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T-CLASS submarine

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T-CLASS submarine

Postby aukepalmhof » Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:15 pm

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This stamp shows us a T Class submarine of the Israeli Navy, three vessel of this class were bought from the Royal Navy the HMS TRUNCHEON, TOTEM and TURPIN renamed by the Israeli Navy in DOLPHIN, DAKAR and LEVIATHAN. The Israeli Post gives by this stamp:

T Class Submarine, 1967
Based on its experience to that point, it was decided that the Navy should acquire newer submarines, the T Class, which were also British-made. The second in the series, the INS Dakar, sank in-route to Israel with its entire crew of 69 on board. The cause remains a mystery to this day. The Navy subsequently decided not to purchase any more used submarines, but rather to order new ones.

LEVIATHAN:
Built as a submarine by the Chatham Dockyard for the Royal Navy.
24 May 1943 keel laid down.
05 August 1944 launched as the HMS TURPIN (P-354) one of the T-Class.
Displacement 1,290 tons surfaced, 1,560 tons submerged, dim. 84.28 x 7.77 x 3.89m. (draught forward.)
Powered by two Admiralty diesel engines, 2,500 hp. and two electro motors 1,450 hp., twin shafts, speed 15.5 knots surface and 9 knots submerged.
Range by a speed of 11 knots 4,500 mile, submerged ?
Test depth 91 metre.
Armament 6 – 21 inch internal forward facing torpedo tubes, 2 external forward facing torpedo tubes, 2 external amidships rear-facing torpedo tubes and 1 external rear-facing torpedo tube, carried 6 reload torpedoes. I QF 4 inch deck gun and 3 AA machine guns.
Crew 61.
18 December 1944 commissioned.

HMS TURPIN (pennant number P354) was one a group three T-class submarines of the Royal Navy which entered service in the last few months of World War II. So far she has been the only ship of the Royal Navy to be named TURPIN. She was sold to Israel in 1965 and commissioned into the Israeli Sea Corps in 1967 as INS LEVIATHAN.
Career
As HMS TURPIN
At the end of the war, all surviving Group 1 and Group 2 boats were scrapped, but the group 3 boats (which were of welded rather than riveted construction) were retained and fitted with snort masts. In 1955, TURPIN was inside the arctic circle on an ELINT mission, listening for specific frequency bands of Soviet radars. Suddenly, the ELINT specialist noted an unusual signal that was from a very short range radar. The operator registered that they were about to be rammed by a Soviet Navy surface vessel, and a crash dive was ordered. The TURPIN submerged below a cold water line which allowed them to evade Soviet sonar and escape TURPIN was sold to the Israeli Navy in 1965, and renamed LEVIATHAN, after a biblical sea monster.
As INS LEVIATHAN
The submarine was purchased by Israel, along with two of her T-class sisters, in 1965, HMS TRUNCHEON and HMS TOTEM. She was commissioned into the Israeli Sea Corps in 1967.
25 May 1967 she left Scotland for her nonstop voyage to Israel. In the night of 25 and 26 May she lost two crew who were doing some deck work and were washed overboard in the Irish Sea.
She was eventually scrapped in 1978. A Dolphin class submarine named LEVIATHAN was commissioned in 2000 to the Israeli Navy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Turpin_(P354)

DAKAR:
Built as a submarine by H.M. Dockyard Devonport for the Royal Navy.
22 October 1942 laid down.
28 September 1943 launched as the HMS TOTEM one of the T-Class.
Details the same as the HMS TURPIN.
19 January 1945 commissioned.

