SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Olivier de Kersauson

Olivier de Kersauson (full name: Olivier de Kersauson de Pennendreff, born 20 July 1944) is a Frenchsailor and sailing champion. Kersauson was the seventh child in a family of eight. While he was the only Kersauson not to have been born in Brittany, he was born on 20 July 1944 and brought up near Morlaix in a “provincial Catholic aristocracy with compulsory mass” as he calls it. Very early on, Olivier de Kersauson was to break away from his family. Without being inattentive, he was a pupil who did not settle in well to school life with the priests at boarding school. He passed through eleven schools altogether. After his final school exams and getting up to a lot of things, always on the coast, he began studying economics. At the age of twenty-two, he met Eric Tabarly in Saint Malo. Shortly after, Eric invited him to do his military service on board. This opportunity stretched into eight years during which he was Tabarly’s mate. Together, they put on their boots and waterproofs, swallowing up the miles aboard the Pen Duicks. Very quickly, Olivier de Kersauson developed a passion for multihulls in which he became a pioneer. He was, in particular, the first to build a multihull of composite material, Ribourel, then a trimaran with long floaters, Poulain, at the helm of which he set in 1989-1990 the single-handed round the world speed record. From 1992 onwards, he spent his time working towards the Jules Verne Trophy, the round the world crew record. Wearing the livery of Lyonnaise des Eaux - Dumez, in 1994, he raced around the world against Peter Blake. At the helm of his catamaran Enza, the New Zealander and his six-member crew managed to go around the world in 74 days and 22 hours, while the five Frenchmen took 77 days and five hours. Remaining determined, he made some improvements to his boat and wearing the livery of Sport Elec, took off again around the world. On 8 March 1997, Olivier de Kersauson and his six-man crew left Brest. They were to return triumphant 71 days, 14 hours, 22 minutes and 8 seconds later, improving by more than a week on Peyron’s first time. In 2001, he named his giant trimaran Geronimo, "because Geronimo never gave up. It was at the helm of this boat that Olivier de Kersauson took the Jules Verne Trophy for the second time in 2004 (63 days, 13 hours, 59 minutes). In January 2003, Kersauson claimed that his boat was attacked by a giant squid.
Centrafricaine 1961;100f;Sg783. Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olivier_de_Kersauson

RAIATEA canoe

This stamp designed after a painting made by Herb Kane shows us a canoe from Rurutu, noting I could find on the canoes of Rurutu only what was given by the British missionary Ellis who visited this islands around 1820. Have searched the net for more info, but I think this canoe is now extinct.
The stamp shows a canoe, who has a very high stem and stern. The painting after the stamp was designed is showed http://herbkanehawaii.com/image-catalog ... moorea-c5/
Ellis wrote about this canoe:
One canoe, that brought a chief from Rurutu, upwards of three hundred miles, was very large. It was somewhat in the shape of a crescent, the stern and stem high and pointed, and the sides broad; the depth from the upper edge of the middle to the keel was not less than twelve feet. It was built with thick planks of the Barringtonia, some of which were four feet wide; they were sewn together with twisted or braided coconut husk.
http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarl ... d2-d8.html

French Polynesia 1976 30f sg 228, scott?

VAKA TOU'UA canoe of the Marquesas Islands

The stamp issued by French Polynesia in 1976 shows us a “vaka tou’ua” canoe, the stamp is designed after a painting made by Herb Kane, who also designed the four stamps see: http://herbkanehawaii.com/image-catalog ... lands-c40/
The inscription on the painting gives that she is a “va’a tou’ua”.
The word waka or vaka are many time used for canoes on the Pacific Islands, and means canoe.

Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft, has nothing on the “waka tou’ua” but only for the ‘vaka tou’uá” it gives for the canoe:
The “vaka tou’uá used in the Marquesas Island and Eastern Pacific, is now an extinct double canoe and was used for interisland travel, war, and probably migration.
Dugout hulls of roughly the same length, joined by three stout beams; especially large canoes required butting two logs together; sides raised by washstrakes. Form of ends variously depicted; some projected horizontally at both ends, stern sweeping up to a lofty stylized bird’s head, or both ends curved up to tall end pieces. Some had a platform (hou ua) laid atop the booms; often used by warriors. Sailed and paddled. Single V-shaped mat sail set to a mast stepped forward crossbeam.
Length at least 12m

Source: Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft
French Polynesia 1976 25f sg 227, scott?

