SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

ANDERS SPARRMANN and Tahitian canoes

On this stamp of Sweden is depict a portrait of the Swedish naturalist Anders Sparrmann who made a voyage with James Cook during his second voyage in 1772. The background shows a part of a painting made by William Hodges of Matavai Bay, Tahiti and the island from the north-west, with Mount Orofena in the distance, together with Point Venus and One-Tree Hill. The scene is diffused with the light from the rising sun on the left of the painting. Various Tahitian boats can be seen in the foreground; a small outrigger sailing canoe on the far left, the coastal craft in the centre with two figures on board, and the war canoe on the far right with its dominant stern. (the war canoe is not visible on the stamp.)
Read more at http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collection ... TGlOS4S.99

Wikipedia gives on Sparrmann:
Anders Sparrman (27 February 1748, Tensta, Uppland – 9 August 1820) was a Swedish naturalist, abolitionist and an apostle of Carl Linnaeus.
Sparrman was the son of a clergyman. At the age of nine he enrolled at Uppsala University, beginning medical studies at fourteen and becoming one of the outstanding pupils of Linnaeus. In 1765 he went on a voyage to China as ship's doctor, returning two years later and describing the animals and plants he had encountered. On this voyage he met Carl Gustaf Ekeberg.
He sailed for the Cape of Good Hope in January 1772 to take up a post as a tutor. When James Cook arrived there later in the year at the start of his second voyage, Sparrman was taken on as assistant naturalist to Johann and Georg Forster. After the voyage he returned to Cape Town in July 1775 and practiced medicine, earning enough to finance a journey into the interior. He was guided by Daniel Ferdinand Immelman, the young frontiersman who had previously guided the Swedish botanist Carl Peter Thunberg. Daniel and Sparrman reached the Great Fish River and returned in April 1776. In 1776 Sparrman returned to Sweden, where he had been awarded an honorary doctorate in his absence. He was also elected a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1777. He was appointed keeper of the natural historical collections of the Academy of Sciences in 1780, Professor of natural history and pharmacology in 1781 and assessor of the Collegium Medicum in 1790. In 1787 he took part in an expedition to West Africa, but this was not successful.
Sparrman published several works, the best known of which is his account of his travels in South Africa and with Cook, published in English as A voyage to the Cape of Good Hope, towards the Antarctic polar circle, and round the world: But chiefly into the country of the Hottentots and Caffres, from the year 1772 to 1776 (1789). He also published a Catalogue of the Museum Carlsonianum (1786–89), in which he described many of the specimens he had collected in South Africa and the South Pacific, some of which were new to science. He published an Ornithology of Sweden in 1806.
The asteroid 16646 Sparrman bears his name. The Swedish novelist Per Wästberg has written a biographical novel about Sparrman which was published in English in 2010, under the title as The Journey of Anders Sparrman. Anders Erikson Sparrman is denoted by the author abbreviation Sparrm. when citing a botanical name.

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anders_Sparrman
Sweden 1973 1k sg 746, scott 1006.

UTO LIGHTHOUSE

This stamp issued by Finland in 1946 for the 250th Anniversary of the Pilotage Authority shows us the old light tower of Uto built in 1753, on the stamp is also a sailing vessel which is not identified. The rigging looks like a schoonerbarque?

Uto is a small island in the archipelago of the Baltic Sea, Utö is the southernmost year-round inhabited island in Finland. Uto lighthouse was built upon this small island on the eastern side of the Uto inlet, which is the entrance of the channel that leads through and amongst the islands to Abo (Turku).

She was the oldest of the Finnish lighthouses and built in 1753 on Uto, also known as the main gateway to the Archipelago Sea. The Uto lighthouse was destroyed in the War of Finland 1808-1809, but was rebuilt in 1814. Subsequently, its tower has been remodelled several times.

The old tower was conical built, 30 meter high. The tower had two lights, an oil-light in the lantern on top of the tower and a coal fire outside the tower in an iron basket attached to the tower via a wooden type frame.

Source: Sailing directions for the Gulf of Finland, Navicula and internet
Finland 1946 8.00M sg 420, scott252.

