SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

WORLD ROWING CHAMPIONSHIP 1966

Yugoslavia issued in 1966 a set of stamps of which the 1d stamp is for the 1966 World Rowing Championship in 1966 in Yugoslavia, see
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1966_Worl ... mpionships

The stamp shows us a single scull, see:
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=15536&p=17937&hilit=single+scull#p17937

Yugoslavia 1966 1d sg?, scott ?

QUEEN ELIZABETH HMS (R 08)

Built in 2009-2017 by Aircraft Carrier Alliance, Rosyth Yard, Five, for the Royal Navy, ordered on 20-05-2008, laid down on 07-07-2009, launched on 17-07-2014, completed on 07-12-2017.
Aircraft Carrier, displacement:65,000 tons, L:284m. B:39m. over the waterline, maximum 73m. height:56m. draft:11m. 2 Rolls-Royce MT30 gasturbines:48,000 hp. (36 MW.) 4-16 cyl. Wärtsilä 38 diesels each:15,600 hp. 4 Converteam electric engines each:27,000 hp. (20 MW.) 2 shafts, 29 kn. radius:8000-10,000 nm. complement:679 and 250 marines, armament:3 Phalanx CIWS 20 mm. guns, 4-30 mm. cannons, several small canons and GPMG's, 36 F-35 Lightning II aircrafts en 4 helicopters.
At the end of June 2017 she left for her first sea trial, in 2020 she will be fully operational.

HMS Queen Elizabeth is the lead ship of the Queen Elizabeth class of aircraft carriers, the largest warships ever built for the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom and capable of carrying up to 60 aircraft. She is named in honour of the first Queen Elizabeth, a renowned World War I era super-dreadnought, which in turn was named after Queen Elizabeth I. The new Queen Elizabeth will carry her namesake's honours, as well as her Tudor rose-adorned crest and motto.

The ship began sea trials in June 2017 and was commissioned on 7 December 2017. Her first Commanding Officer is Commodore Jerry Kyd, who had previously commanded the carriers HMS Ark Royal and HMS Illustrious. As Captain of HMS Queen Elizabeth, Kyd will wear the Royal Navy rank of Captain while retaining the substantive rank of Commodore.

Queen Elizabeth has no catapults or arrestor wires and is instead designed to operate V/STOL aircraft; the air wing will typically consist of F-35B Lightning II multirole fighters and Merlin helicopters for airborne early warning and anti-submarine warfare. The design emphasises flexibility, with accommodation for 250 Royal Marines and the ability to support them with attack helicopters and large troop transports such as Chinooks. She is the second Royal Navy vessel to bear the name Queen Elizabeth and is based at HMNB Portsmouth.

On 25 July 2007, the then Defence Secretary Des Browne, announced the order for two new carriers. At the time of approval the first carrier was expected to enter service in July 2015 and the budget was £4.085b for two ships. The financial crisis led to a political decision in December 2008 to slow production, delaying Queen Elizabeth until May 2016. This added £1.560b to the cost. By March 2010 the budget was estimated at £5.900b and in November 2013 the contract was renegotiated with a budget of £6,200m. The in-service date was further extended to 2020 in the Strategic Defence and Security Review in October 2010.

Construction of Queen Elizabeth began in 2009. The assembly took place in the Firth of Forth at Rosyth Dockyard from nine blocks built in six UK shipyards: BAE Systems Surface Ships in Glasgow, Babcock at Appledore, Babcock at Rosyth, A&P Tyne in Hebburn, BAE at Portsmouth and Cammell Laird (flight decks) at Birkenhead. Two of the lower main blocks, together weighing more than 6,000 tonnes and forming part of the base of the ship, were assembled and joined into one piece on 30 June 2011. On 16 August 2011, the 8,000-tonne Lower Block 03 of Queen Elizabeth left BAE Systems Surface Ships' Govan shipyard in Glasgow on a large ocean-going barge. Travelling 600 miles (970 km) around the northern coast of Scotland, the block arrived at Rosyth on the evening of 20 August 2011. On 28 October 2012, an 11,000-tonne section of the carrier began a lengthy journey around the south coast of England, avoiding bad weather from the shipbuilding hall at Govan to the Rosyth dockyard; it arrived on 21 November. The forward island was constructed at BAE Portsmouth and attached on 14 March 2013; the aft island was attached in June 2013. The ski jump was added in November 2013, leaving just the elevators and radar to be lifted into place. By September 2013 Queen Elizabeth was 80% complete internally. A journalist reported that computers on the vessel appeared to be using Windows XP, which had raised concerns about its vulnerability to a cyberattack, but the source of the confusion was later revealed to be a laptop in use by a contractor.

