SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

ANDERS SPARRMANN and Tahitian canoes

On this stamp of Sweden is depict a portrait of the Swedish naturalist Anders Sparrmann who made a voyage with James Cook during his second voyage in 1772. The background shows a part of a painting made by William Hodges of Matavai Bay, Tahiti and the island from the north-west, with Mount Orofena in the distance, together with Point Venus and One-Tree Hill. The scene is diffused with the light from the rising sun on the left of the painting. Various Tahitian boats can be seen in the foreground; a small outrigger sailing canoe on the far left, the coastal craft in the centre with two figures on board, and the war canoe on the far right with its dominant stern. (the war canoe is not visible on the stamp.)
Read more at http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collection ... TGlOS4S.99

Wikipedia gives on Sparrmann:
Anders Sparrman (27 February 1748, Tensta, Uppland – 9 August 1820) was a Swedish naturalist, abolitionist and an apostle of Carl Linnaeus.
Sparrman was the son of a clergyman. At the age of nine he enrolled at Uppsala University, beginning medical studies at fourteen and becoming one of the outstanding pupils of Linnaeus. In 1765 he went on a voyage to China as ship's doctor, returning two years later and describing the animals and plants he had encountered. On this voyage he met Carl Gustaf Ekeberg.
He sailed for the Cape of Good Hope in January 1772 to take up a post as a tutor. When James Cook arrived there later in the year at the start of his second voyage, Sparrman was taken on as assistant naturalist to Johann and Georg Forster. After the voyage he returned to Cape Town in July 1775 and practiced medicine, earning enough to finance a journey into the interior. He was guided by Daniel Ferdinand Immelman, the young frontiersman who had previously guided the Swedish botanist Carl Peter Thunberg. Daniel and Sparrman reached the Great Fish River and returned in April 1776. In 1776 Sparrman returned to Sweden, where he had been awarded an honorary doctorate in his absence. He was also elected a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1777. He was appointed keeper of the natural historical collections of the Academy of Sciences in 1780, Professor of natural history and pharmacology in 1781 and assessor of the Collegium Medicum in 1790. In 1787 he took part in an expedition to West Africa, but this was not successful.
Sparrman published several works, the best known of which is his account of his travels in South Africa and with Cook, published in English as A voyage to the Cape of Good Hope, towards the Antarctic polar circle, and round the world: But chiefly into the country of the Hottentots and Caffres, from the year 1772 to 1776 (1789). He also published a Catalogue of the Museum Carlsonianum (1786–89), in which he described many of the specimens he had collected in South Africa and the South Pacific, some of which were new to science. He published an Ornithology of Sweden in 1806.
The asteroid 16646 Sparrman bears his name. The Swedish novelist Per Wästberg has written a biographical novel about Sparrman which was published in English in 2010, under the title as The Journey of Anders Sparrman. Anders Erikson Sparrman is denoted by the author abbreviation Sparrm. when citing a botanical name.

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anders_Sparrman
Sweden 1973 1k sg 746, scott 1006.

UTO LIGHTHOUSE

This stamp issued by Finland in 1946 for the 250th Anniversary of the Pilotage Authority shows us the old light tower of Uto built in 1753, on the stamp is also a sailing vessel which is not identified. The rigging looks like a schoonerbarque?

Uto is a small island in the archipelago of the Baltic Sea, Utö is the southernmost year-round inhabited island in Finland. Uto lighthouse was built upon this small island on the eastern side of the Uto inlet, which is the entrance of the channel that leads through and amongst the islands to Abo (Turku).

She was the oldest of the Finnish lighthouses and built in 1753 on Uto, also known as the main gateway to the Archipelago Sea. The Uto lighthouse was destroyed in the War of Finland 1808-1809, but was rebuilt in 1814. Subsequently, its tower has been remodelled several times.

The old tower was conical built, 30 meter high. The tower had two lights, an oil-light in the lantern on top of the tower and a coal fire outside the tower in an iron basket attached to the tower via a wooden type frame.

Source: Sailing directions for the Gulf of Finland, Navicula and internet
Finland 1946 8.00M sg 420, scott252.