ARMED SPEEDBOOT Iran-Iraq conflict 1980s

The armed speed-boot showed on this stamp was to honour the “Week of Basij”: Pasdaran Iranians resumed in the course of a maritime action during the conflict between Iran and Iraq in the 1980s. In my eyes it looks more a suicide mission, not any protection for the crew on the boat who did not have any change to survive this raid against a well-armed enemy.

Wikipedia gives on the Basij:
The Basij is a paramilitary volunteer militia founded by the order of the Ayatollah Khomeini in November 1979. The Basij are (at least in theory) subordinate to, and receive their orders from, the Iranian Revolutionary Guards and current Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei. However they have also been described as "a loosely allied group of organizations" including "many groups controlled by local clerics." Currently, the Basij serve as an auxiliary force engaged in activities such as internal security as well as law enforcement auxiliary, the providing of social service, organizing of public religious ceremonies, and as morality police and the suppression of dissident gatherings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamic_R ... orps#Basij
Iran 1992 40r sg 2727, scott 2546

CARAT yacht

The yacht depict on this stamp is the Frers designed 50 footer CARAT which was built as the RETALIATION, which was skippered by Dennis Conner to overall victory in the 1982 SORC. RETALIATION was another development of Frers' earlier BLIZZARD, but with slightly less fullness in the stern. At that time was the owner of the yacht F. Parker Heineman from Old Saybrook, Conn. USA.
Where the yacht was built I could not find.

RETALIATION was later sold to Swedish yachtsman Victor Forss. She was re-named CARAT and went on to compete in the 1982 Sardinia Cup. However, despite her impressive performance in that year's SORC, she was disappointing in Sardinia, finishing a lowly 46th, struggling to save her time in the generally light airs against lower rated boats. She showed some of her earlier form, however, in the 1983 SORC when she finished as top boat in Class B, and 22nd overall.
CARAT was also selected for the Swedish team for the 1983 Admiral's Cup, alongside another Frers 51, BLA CARAT, the ex-ACADIA, winner of the 1978 SORC and which had finished second in Class B in the 1983 SORC. The third member of the Swedish team was the Norlin 42, PAPER TIGER. CARAT was one of three 40.0ft IOR "maxi-raters" in the 1983 Admiral's Cup, alongside Ireland's MOONDUSTER, another Frers 51 footer and BLA CARAT.
CARAT had another disappointing regatta, as did the whole of the Swedish team, finishing in 32nd place (with redress points awarded for an incident in the second race). After two average places in the breezier first two races (23/21), CARAT slumped to last place in the wind-less Channel Race, and then bounced back to win the fourth race held in the open waters of Christchurch Bay and in a breeze that was much more suited to the big boats. They were further helped by a wind shift that came through just after they reached the first mark and affected the chasing pack, and a dying breeze that then slowed the smaller boats further. But CARAT then finished 34th in the Fastnet race finale, and, with similarly lacklustre results by BLA CARAT and PAPER TIGER, the Swedish team finished in 14th place, of 15 teams.

CARAT then went on to compete in the 1984 SORC, in Class B against a newer version of RETALIATION. With a slightly higher rating of 40.2ft, CARAT finished sixth in class and 40th overall.
http://rbsailing.blogspot.com/search?q=+CARAT

Not more info or the fate of the yacht, more info welcome.