She is two and a half times the size of the Invincible-class, and has the ability to carry approximately three times as many aircraft. Despite this, Queen Elizabeth has marginally fewer crew than the Invincible-class. She is approximately three times as large as HMS Ocean. The ship has two superstructures, or islands, one for navigation and ship's operations and the other for flight control and aerial operations. The islands can take on each other's function in an emergency.

The two ships of the Queen Elizabeth class are each expected to be capable of carrying forty aircraft, a maximum of thirty-six F-35s and four helicopters. The 2010 SDSR anticipated the routine peacetime deployment of twelve F-35Bs, but a typical warload will be 24 F-35Bs and some helicopters. These could be a Maritime Force Protection package of nine anti-submarine Merlin HM2 and five Merlin Crowsnest for airborne early warning; alternatively a Littoral Manoeuvre package could include a mix of Royal Navy Commando Helicopter Force Merlin HC4, Wildcat AH1, RAF Chinooks, and Army Air Corps Apaches. As of September 2013 six landing spots are planned, but the deck could be marked out for the operation of ten medium helicopters at once, allowing the lift of a company of 250 troops. The hangars are designed for CH-47 Chinook operations without blade folding and for the V-22 Osprey tiltrotor, whilst the aircraft lifts can accommodate two Chinooks with unfolded blades.

The two ships of the Queen Elizabeth class will each carry four passenger transfer boats (PTBs) made by Blyth-based company Alnmaritec. Each PTB carries 36 passengers and two crew to operate the vessel. The first boat named is named Swordfish, after the World War II-era aircraft of that name. The boat is 13.1 m long and davit-launched. To enable the craft to fit into the docking area the navigation and radar masts are fitted with Linak actuators so that they can be lowered automatically from the command console. The enclosed cabin is heated and there is a set of heads forward. The second of the four PTBs is named Buccaneer after the Blackburn Buccaneer, and the third is Sea Vixen, named after the De Havilland Sea Vixen.

Defensive weapons include the Phalanx Close-In Weapons System for anti-aircraft and anti-missile defence, and 30mm Automated Small Calibre Guns and Miniguns for use against fast attack craft. She would be escorted into high risk areas by the Type 45 Destroyer, which was made specially to fulfil this role. In lower risk situations, frigates or even patrol vessels may be used instead.

Incorporated into the first two blocks is a sophisticated handling and deployment system for air weapons, with the aim of achieving a sortie generation rate which is about six times faster than any previous Royal Navy aircraft carrier. The system requires only 50 people and could be operated with as few as 12 in an emergency; it is estimated that 160 would be needed to produce the same efficiency with conventional equipment. The system moves munitions on pallets by means of remotely controlled electric vehicles and lifts.

(Gibraltar 2018, £3, StG.?)
Internet

TRAKAI CASTLE BRIDGE

For the Europa issues, Litauen issued two stamps in 2018 of 0.75 Euro, by the stamp with the Trakai Castle Bridge the Litauen Post gives.

Trakai Castle Bridge - a pedestrian bridge on Lake Galvė leading to one of the larger islands - Castle Island in Trakai. The bridge connecting the city with the castle consists of two parts, among which the Karaim or Cowan Island.

There are some medieval type vessels depict in the foreground of which I think by looking to the rigging that the small vessel on the left of the stamp is a “kurenas” see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8754
On the right of the stamp two ships of the “maasilinn” type are depict see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14743

Litauen 2018 0.75 Euro sg?, scott?

MAIL TRANSPORT PORTUGAL

For the 25 Anniversary van het Ministry of Transport in 1973 Portugal issued three stamps which shows us mail transports, on the 6$00 stamp which shows us a stylized vessel which looks like a ro-ro vessel. Have not any info on the ship.

Portugal 1973 6e00 sg?, scott?