KALEVALA POEM

For the 100th anniversary of the publication of the epic poem Kalevala, Finland issued three stamps in 1935 which shows on the 2,00 M stamp a type of Viking ship in which the hero of the epos Väinämöinen escaped with the “sampo”, made by the blacksmith Ilmarinen.
When the Goddess Louhi finds out that the “sampo” was stolen, she changed in an eagle, took her warriors on her back and landed on the boat of Väinämöinen (as seen on stamp), where after a battle started in which the boat sank, which took with her the “sampo”.
Plenty more on this poem you can find on the internet,

Encyclopaedia Britannica gives:
Kalevala, Finnish national epic compiled from old Finnish ballads, lyrical songs, and incantations that were a part of Finnish oral tradition.
The Kalevala was compiled by Elias Lönnrot, who published the folk material in two editions (32 cantos, 1835; enlarged into 50 cantos, 1849). Kalevala, the dwelling place of the poem’s chief characters, is a poetic name for Finland, meaning “land of heroes.” The leader of the “sons of Kaleva” is the old and wise Väinämöinen, a powerful seer with supernatural origins, who is a master of the kantele, the Finnish harplike stringed instrument. Other characters include the skilled smith Ilmarinen, one of those who forged the “lids of heaven” when the world was created; Lemminkäinen, the carefree adventurer-warrior and charmer of women; Louhi, the female ruler of Pohjola, a powerful land in the north; and the tragic hero Kullervo, who is forced by fate to be a slave from childhood.
Among the main dramas of the poem are the creation of the world and the adventurous journeys of Väinämöinen, Ilmarinen, and Lemminkäinen to Pohjola to woo the beautiful daughter of Louhi, during which the miraculous sampo, a mill that produces salt, meal, and gold and is a talisman of happiness and prosperity, is forged and recovered for the people of Kalevala. Although the Kalevala depicts the conditions and ideas of the pre-Christian period, the last canto seems to predict the decline of paganism: the maid Marjatta gives birth to a son who is baptized king of Karelia, and the pagan Väinämöinen makes way for him, departing from Finland without his kantele and songs.
The Kalevala is written in unrhymed octosyllabic trochees and dactyls (the Kalevala metre) and its style is characterized by alliteration, parallelism, and repetition. Besides fostering the Finnish national spirit, the poem has been translated into at least 20 languages; it has inspired many outstanding works of art, e.g., the paintings of Akseli Gallen-Kallela and the musical compositions of Jean Sibelius. The epic style and metre of the poem The Song of Hiawatha by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow also reflect the influence of the Kalevala.

Finland 1935 2.00M sg 307, scott 208. The painting shows the landing of Louhi on the boat, painting is made by Aksell Gallen Kallela.

Haukur 1973

Haukur was built in Reykjavík in 1973, thus being a youngster for a wooden boat. In the beginning she was designed as a fishing boat but due to the shipbuilder’s respect and enthusiasm for old sail boats the hull shape was rather unusual and in fact with a resemblance to the old shark and fishing schooners that were common around Iceland in the 19th century. When North Sailing bought the boat in 1996 it was soon clear that the boat would be a great sailing vessel and after serving 5 summers as an ordinary whale watching vessel the boat was transformed to a two mast schooner in the shipyard of Húsavík.

Phoenix 1929

The Phoenix is a ship built by Hjorne & Jakobsen at Frederikshavn, Denmark in 1929, originally as an Evangelical Mission Schooner.
Length: 112ft Beam21.9ft Draught 8.5ft. Propulsion 12 sails, 235 h.p. Volvo. Crew of 10

Missionary and cargo ship
Twenty years later she retired from missionary work and carried cargo until her engine room was damaged by fire. In 1974 she was bought by new owners who converted her into a Brigantine before being purchased by Square Sail in 1988. A first aid over-haul enabled her to sail back to the UK where she underwent a complete refit.
Appearances in films
Caravel Santa Maria
During 1991 she was converted to the 15th century Caravel Santa Maria for Ridley Scott's film 1492: Conquest of Paradise. The ship was known as Santa Maria until, in 1996, due to increasing demand for period square-riggers, she was converted into a 2 masted Brig and reverted to her original name Phoenix of Dell Quay.
Hornblower Series 3
Phoenix of Dell Quay was used as the ship Retribution in the Hornblower Series 3.