KALEVALA POEM

For the 100th anniversary of the publication of the epic poem Kalevala, Finland issued three stamps in 1935 which shows on the 2,00 M stamp a type of Viking ship in which the hero of the epos Väinämöinen escaped with the “sampo”, made by the blacksmith Ilmarinen.
When the Goddess Louhi finds out that the “sampo” was stolen, she changed in an eagle, took her warriors on her back and landed on the boat of Väinämöinen (as seen on stamp), where after a battle started in which the boat sank, which took with her the “sampo”.
Plenty more on this poem you can find on the internet,

Encyclopaedia Britannica gives:
Kalevala, Finnish national epic compiled from old Finnish ballads, lyrical songs, and incantations that were a part of Finnish oral tradition.
The Kalevala was compiled by Elias Lönnrot, who published the folk material in two editions (32 cantos, 1835; enlarged into 50 cantos, 1849). Kalevala, the dwelling place of the poem’s chief characters, is a poetic name for Finland, meaning “land of heroes.” The leader of the “sons of Kaleva” is the old and wise Väinämöinen, a powerful seer with supernatural origins, who is a master of the kantele, the Finnish harplike stringed instrument. Other characters include the skilled smith Ilmarinen, one of those who forged the “lids of heaven” when the world was created; Lemminkäinen, the carefree adventurer-warrior and charmer of women; Louhi, the female ruler of Pohjola, a powerful land in the north; and the tragic hero Kullervo, who is forced by fate to be a slave from childhood.
Among the main dramas of the poem are the creation of the world and the adventurous journeys of Väinämöinen, Ilmarinen, and Lemminkäinen to Pohjola to woo the beautiful daughter of Louhi, during which the miraculous sampo, a mill that produces salt, meal, and gold and is a talisman of happiness and prosperity, is forged and recovered for the people of Kalevala. Although the Kalevala depicts the conditions and ideas of the pre-Christian period, the last canto seems to predict the decline of paganism: the maid Marjatta gives birth to a son who is baptized king of Karelia, and the pagan Väinämöinen makes way for him, departing from Finland without his kantele and songs.
The Kalevala is written in unrhymed octosyllabic trochees and dactyls (the Kalevala metre) and its style is characterized by alliteration, parallelism, and repetition. Besides fostering the Finnish national spirit, the poem has been translated into at least 20 languages; it has inspired many outstanding works of art, e.g., the paintings of Akseli Gallen-Kallela and the musical compositions of Jean Sibelius. The epic style and metre of the poem The Song of Hiawatha by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow also reflect the influence of the Kalevala.

Finland 1935 2.00M sg 307, scott 208. The painting shows the landing of Louhi on the boat, painting is made by Aksell Gallen Kallela.

Haukur 1973

Haukur was built in Reykjavík in 1973, thus being a youngster for a wooden boat. In the beginning she was designed as a fishing boat but due to the shipbuilder’s respect and enthusiasm for old sail boats the hull shape was rather unusual and in fact with a resemblance to the old shark and fishing schooners that were common around Iceland in the 19th century. When North Sailing bought the boat in 1996 it was soon clear that the boat would be a great sailing vessel and after serving 5 summers as an ordinary whale watching vessel the boat was transformed to a two mast schooner in the shipyard of Húsavík.

Phoenix 1929

The Phoenix is a ship built by Hjorne & Jakobsen at Frederikshavn, Denmark in 1929, originally as an Evangelical Mission Schooner.
Length: 112ft Beam21.9ft Draught 8.5ft. Propulsion 12 sails, 235 h.p. Volvo. Crew of 10

Missionary and cargo ship
Twenty years later she retired from missionary work and carried cargo until her engine room was damaged by fire. In 1974 she was bought by new owners who converted her into a Brigantine before being purchased by Square Sail in 1988. A first aid over-haul enabled her to sail back to the UK where she underwent a complete refit.
Appearances in films
Caravel Santa Maria
During 1991 she was converted to the 15th century Caravel Santa Maria for Ridley Scott's film 1492: Conquest of Paradise. The ship was known as Santa Maria until, in 1996, due to increasing demand for period square-riggers, she was converted into a 2 masted Brig and reverted to her original name Phoenix of Dell Quay.
Hornblower Series 3
Phoenix of Dell Quay was used as the ship Retribution in the Hornblower Series 3.