MERIDIANAS

Litauen issued in 2018 two Europa stamps which shows us bridges of that country both are 0.75 Euro.
The stamp which shows us a stamp with a bridge in Klaipeda, is the Birzos Bridge, in the background is a cruise vessel of which I have not any information, the light tower is the rear leading light tower of the port.
In front of the bridge is a tall ship, which is the MERIDIANAS homeported in Klaipeda and used as a floating restaurant vessel in 2018.

Built as a wooden hulled training ship under yard No 5 by Oy Laivateollisuus Ab shipyard in Turkey, Finland for the Ministry of Fisheries in Moscow.
22 February 1947 laid down.
10 June 1948 launched as the MERIDIAN, two sisters the SEKSTANT and TROPIK.
Tonnage 322 brt, 41 nrt, 55 dwt., dim. 39.40 x 8.90 x 3.40m. (draught)
Powered with an auxiliary 2-stroke diesel engine, speed with engine 6.5 knots.
Barquentine rigged.
30 August 1948 completed.
01 October 1948 delivered to the Soviet Union.

After Finland signed a peace treaty with the Soviet Union on 19 September 1944 Finland agreed war reparations under which building of vessels for the Soviet Union, one of this vessels was the MERIDIAN.
03 May 1949 the Maritime School of Klaipeda receives the training vessel, her name was then MERIDIANAS.
1954 She joins the Baltic training fleet, thereafter she was used for training voyages with trainees from Kaliningrad, Riga and Klaipeda maritime schools.
1968 In the aftermath of an accident MERIDIANAS is deleted from the list of active training ships and moved to Klaipeda.
1970 She is handed over to the Public Trust of Eateries, Restaurants and Cafés of Klaipeda.
1971 A restaurant was opened on board of the MERIDIANAS.
1994 Was she privatised.
2001 For a token of 1 Litas she was sold, and a support fund was founded for the sailing ship MERIDIANAS, a symbol of the maritime city Klaipeda, which took over the management of the ship.
Early October 2012 the then head of the Fund applies to the Government of Litauen for a permit to sink the MERIDIANAS in the territorial waters of Litauen. The reason not any money is available for the repair and restauration of the vessel.
19 October 2012 the ship was handed over to Aloyzas Kuzmarskis and Aidas Kaveckis with intention to overhaul and repair the barquentine, she was moved to the Western Shipyard (AB Klasipédos laivu remontas AB) where she docked on 10 November 2012, and repair work on her hull commenced.
09 November 2013 after repaired and restoration she was moved to her permanent location at the embankment of the Dane River behind the Birzos Bridge.
19 July 2014 her sail were hoisted again for the first time after the restoration, and she is handed back to the city of Klaipeda.
18 December 2014 management is taken over by Friedrich pazazas.
2018 She is still in Klaipeda and a restaurant and bar are operating on board.

Source: http://www.restoranasmeridianas.lt/en/h ... ackground/ and internet.
Litauen 2018 0.75 Euro sg?, scott?

HAMINA-CLASS fast attack craft

This Finish stamp shows us one of the Hamina-class fast attack craft, the stamp shows not a pennant no, that one of this class of four ships is depict.

All four were built by Aker Finnyard in Rauma, Finland for the Finnish Navy.
Displacement 250 tons, dim. 51 x 8.5 x 1.7m. (draught).
Powered by two MTU 16V 538 TB93 diesel engines 5,520 kW, two Rolls Royce Kamewa 90SII waterjets. Speed over 30 knots., range 500 mile.
Armament: 1 – Bofors 57mm/70 SAK Mk3, 2 – 12.7mm M.G. 8 Umkhonto-IR SAM (Denel), 4 – RRS-15 Mk2 SSM (Saab), 1 rail for depth charges or mines (sea mine 2000)
Crew 26.

