SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

pedalo

Cuba issued four stamps in 1992 for tourism, the 20c shows us a “pedalo” of which
Wikipedia gives:
A pedalo (British English) or paddle boat (U.S., Canadian, and Australian English) is a small human-powered watercraft propelled by the action of pedals turning a paddle wheel.
The paddle wheel of a pedalo is a smaller version of that used by a paddle steamer. A two-seat pedalo has two sets of pedals, side by side, designed to be used together. Some models, however, have three pedals on each side to allow a person boating alone to pedal from a centrally seated position.
Pedalos, being particularly suited to calm waters, are often hired out for use on ponds and small lakes in urban parks.
The earliest record of a pedalo is perhaps Leonardo da Vinci's diagram of a craft driven by two pedals.

Also on the right of the stamp is a small sailyacht of which I have not any information.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedalo
Cuba 1992 20c sg 3739, scott 3433.

La REINE HORTENSE yacht

Iceland issued in 1986 four stamps for the “Bicentenary of the City of Reykjavik” of which the 12 Kr stamp shows us an 1856 view from the banks of the Tjörn (Pond) with in the background the bay of Reykjavik. By the stamp is given by the Icelandic Post:
In the background there is the French Imperial yacht La REINE HORTENCE. This illustration is copied after a picture in a book entitled’ Voyage dans le mers du Nord” by Charles Edmond, which was published in 1857 and described the French Prince Napoleon’s voyage around the Northern oceans in 1856.

August 1844 the 3-mast yacht was laid down for King Louis-Philippe under the name COMTE D’EU on the yard of Augustin Normand in Le Havre.
20 December 1846 launched.
Displacement 1,100 ton, dim. 62 x 10.80 x 5.7m.
Powered by a Creusot 4-cyl. steam engine, 320 nhp, speed 12 knots.
Armament 6 – 12cm guns.
Laid down as COMTE D’EU, the ship was renamed to PATRIOTE on 20 February 1848 after the French Revolution of 1848.

In June 1853, she became the imperial yacht REINE HORTENSE.
06 August 1853 in Dieppe.
July 1854 Sailed from Cherbourg for Bayonne, at the disposal of the Empress.
19 August 1854 arrived in Danzig.
In 1855, she served as a troopship to ferry forces bound for the theatre of the Crimean War.
08 February 1855 arrived in Kamiesch https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamiesch with ships in tow.

In June 1865 (wrong given by Wikipedia, must be 1856) she took Prince Napoléon on an expedition to Greenland, with the ARTÉMISE (1847), a 28-gun corvette, La PERDRIX and, the COCYTE and two British coal tender screw steamers, the TASMANIA and the SAXON of 700 tons each. On 30 June at Reykjavík in Iceland, she met again Lord Dufferin who was on his own travels that would feature in his book Letters From High Latitudes, published the next year. Dufferin's journey was taking in Iceland, Jan Mayen and Spitzbergen. He had chartered the schooner FOAM for the task. Dufferin was invited to join Prince Napoleon aboard his royal steamer, and the Prince hearing that the FOAM had broken down offered them a tow north to Jan Mayen as they were going to the same region. On their last night in Reykjavik the prince held a ball to which all the rank, fashion, and beauty of the tiny town (population 700 or 800) were invited.
The FOAM was attached with two cables and the flotilla set off on 7 July, the collier SAXON traveling all too slowly behind. The fragile La REINE HORTENSE was soon to be in increasing danger from the ice and the French were required to abandon their journey 100 miles short of Jan Mayen, and return to Reykjavík. So on 11 July they let loose the FOAM to carry on north by sail. This was fortunate in a sense since on their return they were to discover that the SAXON had been damaged by ice, and would have meant that the convoy would have been short of fuel. This effectively cancelled the expedition.