Wikipedia

Spirit of New Zealand 1986

The tall ship Spirit of New Zealand is a steel-hulled, three-masted barquentine from Auckland, New Zealand. It was purpose-built by the Spirit of Adventure Trust in 1986 for youth development. It is 42.5 m in total length and carries a maximum of 40 trainees and 13 crew on overnight voyages. The ship's home port is Auckland, and it spends most of its time sailing around the Hauraki Gulf. During the summer season, it often sails to the Marlborough Sounds and Nelson, at the top of the South Island.
The spirit of the project was derived from the sail training operations of the schooners "Sir Winston Churchill" and "Malcolm Miller" which were built for the organisation formerly known as the Sail Training Association ( STA) https://www.spiritofadventure.org.nz/th ... ur-history
The ship is used for a year-round programme of youth development, consisting primarily of 10-day individual voyages for 15- to 19-year-olds and 5-day Spirit Trophy voyages for teams of 10 Year 10 students. Once a year an Inspiration voyage for trainees with physical disabilities is run, as well as board of trustees and Navy training voyages. In addition, adult day, weekend and coastal voyages are offered to paying members of the public. The ship is usually in dry-dock for refit in November and does not sail on Christmas Day.
Design
The Spirit of New Zealand is a barquentine-rigged three-masted steel hull 33.3 m (109 ft) long, with an overall length of 45.2 m (148 ft) including the bowsprit, and a maximum width of 9.1 m (29.9 ft). She has a draft of about 4 m (13 ft) and a displacement of 286 tons. Under power, the Spirit of New Zealand can reach a top speed of 10 knots, and 14 knots under sail. A new engine installed in late 2010 is expected to increase the vessel's maximum speed.
The three steel masts are 28.7, 31.3, and 28.0 metres high and carry 14 sails totalling 724.3m² (7,965 ft²). There are 3 jibs and 4 square sails on the foremast. The main and mizzen masts are gaff rigged, and both can carry a gaff-topsail. In addition, there are 3 staysails on the main mast.
The hull is painted black with the ship's name and the Trust's website painted in white at the bow and across the stern. In addition, a large silver fern is painted on either side of the bow beneath the name. A stainless steel rubbing strake runs the length of the vessel and circular port holes are visible above the waterline. A wooden rail runs around the edge of the entire deck.
The standard crew of the Spirit of New Zealand has varied during her lifetime, but in 2010 consisted of 1 master, 3 mates, 1 cook, 1 engineer, 2 cadets, 3 volunteer watch assistants, 2 leading hands and 40 trainees. For day sail voyages, the ship is registered to carry significantly more passengers. The trainees are normally split 20 male and 20 female, and sleep in separate accommodation. A change to the male accommodation was made so that 6 of the bunks could be separated from the remainder, allowing voyages to sail with 26 females and 14 males. This change was made in response to frequently higher female applicants than male applicants.
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VESIKKO submarine

The full index of our ship stamp archive

VESIKKO submarine

Postby aukepalmhof » Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:13 pm

vesikko jpg.jpg
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2018 submarine Finland.jpg
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For the 100th year anniversary of the Finnish Defence Force in 2018, the Finnish Post issued a booklet on which two stamps have a maritime theme.
One stamp shows a submarine with in the background another Finnish warship, I found the photo after which the stamp was designed on the net, and which give that the submarine VESIKKO is depict and the vessel in the background is an armed coastal vessel of which the Finnish Navy had two vessels before World War II, the VÄINÄMÖINEN and IIMARINEN, which is shown is unknown. The photo shows more vessels but they are not depict on the stamp.