Wikipedia

Spirit of New Zealand 1986

The tall ship Spirit of New Zealand is a steel-hulled, three-masted barquentine from Auckland, New Zealand. It was purpose-built by the Spirit of Adventure Trust in 1986 for youth development. It is 42.5 m in total length and carries a maximum of 40 trainees and 13 crew on overnight voyages. The ship's home port is Auckland, and it spends most of its time sailing around the Hauraki Gulf. During the summer season, it often sails to the Marlborough Sounds and Nelson, at the top of the South Island.
The spirit of the project was derived from the sail training operations of the schooners "Sir Winston Churchill" and "Malcolm Miller" which were built for the organisation formerly known as the Sail Training Association ( STA) https://www.spiritofadventure.org.nz/th ... ur-history
The ship is used for a year-round programme of youth development, consisting primarily of 10-day individual voyages for 15- to 19-year-olds and 5-day Spirit Trophy voyages for teams of 10 Year 10 students. Once a year an Inspiration voyage for trainees with physical disabilities is run, as well as board of trustees and Navy training voyages. In addition, adult day, weekend and coastal voyages are offered to paying members of the public. The ship is usually in dry-dock for refit in November and does not sail on Christmas Day.
Design
The Spirit of New Zealand is a barquentine-rigged three-masted steel hull 33.3 m (109 ft) long, with an overall length of 45.2 m (148 ft) including the bowsprit, and a maximum width of 9.1 m (29.9 ft). She has a draft of about 4 m (13 ft) and a displacement of 286 tons. Under power, the Spirit of New Zealand can reach a top speed of 10 knots, and 14 knots under sail. A new engine installed in late 2010 is expected to increase the vessel's maximum speed.
The three steel masts are 28.7, 31.3, and 28.0 metres high and carry 14 sails totalling 724.3m² (7,965 ft²). There are 3 jibs and 4 square sails on the foremast. The main and mizzen masts are gaff rigged, and both can carry a gaff-topsail. In addition, there are 3 staysails on the main mast.
The hull is painted black with the ship's name and the Trust's website painted in white at the bow and across the stern. In addition, a large silver fern is painted on either side of the bow beneath the name. A stainless steel rubbing strake runs the length of the vessel and circular port holes are visible above the waterline. A wooden rail runs around the edge of the entire deck.
The standard crew of the Spirit of New Zealand has varied during her lifetime, but in 2010 consisted of 1 master, 3 mates, 1 cook, 1 engineer, 2 cadets, 3 volunteer watch assistants, 2 leading hands and 40 trainees. For day sail voyages, the ship is registered to carry significantly more passengers. The trainees are normally split 20 male and 20 female, and sleep in separate accommodation. A change to the male accommodation was made so that 6 of the bunks could be separated from the remainder, allowing voyages to sail with 26 females and 14 males. This change was made in response to frequently higher female applicants than male applicants.
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ISE battleship

The full index of our ship stamp archive

ISE battleship

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Nov 19, 2017 6:38 pm

ise battleship.jpg
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1999 ise.jpg
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The stamp of 80Y is one out of a Japanese miniature sheet for the 1914-1920 Millennium set, the design of this stamp was adopted from a part of “Shonen Gunkan Sugoruku” (Japanese battleship board game for boys by Kawabata Ryushi 1885-1966), and represent the First World War and shows in the foreground the Japanese battleship ISE at that time the newest and most powerful ship in the Japanese Navy.

Built as a battleship on the Japanese shipyard Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Kobe for the Japanese Imperial Navy.
10 May 1915 laid down.
12 November 1916 launched as the ISE, named after the Province Ise, one sister the HYUGA.
Displacement 31,760 ton standard, 37,100 ton full load, dim. 208.2 x 28.7 x 8.93m. (draught), length bpp.195.7m.
Powered by two sets Brown-Curtis steam turbines, 45,000 shp, four shafts, speed 23 knots.
Range by a speed of 14 knots, 9,680 mile.
Armament: 6 – 356mm, 16 – 140mm, 12 – 76mm, 4 – 76mm AA guns and 6 – submerged 533mm torpedo tubes.
Crew 1,198.
15 December 1917 completed.

ISE (senkan)), was the lead ship of the two-vessel ISE-class battleship of the Imperial Japanese Navy, which saw combat service during the Pacific War. ISE was named after Ise Province, one of the traditional provinces of Japan, now part of Mie Prefecture.

