SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

FORWARD brig + Jules Verne

For the 100th anniversary of the death of Jules Verne (1828-1905). Liberia issued a miniature sheet in 2005, which show on 1 stamp the brig FORWARD in the ice. The book gives she was 170 ton, and also fitted out with an auxiliary steam engine.

The Adventures of Captain Hatteras (French: Voyages et aventures du capitaine Hatteras) is an adventure novel by Jules Verne in two parts: The English at the North Pole (French: Les Anglais au pôle nord) and The desert of ice (French: Le Désert de glace).
The novel was published for the first time in 1864. The definitive version from 1866 was included into Voyages Extraordinaires series (The Extraordinary Voyages). Although it was the first book of the series it was labeled as number two. Three of Verne's books from 1863-65 (Five Weeks in a Balloon, Journey to the Center of the Earth, and From the Earth to the Moon) were added into the series retroactively. Captain Hatteras shows many similarities with British explorer John Franklin.

Plot summary
The novel, set in 1861, described adventures of British expedition led by Captain John Hatteras to the North Pole. Hatteras is convinced that the sea around the pole is not frozen and his obsession is to reach the place no matter what. Mutiny by the crew results in destruction of their ship but Hatteras, with a few men, continues on the expedition. On the shore of the island of "New America" he discovers the remains of a ship used by the previous expedition from the United States. Doctor Clawbonny recalls in mind the plan of the real Ice palace, constructed completely from ice in Russia in 1740 to build a snow-house, where they should spend a winter. The travelers winter on the island and survive mainly due to the ingenuity of Doctor Clawbonny (who is able to make fire with an ice lens, make bullets from frozen mercury and repel attacks by polar bears with remotely controlled explosions of black powder).
When the winter ends the sea becomes ice-free. The travelers build a boat from the shipwreck and head towards the pole. Here they discover an island, an active volcano, and name it after Hatteras. With difficulty a fjord is found and the group get ashore. After three hours climbing they reach the mouth of the volcano. The exact location of the pole is in the crater and Hatteras jumps into it. As the sequence was originally written, Hatteras perishes in the crater; Verne's editor, Jules Hetzel, suggested or rather required that Verne do a rewrite so that Hatteras survives but is driven insane by the intensity of the experience, and after return to England he is put into an asylum for the insane. Losing his "soul" in the cavern of the North Pole, Hatteras never speaks another word. He spends the remainder of his days walking the streets surrounding the asylum with his faithful dog Duke. While mute and deaf to the world, Hatteras' walks are not without a direction. As indicated by the last line "Captain Hatteras forever marches northward".

New America
New America is the name given to a large Arctic island, a northward extension of Ellesmere Island, as discovered by Captain John Hatteras and his crew. Its features include, on the west coast, Victoria Bay, Cape Washington, Johnson Island, Bell Mountain, and Fort Providence, and at its northern point (87°5′N 118°35′W87.083°N 118.583°W), Altamont Harbour.

As with many of Verne's imaginative creations, his description of Arctic geography was based on scientific knowledge at the time the novel was written (1866) but foreshadowed future discoveries. Ellesmere Island had been re-discovered and named by Edward Inglefield in 1852 and further explored by Isaac Israel Hayes in 1860-61. Forty years after the novel's publication, in 1906, Robert Peary claimed to have sighted Crocker Land around 83° N, and in 1909, Frederick Cook sighted Bradley Land at 85° N, both at locations occupied by Verne's New America. Cook's choice of route may actually have been inspired by his reading of Verne/
The land is named by Captain Altamont, an American explorer, who is first to set foot on the land. In the novel as published, it is unclear whether New America is meant to be a territorial claim for the United States. As William Butcher points out, this would not be surprising, since Verne wrote about the US acquisition of Alaska in The Fur Country, and Lincoln Island is proposed as a US possession in The Mysterious Island.[2] In fact, a deleted chapter, "John Bull and Jonathan," had Hatteras and Altamont dueling for the privilege of claiming the land for their respective countries.
Adaptation

In 1912, Georges Méliès made a film based on the story entitled Conquest of the Pole (French: Conquête du pôle).