18-20 May 1857 sailed from Bordeaux to Rochefort with the Emperor Napoleon III and Grand Duke Konstantine Nikolayevich of Russia. Then via other French ports to the Isle of Wight and returned back in Calais on 31 May 1857, where after the Grand Duke leaves the vessel and traveled to Brussel.
07 July 1857 back in The Isle of Wight with Prince Napoleon and his suite, where after she sailed via Lerwick and Bergen to the North Cape.
REINE HORTENSE ferried Prince Napoléon Bonaparte from Marseille to Genoa in early 1859 for his marriage to Princess Maria Clotilde of Savoy, and Napoléon III from Marseille to Genoa on 11 and 12 May 1859.
28 June 1860 in the port of Toulon, 12 April 1862 sails from Toulon with the Duchess of Hamilton https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_ ... %80%931888)
In 1862 she was in the Baltic when she gave aid to a British vessel who she towed 80 miles from Bomarsund to Stockholm, on board had been Lord Dufferin, who she was to meet again 3 years later.
21 March1863 arrived in the harbour of Villefrance with the EAGLE.
06 October 1863 arrived on the road of La Rochelle with on board the Emperor.
01 January 1864 returned to the French Navy.
The REINE HORTENSE was recommissioned as the imperial yacht on 20 April 1865 for an official visit of the Emperor to Algeria.
01 October 1865 decommissioned as imperial yacht in Cherbourg.
On 14 February 1867, she was renamed to CASSARD, and commissioned for the Algiers station. She served there until 1881, when she was decommissioned in Toulon before becoming a littoral defence ship
Renamed to FAUNE in 1893, she was used as a hulk in Port-Vendre then munition depot in Toulon. She was eventually broken up in 1920.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_ship_Cassard_(1846) http://www.dossiersmarine.org/c-c5.htm
Iceland 1986 12 Kr sg 684, scott ?

Exploration of Albany

In 1991, Australia issued a stamp and a miniature sheet, commemorating exploration of Albany, Western Australia by George Vancouver (1791) and Edward Eyre (1841). The coastline of the Albany area was observed for the first time in 1627 by the Dutchman François Thijssen, captain of the ship “ Gulden Zeepaert” (The Golden Seahorse), who sailed to the east as far as Ceduna in South Australia and back. Captain Thijssen had discovered the south coast of Australia and charted about 1,768 kilometres (1,099 mi) of it between Cape Leeuwin and the Nuyts Archipelago. GEORGE VANCOUVER: Departing England with two ships, HMS” Discovery” and HMS “Chatham”, on 1 April 1791, Vancouver commanded an expedition charged with exploring the Pacific region. In its first year the expedition travelled to Cape Town, Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, and Hawaii, collecting botanical samples and surveying coastlines along the way. On 29 September 1791, explorer Captain George Vancouver while exploring the south coast, entered and named “King George the Third's Sound” and” Princess Royal Harbour”, and took possession of New Holland for the British Crown. Vancouver went out of his way to establish good relationships with the local Aboriginal people.On the stamp In the background is the “Discovery”. JOHN EYRE: In 1841, Albany was the final destination of the explorer Edward John Eyre, the first European to reach Western Australia by land from the eastern colonies. Eyre, together with his Aboriginal companion Wylie , was the first European to traverse the coastline of the Great Australian Bight and the Nullarbor Plain by land in 1840–1841, on an almost 2000 mile trip to Albany, Western Australia . He had originally led the expedition with John Baxterand three aborigines. On 29 April 1841, two of the aborigines killed Baxter and left with most of the supplies. Eyre and Wylie were only able to survive because they chanced to encounter, at a bay near Esperance, Western Australia , a French whaling ship Mississippi , under the command of an Englishman, Captain Thomas Rossiter, for whom Eyre named the location Rossiter Bay .
Аustralia 1991;1.05;SG1303. Source: https://www.rosebedsstampshop.com/austr ... s-mnh.html. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_o ... _Australia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Vancouver. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_John_Eyre

STERN TRAWLER (stylized)

Iceland issued two stamps for the “Export, Trading and Commerce” of which the 35Kr shows us a stylized stern trawler viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11826

By the stamps is given by the Icelandic Post:
The Post and Telecommunications Administration will be issuing two new stamps which depict a few tokens of the branches of industry involved in exporting products from Iceland.

Icelanders are heavily dependent upon foreign trade. The geographical position of lceland and natural conditions lead to our having to transact extensive trade with other countries. Vigorous export activities are the basis for Iceland being an affluent society in the Westem manner. lt will hardly be disputed that the export value is the basis for the standard of living in Iceland being among the best in the world. High prices of sea products on the world market and strong marketing advances by Icelandic concerns have contributed to the fact that the Icelandic people have succeeded in building up a modern society.

