have a maritime theme.

The 10p depict the radio station Rugen on Rugen Island in the Baltic, with in the distance stylized ships. The nearest is a cargo vessel (coaster) with two holds, the vessel to the right is also a cargo vessel with four holds, while the vessel on the left looks like a supply vessel but a supply vessel has no masts on the aft-deck, it can also be a small ro-ro vessel.

The 20p shows also a stylized four hold cargo vessel.

East Germany 1983 10p and 20p sg E2488 and E2489, scott 2220/21
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Halifax Explosion

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Halifax Explosion

Postby john sefton » Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:01 pm

Canada-Post-Unveils-Halifax-Explosion-Stamp-678x381.jpg
Click image to view full size
Halifax was devastated on 6 December 1917 when two ships collided in the city's harbour, one of them a munitions ship loaded with explosives bound for the battlefields of the First World War. The result was the largest human-made explosion prior to the detonation of the first atomic bombs in 1945. The north end of Halifax was wiped out by the blast and subsequent tsunami. Nearly 2,000 people died, another 9,000 were maimed or blinded, and more than 25,000 were left without adequate shelter.

Wartime Harbour
Halifax was a busy, wartime port city in 1917, its harbour crowded with merchant vessels and warships from Canada and Britain. The city’s population of nearly 50,000 was swollen by the constant coming and going of naval officials, sailors, and troops bound for service in Europe. With one of the finest ice-free harbours in North America, Halifax was an important staging area for trans-Atlantic convoys, which collected in the protected inner expanse of Bedford Basin before ferrying supplies and soldiers to the war effort.
Two of those merchant ships were the Norwegian vessel Imo, en route to New York to pick up relief supplies for the beleaguered population of war-torn Belgium, and the French munitions ship Mont-Blanc — filled with tons of benzol, picric acid, TNT and gun cotton — arriving to join a convoy across the Atlantic.

Collision
The Imo was departing the harbour on the morning of 6 December 1917. It was travelling south through the Narrows, the harbour's tightest navigation section, moving faster than it should and passing to the left (port side) of oncoming ships, rather than to the right (starboard), which was customary. The Mont-Blanc was entering the harbour bound for Bedford Basin when it encountered the Imo in the Narrows sailing toward it. Not only did incoming ships (in this case Mont-Blanc) have right-of-way over outgoing vessels, but the Imo was also sailing too far to the left, in what should have been Mont-Blanc's path.
After a series of whistles and miscommunications between the officers and pilots on the two ships, the Imo struck the starboard bow of the Mont-Blanc, generating sparks that ignited benzol stored on Mont-Blanc's deck; the burning liquid then seeped into the holds.
For nearly 20 minutes the Mont-Blanc burned, sending a huge plume of black smoke into the sky, attracting the attention of people on shore, including children on their way to school. The spectacle drew many residents to their windows and others towards the ship itself, including teams of firefighters and sailors from other ships wanting to put out the fire on the Mont-Blanc.
Few understood the danger, except for a handful of harbour and naval officials, and the French-speaking crew and the local harbour pilot of the Mont-Blanc, who fled the ship after the fire broke out, rowing desperately in lifeboats for the Dartmouth side of the harbour. As they did so, the crippled and burning Mont-Blanc drifted towards Pier 6 on the Halifax shore, a busy area containing residential homes, businesses, moored ships and a large sugar refinery.