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adven ... n_Hatteras
Liberia 2005 sg?, scott 2333a.

LIBYAN ANCIENT SHIPS issue 1983

Libya issued six stamps in 1983 to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of the Internationale Maritime Organization, The stamps show ancient types of ships which have been sailing in the Mediterranean.

Phoenician berime 100dh sg1303, scott 1090 viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11213&p=11918&hilit=phoenician#p11918

Ancient Greek penteconter war galley 100dh sg 1304, scott 1092. https://www.militaryfactory.com/ancient ... enteconter

Ancient Pharaoh Egyptian ship 100dh sg1305, scott 1095. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14305&p=16144&hilit=ancient+Egyptian+ship#p16144

Roman trading ship 100 dh sg1306 scott 1093. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10015&p=10398&hilit=roman+trading+ship#p10398

Viking longship 100 dh sg1307, scott1091. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10360&p=10855&hilit=viking+longship#p10855

Libyan xebec rigged ship 100dh sg 1308, scott1094.
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10503&p=11928#p11928

Libya 1983 sg 1303/08. Scott 1090/95.

Admiral Ibrahim Pasha and Egyptian fleet

For the 100th anniversary of the death of Ibrahim Pasha (1789-1848) Egypt issued 1 stamp of 10M which shows on the right a portrait of Admiral Ibrahim Pasha with on the left what is believed the Egyptian fleet, Stanley Gibbons gives that it shows the “Battle of Navarino in 1827”.
Wikipedia has the following on Admiral Ibrahim Pasha: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibrahim_Pasha_of_Egypt

Egypt 1948 10m sg 351, scott 272.

paddlesteamer

Yugoslavia issued in 1997 a miniature sheet for the National Stamp Exhibition JUFN XI in Belgrado, the MS shows in the top margin a paddle steamer on which I have not any information.

Yugoslavia 1997 5ND sgMS?, scott?

MANGAREVAN ISLAND CANOE TIPAIRUA

Stanley Gibbons give for this stamp issued by Pitcairn Island in 1967 a “mangarevan canoe”, Mangarevan is the largest island of the Gambier Group in French Polynesia and the canoe she were using is the “tipairua”.

Mangarevan is the island which has now regular boat connection with Pitcairn Island.
Taratahi c 1325 also given on the stamp, the English meaning is “Isolated” and it is a Maori word, a google search give many names with taratahi in New Zealand but not in a connection with Pitcairn Island.

Tipairua was used in the Society Islands and eastern Pacific, is a double hulled traveling canoe used mostly by local chiefs for short and medium-length voyages.
The tipairua canoe is now extinct.
She differed from similar craft of the islands by the flat horizontal pieces that projected forward as much as 1.5 – 1.8m. from the hulls themselves and the sharply rising stern; generally topped by a tall vertical ornamentation. Basal dugout hulls raised by two broad sewn strakes in short lengths; deep U in cross section. Straight or slightly concave cutwater; bottoms had slight rocker at the bows, but sterns swept up 4.6-5.5m. above water level. Stern decorations were carved cylinders, square pieces, or carved grotesque figures’ bow sometimes carried low decorations. The number of crosspieces connecting the two hulls varied as to position and number, with as many as 18 in some cases. They were evenly spaced or clustered at the ends with more widely spaced pieces under the hut that spanned the 2 hulls. Bow ends enclosed, terminating in breakwaters.
Stepped 1 or 2 vertical masts one well forward, the 2nd forward of amidships and abaft the hut. Tall vertical mat sail; yard extended along the foot and up the leech, recurving at the top well forward of the mast. Also paddled. Steered with a paddle.
Reported lengths 9 – 24 m. beam 0.6m (must be the beam of 1 dugout). Depths 0.9 – 1.2m.
(The stamp shows a canoe without a hut, so most probably only used for short voyages.)

Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
Pitcairn Island 1967 ½p sg 64, scott ?

RUM RUNNER party boat

IN 2018 two party boats were around in Grenada, the RUM RUNNER 1 and II which carries the name RHUM RUNNER now. When the stamp was issued she carried the name RUM RUNNER. I believe the photo shows the same vessel now renamed and with some alternations. Maybe also a new owner.