HMS TOTEM was a Group 3 T-class submarine of the Royal Navy which entered service in the last few months of World War II. To-date, she is the only ship of the Royal Navy to have been named TOTEM.
TOTEM was sold to Israel in 1965 and commissioned into the Israeli Sea Corps in 1967 as INS DAKAR. She sank whilst on passage from the United Kingdom to Israel in January
The submarine was presented with a TOTEM pole by the Cowichan Tribes in 1945, which was stolen during the 1950s when the boat was visiting Halifax, Canada. The pole was fitted to the front of the bridge fin when the submarine was in harbour.
At the end of the war, all surviving T-class Group 1 and Group 2 boats were scrapped, but the Group 3 boats (which were of welded rather than riveted construction) were retained and fitted with snorkel masts.
In January 1948 it was formally acknowledged that the main operational function of the British submarine fleet would now be to intercept Soviet submarines slipping out of their bases in Northern Russia to attack British and Allied merchant vessels. The following April, the Assistant Chief of Naval Staff, Rear-Admiral Geoffrey Oliver circulated a paper in which he proposed that British submarines take a more offensive role by attacking Soviet submarines off the Northern Russian coast and mining the waters in the area. With the surface fleet dramatically reduced following the end of the Second World War, he commented that this was one of the few methods the Royal Navy had for "getting to the enemy on his home ground".
To fulfil this new role, TOTEM was one of eight boats which were extensively modified to become "super T-conversions", giving them higher speed and quieter operation underwater. Five further T-class submarines were given much less extensive streamlining improvements.
The work on TOTEM was done between 1951 and May 1953 at Chatham Dockyard (which carried out all eight super T-conversions), and involved inserting an additional hull section 14 feet (4.3 m) long to accommodate extra switchgear and an extra pair of electric motors and replacing the batteries. The hull was streamlined, which included the removal of the deck gun and the replacement of the bridge fin with one which was taller, enclosing the periscopes and masts. The radar and sonar were updated at the same time. After the submarine had returned to service, her top speed exceeded 18 knots (33 km/h), aided by the unofficial removal in the dockyard at Malta of the housing for the airguard radar aerial which added 3/4 knot to her top speed.
Her captain at the time, Commander John Coote, reported that the modifications made evading her hunters during exercises easy, since the submarine could cover a mile in four minutes at 18 knots (33 km/h), and following another ten minutes running silently at 12 knots (22 km/h) could be 3 miles (4.8 km) away from the escort.
In 1953 she took part in the Fleet Review to celebrate the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
INS DAKAR
The submarine was purchased by Israel in 1965, along with two of her T-class sisters – TRUNCHEON and TURPIN. She was commissioned into the Israeli Sea Corps on 10 November 1967 as INS DAKAR (דקר, Grouper) under the command of Lieutenant Commander Ya'acov Ra'anan.
On 9 January 1968, DAKAR departed from Portsmouth for Haifa. On the morning of the 15th, DAKAR put into Gibraltar, departing at midnight, and proceeded across the Mediterranean Sea underwater using her snorkel mast. Her last position report was at 0610 on 24 January, when she gave a location just east of Crete. There were three further routine messages which did not provide a position, the last being at 0002 on 25 January.
Despite an extensive search, no trace was found of the vessel. Her stern emergency marker buoy washed ashore on the coast of Khan Yunis, an Arab town southwest of Gaza, just over a year later, on 9 February 1969.
The wreck was finally discovered on 24 May 1999 at a depth of 3,000 meters (9,800 ft). The precise cause of the accident is not known, but as no emergency measures appear to have been carried out. It appears that the submarine dived suddenly and rapidly past her maximum depth limit and suffered a catastrophic hull rupture. The emergency buoy was released by the violence of the hull collapse, and washed ashore after drifting for a year.
On 11 October 2000, DAKAR’s bridge and the forward edge of her sail were raised, and now stand as a memorial in the Clandestine Immigration and Naval Museum in Haifa.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_TOTEM_(P352)

DOLPHIN: Built as a submarine by the HM Dockyard Devonport for the Royal Navy.
05 November 1942 laid down.
22 February 1944 launched as the HMS TRUNCHEON one of the T-Class.
Details the same as the TURPIN.
25 May 1945 commissioned.

HMS TRUNCHEON (pennant number P353) was a group three T Class submarine of the Royal Navy which entered service in the last few months of World War II. So far she has been the only ship of the Royal Navy to be named TRUNCHEON. She was sold to Israel in 1968[1] and commissioned into the Israeli Sea Corps as INS DOLPHIN.[1]
As HMS TRUNCHEON
At the end of the war, all surviving Group 1 and Group 2 boats were scrapped, but the group 3 boats (which were of welded rather than riveted construction), were retained and fitted with snorkel masts.
TRUNCHEON was sold to the Israeli Navy in 1968, and renamed DOLPHIN.
As INS DOLPHIN
The submarine was purchased by Israel in 1968.[1] Two of her T-class sisters, HMS Turpin and HMS Totem, were also sold to Israel. She was commissioned into the Israeli Sea Corps in 1968.
She was eventually scrapped in 1977. By the time of her decommissioning, she was the only T class submarine in service in the world. The lead boat of the new DOLPHIN class submarine commissioned in 1999 carried on the name DOLPHIN.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Truncheon_(P353)
Israel 2017 2.50s sg?, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
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