Grenada 1992 $5 sg 2442, scott 2136

Canoe Racing in the province of Manus

For fifty-one weeks of the year, the islanders of the atolls of Papua New Guinea use their canoe outriggers for fishing and commuting between the islands. For a few days in August they race, skilled sailors battling it out for the honor of their island. The best sailors of the islands take part in canoe races. For example, in 2015, ninety-six canoes took part in six classes in the Ninigoro Island race over five days. . This event could not be missed! Papua New Guinea has released a brand dedicated to canoeing in the province of Manus. For more information about the canoes in the Manus District , see: viewtopic.php? F = 2 & t = 15288.
Papua New Guinea 20. Source: various web-sites.
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T-class INS DAKAR (77)

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T-class INS DAKAR (77)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:43 pm

T klasse.jpg
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ins dakar 2.jpg
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Built by H.M. Dockyard Devonport as HMS TOTEM (P 352) for the Royal Navy, laid down:22 October 1942, launched:28 September 1943.
Displacement:1,290 tons surfaced, 1,560 tons submerged, length:276’ 6” (84.28 m.) beam:25’ 6” (7.77 m.) draught: 12’ 9” (3.89 m.) forward, 14’ 7” (4.45 m.) aft.
Twin diesel engines:2,500 hp. (1.86 MW) each, Twin electric motors:1,450 hp. (1.08 MW) each, 2 shafts, 15.5 kn. surfaced, 9 kn. submerged, range:4,500 nm. at 11 kn. surfaced
Test depth:300’ (91 m.) max. Complement:61.
Armament:6 internal forward-facing torpedo tubes, 2 external forward-facing torpedo tubes, 2 external amidships rear-facing torpedo tubes, 1 external rear-facing torpedo tubes
6 reload torpedoes, 1-QF 4” (100 mm.) deck gun, 3 anti-aircraft machine guns.

HMS TOTEM was built to the group 3 variant of the T class design at HM Dockyard Devonport and launched on 28 September 1943. The submarine was completed and commissioned in early 1945. After the end of World War II, TOTEM and the other surviving group 3 boats were equipped with submarine snorkels to allow longer periods of operation underwater. Between 1951 and 1953, TOTEM was one of eight boats converted to the "Super T" design, which allowed the vessel higher speed and quieter underwater operation.

In 1965, TOTEM was purchased by Israel, along with two of her T-class sister boats, TRUNCHEON and TURPIN. The former TOTEM was commissioned into the Israeli Navy on 10 November 1967 as INS DAKAR (דקר), (English: Swordfish), under the command of Major Ya'acov Ra'anan.

DAKAR left the shipyard for Scotland to conduct her sea and dive trials. Late in 1967, after two successful months of trials, DAKAR returned to Portsmouth, England and left for Israel on 9 January 1968.

After leaving England, DAKAR put into Gibraltar on the morning of 15 January, departing at midnight and proceeded across the Mediterranean Sea on snorkel. She reported her position by radio to submarine headquarters in Haifa and was expected to enter her home base on Friday, 2 February, but as she was making excellent time, averaging over eight knots, Ra'anan requested permission to enter port earlier. He was ordered to enter on 29 January. Later, Ra'anan requested to enter a day earlier, on 28 January. This request was denied, the scheduled welcoming ceremony could not be moved.

At 06:10 on 24 January DAKAR transmitted her position, 34.16°N 26.26°E, just east of Crete. Over the next 18 hours she sent three control transmissions, which did not include her position, the last at 00:02 25 January 1968. No further transmissions were received.

On 26 January the British Admiralty reported the submarine was missing and gave the last known position as 100 miles (160 km) west of Cyprus. An international search and rescue operation began, including units from Israel, the United States, Greece, Turkey, Britain and Lebanon. Although Haifa Navy radio began broadcasting calls to commercial vessels to be on the look out for the DAKAR, Israeli officials would not admit the submarine was missing. On 27 January, a radio station in Nicosia, Cyprus, received a distress call on the frequency of DAKAR's emergency buoy, apparently from south-east of Cyprus, but no further traces of the submarine were found. On 31 January, all non-Israeli forces abandoned their search at sunset. Israeli forces continued the search for another four days, giving up at sundown on 4 February 1968.

Israel denied that the DAKAR sank as the result of hostile action and stated that the DAKAR was involved in crash diving exercises on its return voyage and was lost, probably as a result of a mechanical failure. On 25 April 1968, Vice Admiral Abraham Botzer, commander of the Israeli Navy, stated that the DAKAR sank on 24 January 1968, two days before being reported missing, due to "technical or human malfunctioning" ruled out "foul play".