Iceland Chamber of Commerce was established in 1917 with 170 founders from all around the country. Now the members are around 390 and consist of representatives of various spheres of the Icelandic economy, Ieading in the various progressive matters of Icelandic firms. The Export Council of lceland was established in 1986 in order to support Icelandic concerns in foreign marketing activities- The Council represents a field of work for most Icelandic Companies which in some way have to do with currency creative assignments. The Export Council s revenues are a part of the expenditure tax base of concerns in the processing of fish, industry, construction work, fisheries and carriage by sea and land. The Board of Directors of the Export Council consist of nine representatives of various spheres of the Icelandic economy as well as representatives of the public sector. In 1991 the total foreign currency receipts of the Icelandic people came to about ISK 130 billion. Sea products weigh most heavily. In 1991 these returned earnings amounting to over ISK 73 billion. Industry ranks next with a yield of about ISK 16 billion. income on account of communications came to almost ISK 13 billion and the tourist industry yielded over ISK 7 billion- Income from agriculture, including fish farming produce, has decreased considerably and agricultural export amounts to ISK 1.5 billion only. The countries of the European Community are Iceland s most important customers Britain is at the top of the list and Germany, France and Denmark are also prominent. Altogether almost 70% of Iceland’s total export go to EU countries. The United States of America and Japan are also important markets for Icelandic produce and about 12% of exports go to the former, but 7% to the latter.
The role of the Export Council is that of granting to export concerns information and marketing advice which aim at increasing the export value of goods and services from Iceland. Also to increase knowledge of the market and competitiveness of Icelandic concerns, thereby building a foundation for better livelihood in the country as well as creating a positive general image of the country, its people and products.
On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Icelandic Freezing Plants Corporation (SH) the other of the new stamps will depict its trade mark amongst few tokens. The establishment meeting of the Corporation was held on February 25th 1942. The purpose of the Corporation’s foundation was that of selling fish products in foreign markets, undertaking the purchase of operational goods, searching for new markets and experimenting with new products and methods of production.
Twenty three quick freezing plants around the-country are the founders of the Icelandic Freezing Plants Corporation, but now the producers are around 70. The corporation has throughout its activities been in the lead of Icelandic export concerns. In 1947 |he Corporation (SH) founded the concern of Coldwater Seafood Corporation in order to handle the sales of fish products in the United States market. ln 1956 a marketing office of the Icelandic Freezing Plants Corporation was opened
In England and in 1983 a subsidiary company ' Icelandic Freezing Plants, Limited was established
In England. Sales offices of the Icelandic Freezing Plants Corporation are also operated in Germany,
France and Japan, but dealings with the European Continent and Asia have increased rapidly during recent years.

The trade mark ICELANDIC originated in the United States, but it has become an image of quality products in the minds of fish buyers around the world. Behind this trade mark is a long story of development in a tough market where constant watchfulness in the field of quality and sales affairs has to be demonstrated.

Source: Icelandic Post.
Iceland 1992 30/35kr. sg788/789 scott 752/753

Aleksei Chirikov

Aleksei Ilyich Chirikov (Russian: Алексе́й Ильи́ч Чи́риков) (1703 – November 1748) was a Russian navigator and captain who along with Bering was the first Russian to reach North-West coast of North America. He discovered and charted some of the Aleutian Islands while he was deputy to Vitus Bering during the Great Northern Expedition. In 1721, Chirikov graduated from the Naval Academy. In 1725–1730 and 1733–1743, he was Vitus Bering's deputy during the First and the Second Kamchatka expeditions. In May 1741 Chirikov in the St Paul and Vitus Bering in the St Peter left Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskyand headed east. Some time after 20 June they were separated by a storm and never saw each other again. On 15 July 1741 Chirikov saw land at Baker Island off Prince of Wales Island at the south end of the Alaska Panhandle. This is about 450 miles southeast of Bering's landfall near Mount St. Elias at the north end of the panhandle. Unable to find a harbor he sailed north along Baranov Island past the later Russian base at Sitka. He sent out a longboat to find an anchorage. When it did not return after a week he sent out his second longboat which also failed to return. Now without any small boats Chirikov had no way of searching for the two longboats or landing on the coast to explore or replenish his supply of fresh water. After waiting as long as possible, he abandoned the longboats to their fate and on 27 July sailed west. He sighted the Kenai Peninsula, Kodiak Island and Adak Island near the western end of the Aleutians. With water critically low he reached Petropavlovsk on 12 October 1741. In 1742, Chirikov was in charge of a search party for Bering's ship St. Peter. During this trip, he located Attu Island. Chirikov took part in creating the final map of the Russian discoveries in the Pacific Ocean (1746). Chirikov's name is given to Capes of the Kyūshū Island, Attu Island, Anadyr Bay, Tauyskaya Bay, an underwater mountain in the Pacific Ocean, Chirikof Island and Cape Chirikof at the westernmost point of Baker Island.
Rossija 1999;Postal envelope. Rossija1991; 30к,30к;SG 6274,6275. Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksei_Chirikov