The coastal submarine was built under yard no 707 by the Crichton-Vulcan Dock in Turku, Finland.
09 October 1930 ordered.
07 March 1931 laid down.
10 May 1933 launched as CV 707.
Displacement 254 ton surfaced, 303 ton submerged, dim 40.90 x 4.07 x 8.18m (height), draught 3.79 surfaced.
Powered diesel electric by two MWM RS 127S 6-cyl. diesels each 350 hp and two Siemens Pgvv 322/36 electro motors each 132 kW. Speed surfaced 13 knots, submerged 8 knots.
Test depth 150 metre.
Armament 3 – 53.3 cm bow torpedo tubes, carried 5 torpedoes. 1 – 20mm Madsen MG AA. 1 12.7mm MG.
Crew 16.
30 April 1934 commissioned in the Finnish Navy.
19 January 1936 in service as the VESIKKO.

VESIKKO is a submarine (the single ship of her class), which was launched on 10 May 1933 at the Crichton-Vulcan dock in Turku. Until 1936 it was named by its manufacturing codename CV 707. VESIKKO was ordered by a Dutch engineering company Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (a German front company) in 1930 as a commercial submarine prototype. Purchased by the Finnish before the war, she saw service in the Winter War and World War II, sinking the Soviet merchant ship VYBORG as her only victory. After the cease-fire with the Allies in 1944, VESIKKO was retired. Finland was banned from operating submarines after the war and she was kept in storage until she was turned into a museum ship.
VESIKKO was one of five submarines to serve in the Finnish Navy. The other four were the three larger Vetehinen-class boats VETEHINEN, VESIHIIS, IKU_TURSO and the small SAUKKO . The word "VESIKKO" is the Finnish name for the European mink.

Development and design
Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (IvS), was a German front company in the Netherlands, established to secretly design a new German submarine fleet. According to the terms of the Versailles Peace Treaty after World War I, Germany was banned from building and operating submarines among other "offensive" weaponry. This resulted in moving the armaments' research to foreign countries. For example, German tanks and aircraft were tested and developed in the Soviet Union. Therefore, unlike the other submarines in the Finnish Navy, VESIKKO was not part of the Naval Act. Instead, it was part of the secret rebuilding of the German Navy, the Reichsmarine.
The objective of Germans was to design a modern submarine type to be used during general mobilization; technology and standards were to be new and not based on World War I designs. For this purpose two prototypes were built, E1 in Spain and CV 707 in Finland. The latter was later chosen as a first submarine type for the new fleet. Construction of both of these experimental submarines was funded by the Reichsmarine.
Commander Karl Bartenbach, who had retired from active service in the Reichsmarine, worked as secret liaison officer in Finland. His official title was Naval Expert of the Finnish Defence Forces, and it was under his leadership that the 496-ton Vetehinen class and the 100-ton SAUKKO were built in Finland. Both submarine types were designed by IvS. For the German Navy, his mission was to oversee the developing and construction of a 200–250 ton submarine, which would still equal the combat effectiveness of the Vetehinen class. The whole task was named The Lilliput Project.
The official decision allowing VESIKKO to be constructed in Finland was made in 1930 after several meetings with the Finnish Government. Since The Liliput Project broke the terms of the Versailles Peace Treaty, there was no mention of Germany in the agreement, and it was decided that the new submarine could only be sold to nations belonging to the League of Nations. The would-be buyers also had to have the rights to own such a weapon. The Finnish Government gained primary rights to purchase the submarine.

The construction of CV 707 begun in 1931 at the Crichton-Vulcan dock in Turku. At the time of its construction, CV 707 was one of the most advanced submarine designs. For example, the maximum depth was over twice that of earlier German submarines, and its hull could be built completely by electric welding. By eliminating rivets there was increased resistance to water pressure, decreased oil leakages, and the construction process was faster. Germans tested CV 707 in the Archipelago of Turku during 1933–34.
VESIKKO was a prototype for the German Type II submarines. Six Type IIA submarines (U-1 to U-6) which were almost identical to VESIKKO were built in the Deutsche Werke dock in Kiel, and after these, 44 Type IIB, IIC, and IID submarines were built before and during World War II.

Service history
According to the agreement between the Finnish Ministry of Defence and the Crichton-Vulcan company, Finland had the primary purchase option until 1937, and the Finnish Government took over the submarine during August 1934. After the Finnish Parliament had approved the acquisition in 1936, the submarine joined the Finnish Navy under the name of VESIKKO.