Both are barge like vessel with some accommodation for day and night party trips around Grenada fuelled with booze.

Not any info on the RUM RUNNER where built, when and tonnage and dimensions.

Grenada 1980 $3 sg 1097A scott?
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Battle between HMS Frolic and U.S.S.Wasp 1812

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Battle between HMS Frolic and U.S.S.Wasp 1812

Postby Anatol » Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:04 pm

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Escorted by the Cruizer class brig-sloop H.M.S. Frolic, a convoy of fourteen British merchant vessels departed the Gulf of Honduras on 12 September 1812, bound for England. Frolic was under the command of Thomas Whinyates.
On 16 October, about 300 miles north of Bermuda, the convoy was scattered by a strong gale. Frolic suffered damage to her rigging, the main yard being carried away. October 17 saw Frolic's crew making good her repairs, and as darkness fell she was re-joined by six of her merchant charges.
Meanwhile, the American sloop of war U.S.S.Wasp had departed the Delaware River on 13 October, running south-east to intercept ships sailing between Great Britain and the West Indies. Wasp had also suffered in the same gale by losing her jib boom. At 11:30 pm on 17 October, the crew of the U.S.S. Wasp alerted their Commander, Jacob Jones, to several vessels sailing downwind to the leeward. The wily Jones stayed his distance until dawn, when he identified them as merchantmen surrounding a Royal Navy brig.
By now the weather had improved, but there was still a strong wind blowing and a fretful sea. Both vessels shortened sail and prepared for action. The crew of Frolic took down the jury mainyard, lashing it tightly to the deck. Since both vessels carried a main armament of short-range carronades, there was no attempt at manoeuvering to gain advantage before the fight; instead, they closed to "within hail", opening fire at 11:30 am, with U.S.S. Wasp to starboard and H.M.S. Frolic positioned to port.
Wasp 's crew fired low into their opponent's hull, whilst Frolic 's gunners fired high into the enemy's rigging in an attempt to destabilise it. The furious action continued, the ships closed, and the American gunners struck Frolic's sides with their rammers.
After just twenty minutes, Wasp 's rigging suffered serious damage, with the main topmast, the mizzen topgallant mast and the gaff being shot away. Virtually every brace was severed, now rendering the ship unmanageable. Frolic suffered even more, with the crew sustaining heavy casualties. Both vessels were now effectively unmanageable. Suddenly, Frolic collided with Wasp, which now fired a final devastating broadside. The superiority of American gunnery was widely accepted by both sides, although the Americans applauded the courageous fight put up by the British.
At precisely 11:52 am, American sailors boarded H.M.S. Frolic to discover half the crew either dead or wounded and all British officers dead. By contrast, the Americans had suffered just ten casualties.
Just after the fighting ceased, both the Frolic 's masts collapsed. An American prize crew boarded her and attempted to repair her rigging. A few hours later H.M.S. Poictiers hove into view, a British ship of the line commanded by Captain Sir John Beresford. Frolic was still rendered unmanageable, but with its damaged rigging U.S.S. Wasp was soon overtaken and she was forced to surrender in the face of impossible odds. Captain Beresford was expected to join the fleet blockading the American coast, but he now deemed it vital to marshal Frolic 's convoy for safe conduct to Bermuda.
Master Commandant Jacob Jones and his crew were soon to be released in a prisoner exchange. He was subsequently promoted and appointed to the command of U.S.S . Macedonian, which had been captured from the Royal Navy on 25th October. Jones later served as second in command to Commodore Isaac Chauncey, commander of the naval forces on Lake Ontario. H.M.S. Frolic was sadly broken up in November 1813, her severe damage rendering her incapable of ever fighting again, whilst Wasp briefly served in the Royal Navy as H.M.S. Peacock, she in turn being wrecked in 1814.
The design stamp is made after mirror painting of Roy Cross:”British brig the “Floric”,battles the American Cruiser “Wasp” 18 October 1812”
Mali 2017;500f; ource:www.richardjoslin.com/print-view.php?The Naval Action Between U.S.S i Wasp i H.M.S. i Frolic i 18th October 1812 101.
Anatol
 
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