CORPUS CHRISTI PROCESSION ON LAKE HALLSTATT

The traditional Corpus Christi procession has been taking place on Lake Hallstatt for at least 389 years. This popular national holiday, steeped in local, historic tradition, will be celebrated by the lake.
Corpus Christi is a time when the people of Hallstatt decorate their traditional boats with flowers and foliage, and the village is prepared for a special celebration. The festivities date back to the Jesuits who formed colorful processions through the village. Due to the fact that there was limited open space in the old salt-mining village, the walking procession was replaced by boats and salt-carrying small ships on the lake. This afforded the local people some lovely views towards the "salt mountain" which had been their source of income for thousands of years.

The main procession, escorted by a choir and orchestra, assembles for worship at 9.00am in the parish and pilgrimage church "Our Lady of the Mountain" in Hallstatt. The lead celebrant is Otto Krepper, military deacon from Voralberg.

At around 10.00, the procession starts out towards the market square where the first "station" is made. The procession then continues down to the lake and along the lake shore from where the thousands of assembled Christians and visitors to Hallstatt will have stunning views of the bright and colorful collection of boats, and of the Holiest Sacrament. A second "station" is made by the War Memorial, and a third "station" of thanks-giving for young people will then be made by the bus terminal and the HTBLA.

The procession now continues on to the lake from where the "Plassen" - the mountain which guards over the people of Hallstatt - and also the "Salt Mountain" come into view. During the fourth "station" of thanks-giving, God is thanked for the "Mountain of Fortune" and the fruits of the earth.

Afterwards, the procession returns to dry land, and the procession continues back to the market square, accompanied by a local brass band. Here the final "blessing" is made and a The Deum is sung. The first ever procession was formed in 1623, and since 1628 has been a gift from the salt mines of Hallstatt.

Very significant members of the Hallstatt Corpus Christi Procession are the "Hallstatt Corpus Christi Gun Firers" who announce the most important parts of the proceedings by firing "Prangerstutzen" traditional guns. 3 shots are fired by the church and then by each "station" along the way, informing us of the significance of the events which follow. The day has a very early start for these men. They begin firing their guns at 6.00 am at the far end of Hallstatt. They move out on to the lake in boats, and every fifteen minutes continue their journey across the lake towards the church. At 9.00 they arrive on foot at the church and join the main procession.

https://dachstein.salzkammergut.at/en/h ... ssion.html
Austria 1993 5s sg2349, scott 1619.
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VESIKKO submarine

The full index of our ship stamp archive

VESIKKO submarine

Postby aukepalmhof » Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:13 pm

vesikko jpg.jpg
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2018 submarine Finland.jpg
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For the 100th year anniversary of the Finnish Defence Force in 2018, the Finnish Post issued a booklet on which two stamps have a maritime theme.
One stamp shows a submarine with in the background another Finnish warship, I found the photo after which the stamp was designed on the net, and which give that the submarine VESIKKO is depict and the vessel in the background is an armed coastal vessel of which the Finnish Navy had two vessels before World War II, the VÄINÄMÖINEN and IIMARINEN, which is shown is unknown. The photo shows more vessels but they are not depict on the stamp.

The coastal submarine was built under yard no 707 by the Crichton-Vulcan Dock in Turku, Finland.
09 October 1930 ordered.
07 March 1931 laid down.
10 May 1933 launched as CV 707.
Displacement 254 ton surfaced, 303 ton submerged, dim 40.90 x 4.07 x 8.18m (height), draught 3.79 surfaced.
Powered diesel electric by two MWM RS 127S 6-cyl. diesels each 350 hp and two Siemens Pgvv 322/36 electro motors each 132 kW. Speed surfaced 13 knots, submerged 8 knots.
Test depth 150 metre.
Armament 3 – 53.3 cm bow torpedo tubes, carried 5 torpedoes. 1 – 20mm Madsen MG AA. 1 12.7mm MG.
Crew 16.
30 April 1934 commissioned in the Finnish Navy.
19 January 1936 in service as the VESIKKO.