Winter War
VESIKKO was deployed with VESIHIISI to the Hanko region on 30 November 1939 as several Soviet surface combatants were headed towards the area. However the submarine failed to arrive in time to intercept the KIROV and its escorts. VESIKKO was able to get close enough to see the cruiser but was unable to reach firing position as it had to evade shellfire. When on 17 December and on two following days the Soviets sent the battleship OKTYABRSKAYA ROYOLYUTSIYA to bombard Finnish positions at Koivisto, the Finnish Navy decided to send out VESIKKO to hunt for it. However, by the time the submarine reached the area a day later the Soviet battleship MARAT which bombarded on that day had already departed and temperature had dropped to −15 °C (5 °F) which prevented the submarine from diving.

Continuation War
In summer 1941 all Finnish submarines were once again readied for combat operations and they sailed to the staging area in the Gulf of Finland. VESIKKO's base of operations was to be Vahterpää island near the town of Loviisa. When the Continuation War started on 25 June, all submarines were ordered to patrol the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland. On 3 July 1941 VESIKKO sank a Soviet merchant ship named VYBORG east of Gogland island. The attack was made 700 metres (770 yd) from the target; first one torpedo was launched at 13:25 which hit the stern of the target. The target stopped but did not appear to be sinking so VESIKKO fired another torpedo which failed to explode. Very soon after the strike, three Soviet patrol boats started to chase VESIKKO and tried to destroy it with depth charges and salvage the damaged ship but failed to accomplish either task. VYBORG sank on 3 July at 14:15.
Soviet historiography later downplayed the sinking of VYBORG, insisting that several submarines and German naval bombers had assaulted the ship simultaneously, and that over twenty torpedoes had been launched against it. During fall 1941 VESIKKO operated from Helsinki and made three patrols to the coast of Estonia. In 1942, equipped with depth charge rack, she acted as an escort to convoys in the Sea of Åland, and hunted suspected hostile submarines near Helsinki.
In the beginning of June 1944, VESIKKO escorted the convoys which were evacuating people from the Karelian Isthmus. Due to the armistice between Finland and the Soviet Union, VESIKKO was ordered to return to port on 19 September 1944. VESIKKO sailed the last time as a combat vessel of the Finnish Navy in December 1944.

During wartime, several officers were commanders of the submarine: Ltn. Kauko Pekkanen (1939), Capt. Ltn. Olavi Aittola (1940 and 1941), Capt. Ltn. Antti Leino (1942), Capt. Ltn. Pentti Airaksinen (1942), Capt. Ltn. Eero Pakkala (1943), Capt. Ltn. Olavi Syrjänen (1943), and Capt. Ltn. Lauri Parma (1944).

Museum ship
In January 1945, the Allies' Commission responsible for monitoring the observance of the Peace treaty ordered the Finnish submarines to be disarmed, and in 1947 according to the terms of the Paris Peace Treaty, the Finnish Defence Forces were forbidden to have any submarines. The Finnish submarines VETEHINEN, VESIHIISI, IKU-TURSO and SAUKKO, were sold to Belgium to be scrapped in 1953. VESIKKO was spared because the Finnish Defence Forces hoped that Finland could in future gain permission to use submarines again, and VESIKKO was then meant to be used for training purposes. VESIKKO was stored at the Valmet Oy dock in Katajanokka district in Helsinki.
In 1959, the Finnish Navy decided to sell VESIKKO because Finland had not managed to obtain the right to use submarines again, and because Valmet Oy complained that the old submarine hampered the work in the dock. Thanks to the Institute of Military History and the former submarine officers, the sale was cancelled and VESIKKO was conveyed to the Military Museum.
The Military Museum moved VESIKKO to Susisaari island in Suomenlinna, on the shores of Artillery Bay, and restored the submarine. The restoration process lasted over a decade and was very difficult; most of the equipment had been removed after the war and put to other use. In addition, VESIKKO had been subject to vandalism in the dock. However, with donations and voluntary work, the restoration was completed, and VESIKKO opened as a museum on the anniversary of the Finnish Navy 9 July 1973.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_submarine_VESIKKO
Finland 2018 SG?, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
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