Operational history
Early histor
Originally planned to be the third Fusō-class battleship, experience gained in the construction of the Fusō class revealed a number of design issues, including weak armament and protection, which forced a redesign and new classification.
ISE was laid down at the Kawasaki Heavy Industries shipyard in Kobe on 5 May 1915, launched on 12 November 1916, and completed on 15 December 1917 and assigned to the Kure Naval District.
Completed too late for service in World War I, in the early 1920s, ISE participated in numerous patrols off the Siberia coast and in northern waters in support of Japan's Siberian Intervention against the Bolshevik Red Army.
On 12 April 1922, while at Yokohama, ISE hosted a delegation which included the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VIII), who was accompanied by his second cousin, the future Lord Mountbatten of Burma. From the mid-1920s through the late 1930s, ISE patrolled mostly off the China coast.
In 1928-1929, ISE was rebuilt at the Kure Naval Arsenal, with its foremast increased in height in the distinctive "pagoda" style similar to HARUNA. The fore funnel was fitted with a curved smoke cap, and a flying off platform for Yokosuka E1Y2 Type 14 floatplanes was fitted atop No. 5 main turret. Later, from 1930–1931, additional searchlights and a derrick was installed at the stern for handling floatplanes.
However, a more complete upgrade occurred from 20 November 1931 – 10 February 1932 at Kure Naval Arsenal, which involved shortening the mainmast top section, replacing all the 76 mm (3.0 in)/40 cal AA guns with eight Type 89 127 mm (5.0 in)/40 cal AA guns (4x2), and adding four Vickers Type 40 mm (1.6 in) AA guns (2x2). The shielded 140 mm (5.5 in)/40 cal guns from the forecastle deck were removed and a catapult and aircraft handling crane were fitted to the fantail. On 14 May 1933, a second catapult and three Type 90 seaplanes were added.
From 1 August 1935, ISE was drydocked at Kure Naval Arsenal and underwent an extensive reconstruction and modernization. The 24 mixed-fired (coal and oil) boilers were replaced by eight new Kampon oil-fired boilers and new Kampon geared turbines were fitted. Maximum speed increased to 25.4 kn (47.0 km/h; 29.2 mph) (25.21 kn (46.69 km/h; 29.01 mph) was reached during trials). The fore funnel was removed and stern lengthened by 7.62 m (25 ft). Anti-torpedo bulges were added and her six submerged torpedo tubes were removed. The maximum elevation of ISE's main battery (with the exception of the aftermost turret No. 6) was increased to 43°. Two forward 140 mm (5.5 in) casemate guns were removed, as was done with most other Japanese warships during this period, due to their exposed nature in heavy seas. The elevation of secondary guns was increased from 20° to 30° and range increased from 15,800 m (51,800 ft) to 19,100 m (62,700 ft). Four 40 mm (1.6 in) Vickers AA guns were replaced by 10 Type 96 twin 25 mm (0.98 in)/60 cal AA guns. The original catapult was replaced by a Kure Type No. 2 Mod. 5 catapult and the aircraft handling deck was extended. Reconstruction was completed by 27 March 1937.

Start of the Pacific War
Despite these efforts at modernization and upgrading, ISE was still considered obsolete by the start of the Pacific War due to her relatively slow speed, large crew, and short range, and never saw combat as a battleship. ISE participated in the attack on Pearl Harbor (albeit on a sortie from Hashirajima as far as the Bonin Islands) and pursued but did not catch the American carrier force that had launched the Doolittle Raid on 18 April 1942.
In May, ISE had an accident which flooded her No. 2 engine room. During repair work, ISE was fitted with one of the first experimental model Type 21 radar sets in the Japanese navy.