VESIKKO is a submarine (the single ship of her class), which was launched on 10 May 1933 at the Crichton-Vulcan dock in Turku. Until 1936 it was named by its manufacturing codename CV 707. VESIKKO was ordered by a Dutch engineering company Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (a German front company) in 1930 as a commercial submarine prototype. Purchased by the Finnish before the war, she saw service in the Winter War and World War II, sinking the Soviet merchant ship VYBORG as her only victory. After the cease-fire with the Allies in 1944, VESIKKO was retired. Finland was banned from operating submarines after the war and she was kept in storage until she was turned into a museum ship.
VESIKKO was one of five submarines to serve in the Finnish Navy. The other four were the three larger Vetehinen-class boats VETEHINEN, VESIHIIS, IKU_TURSO and the small SAUKKO . The word "VESIKKO" is the Finnish name for the European mink.

Development and design
Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (IvS), was a German front company in the Netherlands, established to secretly design a new German submarine fleet. According to the terms of the Versailles Peace Treaty after World War I, Germany was banned from building and operating submarines among other "offensive" weaponry. This resulted in moving the armaments' research to foreign countries. For example, German tanks and aircraft were tested and developed in the Soviet Union. Therefore, unlike the other submarines in the Finnish Navy, VESIKKO was not part of the Naval Act. Instead, it was part of the secret rebuilding of the German Navy, the Reichsmarine.
The objective of Germans was to design a modern submarine type to be used during general mobilization; technology and standards were to be new and not based on World War I designs. For this purpose two prototypes were built, E1 in Spain and CV 707 in Finland. The latter was later chosen as a first submarine type for the new fleet. Construction of both of these experimental submarines was funded by the Reichsmarine.
Commander Karl Bartenbach, who had retired from active service in the Reichsmarine, worked as secret liaison officer in Finland. His official title was Naval Expert of the Finnish Defence Forces, and it was under his leadership that the 496-ton Vetehinen class and the 100-ton SAUKKO were built in Finland. Both submarine types were designed by IvS. For the German Navy, his mission was to oversee the developing and construction of a 200–250 ton submarine, which would still equal the combat effectiveness of the Vetehinen class. The whole task was named The Lilliput Project.
The official decision allowing VESIKKO to be constructed in Finland was made in 1930 after several meetings with the Finnish Government. Since The Liliput Project broke the terms of the Versailles Peace Treaty, there was no mention of Germany in the agreement, and it was decided that the new submarine could only be sold to nations belonging to the League of Nations. The would-be buyers also had to have the rights to own such a weapon. The Finnish Government gained primary rights to purchase the submarine.

The construction of CV 707 begun in 1931 at the Crichton-Vulcan dock in Turku. At the time of its construction, CV 707 was one of the most advanced submarine designs. For example, the maximum depth was over twice that of earlier German submarines, and its hull could be built completely by electric welding. By eliminating rivets there was increased resistance to water pressure, decreased oil leakages, and the construction process was faster. Germans tested CV 707 in the Archipelago of Turku during 1933–34.
VESIKKO was a prototype for the German Type II submarines. Six Type IIA submarines (U-1 to U-6) which were almost identical to VESIKKO were built in the Deutsche Werke dock in Kiel, and after these, 44 Type IIB, IIC, and IID submarines were built before and during World War II.

Service history
According to the agreement between the Finnish Ministry of Defence and the Crichton-Vulcan company, Finland had the primary purchase option until 1937, and the Finnish Government took over the submarine during August 1934. After the Finnish Parliament had approved the acquisition in 1936, the submarine joined the Finnish Navy under the name of VESIKKO.

Winter War
VESIKKO was deployed with VESIHIISI to the Hanko region on 30 November 1939 as several Soviet surface combatants were headed towards the area. However the submarine failed to arrive in time to intercept the KIROV and its escorts. VESIKKO was able to get close enough to see the cruiser but was unable to reach firing position as it had to evade shellfire. When on 17 December and on two following days the Soviets sent the battleship OKTYABRSKAYA ROYOLYUTSIYA to bombard Finnish positions at Koivisto, the Finnish Navy decided to send out VESIKKO to hunt for it. However, by the time the submarine reached the area a day later the Soviet battleship MARAT which bombarded on that day had already departed and temperature had dropped to −15 °C (5 °F) which prevented the submarine from diving.