The Hamina-class missile boat is a class of fast attack craft of the Finnish Navy. They are classified as "missile fast attack craft" or ohjusvene, literally "missile boat" in Finnish.
History
The vessels were built in the late 1990s, early 2000s, and are the fourth generation of Finnish missile craft. The first vessel was ordered in December 1996 and the fourth was handed over on 19 June 2006. Since the launch of the Helsinki-class missile boats, all fast attack craft have been named after Finnish coastal cities. The class was previously known also as Rauma 2000 following its predecessor the Rauma class.
The four vessels form what the Finnish Navy calls Squadron 2000 (Finnish: Laivue 2000). Initially the Finnish Navy considered several different compositions for the new squadron, and at one point only two Hamina-class vessels and four Tuuli-class ACV were to have been built. After a strategic shift of the Finnish Navy's role, the composition of the Squadron 2000 followed suit. The Tuuli-class prototype was never fully equipped, nor fitted for operational use and its three sisters were cancelled, instead two more Hamina-class boats have been built; with some of the equipment intended for the Tuulis being used in the Haminas. The fourth and final Hamina-class vessel was delivered in summer 2006.
The squadron reached its full operational capability in 2008 and have greatly improved the surface- and air surveillance as well as air defense capability of the Finnish Navy. Their electronic surveillance suite also increases the quality of information available to military leaders.
All ships were built at Aker Finnyards in Rauma, Finland. The vessels have their home base at Upinniemi.
In March 2014 it was announced that the Hamina-class missile boats will be upgraded in the near future.
MLU (Mid-Life Update
In January 2018, it was announced that the vessels will be equipped initially With Torped 45 and later with Torped 47 torpedoes. It was also announced that new Bofors 40mm Mk.4 guns had been selected as part of the MLU upgrade.
In February it was announced that Finland intended to buy RGM-84Q-4 Harpoon Block II missiles for the Haminas.
Design
The vessel's hull is constructed of aluminum and the superstructures are constructed of re-enforced carbon fiber composite. The vessels have a very low displacement and are very maneuverable. They are equipped with water jets instead of propellers, which allow them to operate in very shallow waters and accelerate, slow down and turn in unconventional ways.
The Hamina class are very potent vessels, boasting surveillance and firepower capacities which are usually found in ships twice the size.
Stealth technology
The Hamina class has been designed and constructed as stealth ships with minimal magnetic, heat and radar signatures.
The shape of the vessel has been designed to reduce radar signature. Metal parts have been covered with radar absorbent material, and the composite parts have radar absorbent material embedded in the structure. Radar transparent materials have been used where applicable.
Unlike glass fiber, carbon fiber blocks radio waves. This protects ship's electronics against electromagnetic pulse. In addition, it stops any radio frequency signals generated by ships electronic devices escaping outside. Except for the bridge, the vessel has no windows that would allow the signals to escape.
The vessel contains hardly any steel parts, thus generating very low magnetic field. The remaining magnetic field is actively canceled with electromagnets.
Exhaust gases can be directed underwater to minimize thermal signature, or up in the air to minimize sound in submarines direction. 50 nozzles around the decks and upper structures can be used to spray seawater on the vessel to cool it. In addition, the nozzles can be used to clean the ship after chemical attack or radioactive fall-out.
Weapons
The Hamina class have the latest in surveillance and weapons technology all integrated into an intelligent command system. A Hamina class vessel can monitor about 200 kilometres (120 mi) of air space and its Umkhonto surface-to-air missile system can simultaneously engage a maximum of eight aircraft, up to 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) away, while the vessel's anti-ship missiles have a range in excess of over 250 kilometres (160 mi).
The Hamina class' primary weaponry is four RBS-15 Mk.3 anti-ship missiles. The vessels are further equipped with a Bofors 57 mm gun against surface and aerial targets as well as the Umkhonto-IR surface-to-air missiles, MASS decoy system and two 12.7 mm heavy machine guns. It is also possible to use the ships for mine-laying.
The software of the centralized combat control system is COTS oriented, built on top of Linux running on redundant x86 rack servers, which makes maintenance and future updates and optimizations simpler.
In early 2018, Finland announced the mid-life upgrade program, which will equip all four boats in the class with new Swedish lightweight anti-submarine warfare torpedoes in the years 2023-2025 and extend the life of the boats to 2035

Vessels
FNS HAMINA
Pennant number: 80
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: December 1996
Commissioned: 24 August 1998
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service.
FNS TORNIO
Pennant number: 81
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 15 February 2001
Commissioned: 12 May 2003
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service
FNS HANKO
Pennant number: 82
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 3 December 2003
Commissioned: 22 June 2005
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service
FNS PORI
Pennant number: 83
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 15 February 2005
Commissioned: 19 June 2006
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamina-class_missile_boat