Vincent Coleman
One man on shore who did know an explosion was imminent was Vincent Coleman, a railway dispatcher who worked in the nearby rail yards. He was warned by a navy man during the fire about the Mont-Blanc'sdeadly cargo.
Coleman controlled the busy freight and passenger rail traffic coming and going from the Halifax peninsula. As the Mont-Blanc burned and the minutes ticked by, Coleman stayed at his post, tapping out a message on his telegraph key, warning officials at stations up the line to stop any trains — including the 8:55 a.m. train from Saint John, New Brunswick, with hundreds of passengers on board — from entering Halifax. It's not clear whether Coleman was actually responsible for holding up the Saint John train, but his message, in the final minutes of his life, was clear:
"Hold up the train. Ammunition ship afire in harbour making for Pier 6 and will explode. Guess this will be my last message. Goodbye boys."
Explosion and Tsunami
The Mont-Blanc exploded just before 9:05 a.m. More than 2.5 km2 of the north end of Halifax, then known as Richmond, was totally levelled, either by the blast, the subsequent tsunami that washed over the neighbourhood, or the raging fire caused when structures collapsed inward on lanterns, stoves and furnaces. Homes, offices, churches, factories, vessels, the railway station and freight yards — and people in the immediate area — were obliterated. Farther from the epicentre, Citadel Hill deflected shock waves away from south and west Halifax, where shattered windows and doors were the predominant damage. Across the harbour, Dartmouth suffered devastation to a lesser degree, since its north section was sparsely developed. However, the Mi’kmaq settlement at Tuft’s Cove was completely destroyed.
The blast shattered windows in Truro, 100 km away, and was heard in in Prince Edward Island. The crew of the fishing boat Wave, working off the coast of Massachusetts, even claimed to have heard the boom rumbling across the ocean.
Author Laura MacDonald describes the ferocity of the explosion in her book, Curse of the Narrows:
"The air blast blew through the narrow streets, toppling buildings and crashing through windows, doors, walls, and chimneys until it slowed to 756 miles an hour, five miles below the speed of sound. The blast crushed internal organs, exploding lungs and eardrums of those standing closest to the ship, most of whom died instantly. It picked up others, only to thrash them against trees, walls, and lampposts with enough force to kill them. Roofs and ceilings collapsed on top of their owners. Floors dropped into the basement and trapped families under timber, beams and furniture. This was particularly dangerous for those close to the harbour because a fireball, which was invisible in the daylight, shot out over a 1–4 mile area surrounding the Mont-Blanc. Richmond houses caught fire like so much kindling. In houses able to withstand the blast, windows stretched inward until the glass shattered around its weakest point, sending out a shower of arrow-shaped slivers that cut their way through curtains, wallpaper and walls. The glass spared no one. Some people were beheaded where they stood; others were saved by a falling bed or bookshelf. . . . Many others who had watched the fire seconds before awoke to find themselves unable to see."
The blast shot vapourized sections of the ship and cargo upwards in a great fireball. The ship's anchor was sent flying across the city and over the Northwest Arm, nearly 4 km away (where it remains to this day). Meanwhile, burning metal fragments of the ship showered down on Halifax, along with a black rain of carbon particles.
People were also blown through the sky. Charles Mayers, third officer of the vessel Middleham Castle, was picked up and dropped nearly 1 km from his ship, landing atop Fort Needham Hill. "I was wet when I came down," Mayers said. "I had no clothes on when I came to, except my boots. There was a little girl near me and I asked her where we were. She was crying and said she did not know where we were. Some men gave me a pair of trousers and a rubber coat."

Death and Destruction
Across Halifax there were miraculous stories of survival. And equally, stories of tragedy. Many children were killed on their walk to school that morning, or blinded by flying glass. Those that survived the blast stumbled home, only to find their houses shattered, or their parents dead or wounded among the wreckage.
Nearly 2,000 people either died instantly, or succumbed to their injuries in the days that followed. Morgue records from 1918 show 1,611 known dead or missing — about a third of them under the age of 15. By 2004, the number of dead had been revised at 1,952. Nine thousand more were wounded, including 300 blinded or partially blinded by flying glass.
More than 1,500 buildings were destroyed and 12,000 damaged. Six thousand people were made homeless among more than 25,000 overall that lacked proper shelter after the explosion — a problem made worse by the winter blizzard that struck Halifax the next day. Total property damage amounted to an estimated $35 million.

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia
john sefton
 
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Re: Halifax Explosion

Postby aukepalmhof » Mon Nov 06, 2017 7:20 pm

The black hulled vessel in the foreground is the IMO and the other vessel is the MOUNT BLANC see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=9767#!lightbox[gallery]/0/
aukepalmhof
 
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