Continuation War
In summer 1941 all Finnish submarines were once again readied for combat operations and they sailed to the staging area in the Gulf of Finland. VESIKKO's base of operations was to be Vahterpää island near the town of Loviisa. When the Continuation War started on 25 June, all submarines were ordered to patrol the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland. On 3 July 1941 VESIKKO sank a Soviet merchant ship named VYBORG east of Gogland island. The attack was made 700 metres (770 yd) from the target; first one torpedo was launched at 13:25 which hit the stern of the target. The target stopped but did not appear to be sinking so VESIKKO fired another torpedo which failed to explode. Very soon after the strike, three Soviet patrol boats started to chase VESIKKO and tried to destroy it with depth charges and salvage the damaged ship but failed to accomplish either task. VYBORG sank on 3 July at 14:15.
Soviet historiography later downplayed the sinking of VYBORG, insisting that several submarines and German naval bombers had assaulted the ship simultaneously, and that over twenty torpedoes had been launched against it. During fall 1941 VESIKKO operated from Helsinki and made three patrols to the coast of Estonia. In 1942, equipped with depth charge rack, she acted as an escort to convoys in the Sea of Åland, and hunted suspected hostile submarines near Helsinki.
In the beginning of June 1944, VESIKKO escorted the convoys which were evacuating people from the Karelian Isthmus. Due to the armistice between Finland and the Soviet Union, VESIKKO was ordered to return to port on 19 September 1944. VESIKKO sailed the last time as a combat vessel of the Finnish Navy in December 1944.

During wartime, several officers were commanders of the submarine: Ltn. Kauko Pekkanen (1939), Capt. Ltn. Olavi Aittola (1940 and 1941), Capt. Ltn. Antti Leino (1942), Capt. Ltn. Pentti Airaksinen (1942), Capt. Ltn. Eero Pakkala (1943), Capt. Ltn. Olavi Syrjänen (1943), and Capt. Ltn. Lauri Parma (1944).

Museum ship
In January 1945, the Allies' Commission responsible for monitoring the observance of the Peace treaty ordered the Finnish submarines to be disarmed, and in 1947 according to the terms of the Paris Peace Treaty, the Finnish Defence Forces were forbidden to have any submarines. The Finnish submarines VETEHINEN, VESIHIISI, IKU-TURSO and SAUKKO, were sold to Belgium to be scrapped in 1953. VESIKKO was spared because the Finnish Defence Forces hoped that Finland could in future gain permission to use submarines again, and VESIKKO was then meant to be used for training purposes. VESIKKO was stored at the Valmet Oy dock in Katajanokka district in Helsinki.
In 1959, the Finnish Navy decided to sell VESIKKO because Finland had not managed to obtain the right to use submarines again, and because Valmet Oy complained that the old submarine hampered the work in the dock. Thanks to the Institute of Military History and the former submarine officers, the sale was cancelled and VESIKKO was conveyed to the Military Museum.
The Military Museum moved VESIKKO to Susisaari island in Suomenlinna, on the shores of Artillery Bay, and restored the submarine. The restoration process lasted over a decade and was very difficult; most of the equipment had been removed after the war and put to other use. In addition, VESIKKO had been subject to vandalism in the dock. However, with donations and voluntary work, the restoration was completed, and VESIKKO opened as a museum on the anniversary of the Finnish Navy 9 July 1973.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_submarine_VESIKKO
Finland 2018 SG?, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
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Re: VESIHIISI submarine not VESIKKO