Finland 2018 sg?, scott
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

T-class INS DAKAR (77)

The full index of our ship stamp archive

T-class INS DAKAR (77)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Fri Dec 15, 2017 8:43 pm

T klasse.jpg
Click image to view full size
ins dakar 2.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built by H.M. Dockyard Devonport as HMS TOTEM (P 352) for the Royal Navy, laid down:22 October 1942, launched:28 September 1943.
Displacement:1,290 tons surfaced, 1,560 tons submerged, length:276’ 6” (84.28 m.) beam:25’ 6” (7.77 m.) draught: 12’ 9” (3.89 m.) forward, 14’ 7” (4.45 m.) aft.
Twin diesel engines:2,500 hp. (1.86 MW) each, Twin electric motors:1,450 hp. (1.08 MW) each, 2 shafts, 15.5 kn. surfaced, 9 kn. submerged, range:4,500 nm. at 11 kn. surfaced
Test depth:300’ (91 m.) max. Complement:61.
Armament:6 internal forward-facing torpedo tubes, 2 external forward-facing torpedo tubes, 2 external amidships rear-facing torpedo tubes, 1 external rear-facing torpedo tubes
6 reload torpedoes, 1-QF 4” (100 mm.) deck gun, 3 anti-aircraft machine guns.

HMS TOTEM was built to the group 3 variant of the T class design at HM Dockyard Devonport and launched on 28 September 1943. The submarine was completed and commissioned in early 1945. After the end of World War II, TOTEM and the other surviving group 3 boats were equipped with submarine snorkels to allow longer periods of operation underwater. Between 1951 and 1953, TOTEM was one of eight boats converted to the "Super T" design, which allowed the vessel higher speed and quieter underwater operation.

In 1965, TOTEM was purchased by Israel, along with two of her T-class sister boats, TRUNCHEON and TURPIN. The former TOTEM was commissioned into the Israeli Navy on 10 November 1967 as INS DAKAR (דקר), (English: Swordfish), under the command of Major Ya'acov Ra'anan.

DAKAR left the shipyard for Scotland to conduct her sea and dive trials. Late in 1967, after two successful months of trials, DAKAR returned to Portsmouth, England and left for Israel on 9 January 1968.

After leaving England, DAKAR put into Gibraltar on the morning of 15 January, departing at midnight and proceeded across the Mediterranean Sea on snorkel. She reported her position by radio to submarine headquarters in Haifa and was expected to enter her home base on Friday, 2 February, but as she was making excellent time, averaging over eight knots, Ra'anan requested permission to enter port earlier. He was ordered to enter on 29 January. Later, Ra'anan requested to enter a day earlier, on 28 January. This request was denied, the scheduled welcoming ceremony could not be moved.

At 06:10 on 24 January DAKAR transmitted her position, 34.16°N 26.26°E, just east of Crete. Over the next 18 hours she sent three control transmissions, which did not include her position, the last at 00:02 25 January 1968. No further transmissions were received.

On 26 January the British Admiralty reported the submarine was missing and gave the last known position as 100 miles (160 km) west of Cyprus. An international search and rescue operation began, including units from Israel, the United States, Greece, Turkey, Britain and Lebanon. Although Haifa Navy radio began broadcasting calls to commercial vessels to be on the look out for the DAKAR, Israeli officials would not admit the submarine was missing. On 27 January, a radio station in Nicosia, Cyprus, received a distress call on the frequency of DAKAR's emergency buoy, apparently from south-east of Cyprus, but no further traces of the submarine were found. On 31 January, all non-Israeli forces abandoned their search at sunset. Israeli forces continued the search for another four days, giving up at sundown on 4 February 1968.

Israel denied that the DAKAR sank as the result of hostile action and stated that the DAKAR was involved in crash diving exercises on its return voyage and was lost, probably as a result of a mechanical failure. On 25 April 1968, Vice Admiral Abraham Botzer, commander of the Israeli Navy, stated that the DAKAR sank on 24 January 1968, two days before being reported missing, due to "technical or human malfunctioning" ruled out "foul play".