On 9 February 1969, over a year after DAKAR went missing, a fisherman found her stern emergency buoy marker washed up on the coast of Khan Yunis, a town southwest of Gaza. British T-class submarines had two such buoy markers, bow and stern, secured behind wooden doors in cages under the deck and attached to the submarine with metal cables 200 meters (650 ft) long. Experts examining the 65 cm (two feet) of cable still attached to the buoy determined that the buoy had remained attached to the submarine for most of the preceding year until the cable broke completely, that DAKAR rested in depth between 150 and 326 meters, and that she was 50–70 nmi (93–130 km) off her planned route. All of these determinations were wrong, and misled searchers for decades. It was not until April 1999 and some 25 failed expeditions later that a search effort was concentrated along the path of the original route.

On 1 January 1970, the Egyptian newspaper Al Akhbar reported that the DAKAR had been sunk by an Egyptian warship with depth charges. The Egyptian story was told in a 2 July 2005 interview by Asharq Al-Awsat with General Mohamed Azab (major at that time):
On 23 January 1968, the Egyptian frigate, ASSYOUT, left Alexandria base in a training mission for the naval academy. After completing the training assignment and during the return journey to the base; students noticed the periscope of an alien submarine roaming in Egyptian waters, about two miles (3 km) off Alexandria. The Egyptian commander was informed and the decision was taken to attack the unknown submarine. However, the submarine made a very quick and hasty dive and the Egyptian ship lost its trace. General Azab reported the story to his commanders and mentioned that there is a probability that the submarine had crashed into the seabed. However, the story was not believed by the higher Egyptian commanders and there was no sufficient evidence to start a search process. General Azab mentioned that the submarine may have crashed into the seabed due to the shallow depth of water in that region, about 36 meters, while it needed at least 40 meters to dive, however, it appears that the submarine commander decided to take the risk.
The Israeli government stated there was no evidence to substantiate the Egyptian unofficial charges.

During the 1980's the Israelis, using a salvage vessel with Egyptian liaison officers, conducted three searches to look for the DAKAR in waters north of Sinai and another search off the Greek island of Rhodes. In August 1986, the U.S. Navy committed a P-3 Orion marine reconnaissance and a S-3 anti-submarine warfare aircraft for a search of Egyptian waters near al-Arish. In October 1998, Israel began running advertisements in newspapers in Turkey, Egypt, France, Greece and Russia offering rewards of up to $300,000 for any information on the fate of the DAKAR.

On 24 May 1999 a joint U.S.–Israeli search team using information received from U.S. intelligence sources and led by subcontractor Thomas Kent Dettweiler of the American Nauticos Corporation, detected a large body on the seabed between Crete and Cyprus, at a depth of some 3,000 meters (9,800 ft). On 28 May the first video pictures were taken by the remote operated vehicle REMORA II, making it clear that DAKAR had been found. She rests on her keel, bow to the northwest. Her conning tower was snapped off and fallen over the side. The stern of the submarine, with the propellers and dive planes, broke off aft of the engine room and rests beside the main hull.

During October 2000 a survey of the DAKAR wreckage and the wreckage site was undertaken by Nauticos corporation and the Israeli navy; some artifacts were recovered, including the submarine's bridge, the boat's gyrocompass and many small items.

The exact cause of the loss is unknown, but it appears that no emergency measures had been taken before DAKAR dove rapidly through her maximum depth, suffered a catastrophic hull rupture, and continued her plunge to the bottom. The emergency buoy was released by the violence of the hull collapse, and drifted for a year before washing ashore.

Sisterships: INS DOLPHIN (ex HMS TRUNCHEON P 353)
Built by Devonport Dockyard, laid down:5 November 1942, launched:22 February 1944, commissioned:25 May 1945,same specifications, sold to Israeli Navy in 1968, scrapped in 1977.

INS LEVIATHAN (ex HMS TURPIN P 354)
Built by Chatham Dockyard, laid down:24 May 1943, launched:5 August 1943, commissioned:18 December 1944, same specifications, sold to Israeli Navy in 1965, scrapped in 1978.

(Israel 2017, 2.50 sh. StG.?)
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D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen
 
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