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Jul 31, 2018 8:31 pm

Vesihiisi.jpg
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I got from Mr. Vadim Lapin that not the Finish submarine VESIKKO is depict on the stamp but the VESIHUUSI. He wrote the submarine has two black stripes on her command tower while the VESIKKO has not. He is correct. The photo which shows the VESIHUUSI is the same photo after which the stamp is designed, only the other Finish warships are blacked out.
The VESIHUUSI was built under yard No 703 by the Crichton-Vulcan yard in Turku, Finland for the Finnish Navy.
04 March 1927 ordered.
1927 Laid down.
01 August 1930 launched as the VESIHUUSI.
Displacement 493 ton surfaced, 716 ton submerged. Dim. 63.5 x 6.2 x 3.6m. (draught surface).
Powered, diesel electric by 2 Atlas diesel each 580 hp, and 2 Brown Boveri electro motors each 300 hp. Speed surface 12.6 knots, submerged 8.5 knots.
Range 1,812 mile by a speed of 10 knots surface, 75 mile by a speed of 4 knots submerged’
Armament 4 – 533mm torpedo tubes, 1 – 76mm Bofors, 1 – 20mm Madsen, 1 – 12.7mm, could carry 20 sea-mines. In 1942 fitted also with a depth charge rack with 4 depth charges.
Crew 30.
06 September 1930 completed.
02 December 1931 commissioned.

VESIHUUSI was a Finnish 500-tonne Vetehinen-class submarine that was constructed in the early 1930s. The vessel served in the Finnish Navy during the Second World War.

German design IIKU-TURSO, VESIHUUSI, VETEHINEN
While preparing the design of the Finnish submarine SAUKKO , the Germans also prepared a design for a seagoing submarine for the Finnish Navy. Three submarines were built to this design, and like SAUKKO, they were fitted for mine-laying, the mines being supplied by the Germans. Being designed for use against Soviet bases (never very far from the Finnish bases), radius of action was not of prime importance to this design, and only 20 tons of fuel oil were carried (as opposed to the 67 tons carried by the German Type VIIa based on this design.
Combat operations
Winter War
VESIHUUSI was ordered with VESIKKO to Hanko region on 30 November 1939 as several Soviet surface combatants were headed towards the area. The submarines however failed to arrive to the area in time to intercept the Soviet cruiser KIROV and its escorts.
VESIHUUSI ran aground in early December 1941 and had to be docked for a few days for repairs. On 27 December VESIHUUSI laid 16 mines off the Soviet naval station of Paldiski but soon after the ice forced the submarine to stay in port.
Continuation War
VESIHUUSI started the Continuation War on 22 June by laying 20 mines in Estonian waters (controlled at the time by the Soviet Union). She laid 18 more mines on 24 June at Ruuskeri south southwest from Gogland and further 18 mines on 26 June southeast from Bolshoy Tyuters. After this the mining operation was postponed and VESIHUUSI laid the 18 already loaded mines finally on 2 August east of Osmussaar.
On 2 July 1941 VESIHUUSI while patrolling east of Gogland encountered an escorted freighter heading east. A torpedo attack failed and the submarine suffered light damage from the escort's depth charges. On 5 August 1941 VESIHUUSI attacked a convoy transporting supplies to besieged Soviet garrison at Hanko. The convoy consisted of a transport vessel of Molotov class (Iosif Stalin-class passenger ship) escorted by pair of large minesweepers and group of patrol boats. The submarine penetrated the escort screen and launched two torpedoes at a range of 700 metres (770 yd) while being between the target and the escorts. Neither of the torpedoes exploded and the escorts forced VESIHUUSI to dive to the depth of 75 metres (246 ft). Though the submarine did not suffer severe damage from the depth charges the repairs in the dock lasted for a week.
In December 1941 after the Soviets had evacuated Hanko the Finnish submarines were docked for the winter. During the sailing season of 1941 the Italian torpedoes VESIHUUSI used (Finnish designation T/40) proved to be unreliable. During 1942 VESIHUUSI was upgraded with new 12-hydrophone listening arrays and equipped with depth charge rack capable of carrying 4 depth charges. The submarine was further modified by streamlining the tower and moving the 20 mm gun up to the tower.
On 9 August 1942, VESIHUUSI was deployed along with her two sister ships to Mariehamn. Their mission was to conduct anti-submarine and escort operations in the Sea of Åland. In the evening of 21 October 1942 she torpedoed and sank the Soviet S-class submarine S-7, near Lågskär in the Sea of Åland. The captain (Sergei Lisin) and four of the crew of S-7 were then captured.
On 4 July 1944 VESIHUUSI laid 20 mines between Moshchny Island (Lavansaari) and Seskar (Seiskari). The boat was attacked with depth charges by two Soviet minesweepers but was able to escape without any damage. The submarine laid further 18 mines north of Moshchny Island on 6 July 1944.
1966 Decommissioned.
12 February 1952 sold and broken up in Belgium.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_s ... _VESIHUUSI https://www.miramarshipindex.nz
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