On 9 February 1969, over a year after DAKAR went missing, a fisherman found her stern emergency buoy marker washed up on the coast of Khan Yunis, a town southwest of Gaza. British T-class submarines had two such buoy markers, bow and stern, secured behind wooden doors in cages under the deck and attached to the submarine with metal cables 200 meters (650 ft) long. Experts examining the 65 cm (two feet) of cable still attached to the buoy determined that the buoy had remained attached to the submarine for most of the preceding year until the cable broke completely, that DAKAR rested in depth between 150 and 326 meters, and that she was 50–70 nmi (93–130 km) off her planned route. All of these determinations were wrong, and misled searchers for decades. It was not until April 1999 and some 25 failed expeditions later that a search effort was concentrated along the path of the original route.

On 1 January 1970, the Egyptian newspaper Al Akhbar reported that the DAKAR had been sunk by an Egyptian warship with depth charges. The Egyptian story was told in a 2 July 2005 interview by Asharq Al-Awsat with General Mohamed Azab (major at that time):
On 23 January 1968, the Egyptian frigate, ASSYOUT, left Alexandria base in a training mission for the naval academy. After completing the training assignment and during the return journey to the base; students noticed the periscope of an alien submarine roaming in Egyptian waters, about two miles (3 km) off Alexandria. The Egyptian commander was informed and the decision was taken to attack the unknown submarine. However, the submarine made a very quick and hasty dive and the Egyptian ship lost its trace. General Azab reported the story to his commanders and mentioned that there is a probability that the submarine had crashed into the seabed. However, the story was not believed by the higher Egyptian commanders and there was no sufficient evidence to start a search process. General Azab mentioned that the submarine may have crashed into the seabed due to the shallow depth of water in that region, about 36 meters, while it needed at least 40 meters to dive, however, it appears that the submarine commander decided to take the risk.
The Israeli government stated there was no evidence to substantiate the Egyptian unofficial charges.

During the 1980's the Israelis, using a salvage vessel with Egyptian liaison officers, conducted three searches to look for the DAKAR in waters north of Sinai and another search off the Greek island of Rhodes. In August 1986, the U.S. Navy committed a P-3 Orion marine reconnaissance and a S-3 anti-submarine warfare aircraft for a search of Egyptian waters near al-Arish. In October 1998, Israel began running advertisements in newspapers in Turkey, Egypt, France, Greece and Russia offering rewards of up to $300,000 for any information on the fate of the DAKAR.

On 24 May 1999 a joint U.S.–Israeli search team using information received from U.S. intelligence sources and led by subcontractor Thomas Kent Dettweiler of the American Nauticos Corporation, detected a large body on the seabed between Crete and Cyprus, at a depth of some 3,000 meters (9,800 ft). On 28 May the first video pictures were taken by the remote operated vehicle REMORA II, making it clear that DAKAR had been found. She rests on her keel, bow to the northwest. Her conning tower was snapped off and fallen over the side. The stern of the submarine, with the propellers and dive planes, broke off aft of the engine room and rests beside the main hull.

During October 2000 a survey of the DAKAR wreckage and the wreckage site was undertaken by Nauticos corporation and the Israeli navy; some artifacts were recovered, including the submarine's bridge, the boat's gyrocompass and many small items.

The exact cause of the loss is unknown, but it appears that no emergency measures had been taken before DAKAR dove rapidly through her maximum depth, suffered a catastrophic hull rupture, and continued her plunge to the bottom. The emergency buoy was released by the violence of the hull collapse, and drifted for a year before washing ashore.

Sisterships: INS DOLPHIN (ex HMS TRUNCHEON P 353)
Built by Devonport Dockyard, laid down:5 November 1942, launched:22 February 1944, commissioned:25 May 1945,same specifications, sold to Israeli Navy in 1968, scrapped in 1977.

INS LEVIATHAN (ex HMS TURPIN P 354)
Built by Chatham Dockyard, laid down:24 May 1943, launched:5 August 1943, commissioned:18 December 1944, same specifications, sold to Israeli Navy in 1965, scrapped in 1978.

(Israel 2017, 2.50 sh. StG.?)
Internet.
D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen
 
Posts: 769
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:46 pm

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen and 34 guests

cron