Reconstruction
To partially compensate for the loss of carrier strength at the Battle of Midway, Navy Aircraft Department began plans to convert the ISE-class battleships to full-sized aircraft carriers each carrying 54 planes. This concept was abandoned due to lack of time and resources and a hybrid battleship/carrier concept was adopted. ISE was dry-docked, and her aft No. 5 and No. 6 main turrets were removed and replaced by a hangar surmounted by a 70 m (230 ft) long flight deck and a "T"-shaped aircraft elevator. This was long enough to permit the launch of aircraft, but not their recovery. Two 25 m (82 ft) Model 11 catapults were installed on tall supports on the port and starboard sides forward of the flight deck. A collapsible derrick crane was fitted port abaft (two cranes were originally planned but installation was not carried out). It was realized that a single faulty aircraft engine could ruin the whole concept, so, to prevent jams, the deck was fitted with two rails to each catapult, 12 turntables, trolleys and tie-downs. Plans called for the new hangar to carry nine planes inside, with 11 on deck and one on each catapult. The new deck was covered with 200 mm (7.9 in) of concrete to compensate for the unbalanced condition created after removal of the aft armament. A 1 m (3 ft) thick layer of concrete was also poured around the main and reserve steering rooms and a 150 mm (5.9 in) horizontal armor cover was added.
Additional anti-aircraft weapons were installed to better fight off aerial attack. The eight single 127 mm (5.0 in) DP guns were replaced with eight twin-mounts, and the Type 96 25 mm (0.98 in) AA guns were increased from 20 to 57 (including 19 triple-mounts). Type 21 air-search radar and two Type 22 surface-search radars were also installed. As modified, ISE could carry 22 aircraft. The operational concept envisioned ISE accompanying the Kido Butai (Carrier Strike Force), and launching its 11 Yokosuka D4Y2 SuISEi ("Judy") dive bombers and 11 Aichi E16A Zuiun ("Paul") seaplanes that are capable of diving attacks to add another 44 bombers to the Strike Force. The SuISEi had to land either on a conventional carrier or on land bases, whereas the E16A could be hoisted back aboard using a crane, after landing near the ship. ISE's final aircraft allowance called for 14 E16As and eight D4Y2s.
The rebuild was officially completed on 8 October 1943; however, as training with the new pilots was not completed by autumn 1944, ISE was never used in its new configuration in an operational mission. Its aircraft were offloaded to land bases, and ISE continued to be used as a pure battleship in the cover force.
ISE made a sortie to Truk in October 1943, conveying a detachment of the IJA 52nd Division and supplies.
In a refit in Kure in May 1944, 47 additional Type 96 25 mm (0.98 in) AA guns (12 triple, 11 single mount) were added, bringing the total to 104 guns. Two Type 2 IFF units were also installed. In July, two Type 13 air-search radar and an E27 Radar detector were installed. From the end of September 1944, six racks of 30-tube, 127 mm (5.0 in) anti-aircraft rocket launchers were added. The rockets had multiple incendiary shrapnel charges and a timed fuse.

Battle of Leyte Gulf and afterwards
ISE was slightly damaged in October 1944 in the Battle off Cape Engaño, during which ISE's gunners shot down five of the 10 attacking dive bombers, suffering from one small hit on the No. 2 turret. ISE's anti-aircraft cover was ineffective, and by the end of the battle, USN aircraft had sunk the Japanese aircraft carriers ZUIKAKU, ZUIHÖ and CHITOSE, and the destroyer AKIZUKI. Towards the end of the battle, in the fourth attack, ISE was attacked by 85 dive bombers. After 34 near misses, ISE's hull plates near the waterline ruptured and port boiler rooms were damaged; a bomb damaged the port catapult, and five crewmen were killed, with 71 wounded.
After returning to Japan, from 29 October, the aft catapults were removed to improve the firing arcs of the No. 3 and No. 4 turrets.
ISE was dispatched south to Lingga and Singapore in early 1945 for Operation Kita. On the approach to Singapore, ISE was slightly damaged by a naval mine. In Operation Kita, ISE, her sister ship HYUGA and cruiser ÖVODO were loaded with critically needed strategic war supplies (oil, rubber, tin, zinc, and mercury) and evacuate 1,150 oil field personnel back to Japan. ISE arrived back safely in Moji on 19 February 1945, having evaded or escaped pursuit by twenty three Allied submarines along the way,
Final role
From 25 February 1945 until the surrender of Japan, ISE remained docked at Kure, without fuel or aircraft, and repainted in a camouflage olive green with splotches. The camouflage was not effective against USN Task Force 58 carrier-based aircraft on 19 March 1945, when more than 240 aircraft attacked Kure and ISE was hit by two bombs. Re-designated as a fourth-class reserve ship on 20 April, ISE was towed to Ondo Seto (between Kure and Kurahashijima) to serve as a floating anti-aircraft battery. She was attacked again on 24 July by 60 carrier-based aircraft, whose bombs hit the starboard bow, flight deck, main deck, No. 3 turret and bridge, killing Captain Mutaguchi, other bridge officers and around 50 crewmen. On 28 July, in another attack on ISE, she was struck by five 450 kg (1,000 lb) bombs dropped by F4U Corsairs from USS HANCOCK, and eleven more bombs dropped by other aircraft from TF 58. ISE listed starboard and sank in shallow water at
34°15′N 132°31′E34.250°N 132.517°E. She was removed from the Navy list on 20 November 1945.
ISE's underwater hulk section was for some time left where it was and she was scrapped without being raised by the Kure Dockyard of the Harima Zosen Yard from 9 October 1946 – 4 July 1947.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_battleship_ISE
Japan 1999 80y sg ?, scott?
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