SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.

The editor of Log book will retire this coming August and, unless a new one comes forward, the society will close.
With this in mind, we are not taking in any new members.
This is an unfortunate situation but seemingly unavoidable.
$post_attachment_names[$j]

LENITA

The full index of our ship stamp archive

LENITA

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Dec 18, 2018 7:25 pm

Lenita_bark_S-P-Clausen_KN13321.jpg
Click image to view full size
1983 lenita.jpg
Click image to view full size
Stanley Gibbons gives that the LENITA is depict on this 1983p stamp of the Falkland Islands, I found in Falkland Shipping Registry that the LENITA made a call at Port Stanley on 06 May 1898 under command of Capt. Clausen, arriving with a cargo of coal from Newcastle on Tyne, U.K. and she left on 25 June 1898. At that time she was sailing under the Danish flag.
Then she arrived on 08 March 1911 from London, and sailed again on 21 March 1911 bound for San Carlos, Port Stephens etc.
The last time she is given that she arrived 02 May 1911 from Port Stephens, Port Howard, etc., sailed on 07 May 1911 for Venezuela.

Mr. Tom Lloyd gives in Log Book October 1983 page 300/02 in an article how he identified the vessel depict on the stamp:

One of the most entertaining and satisfying aspects of our hobby is the time spent searching out the background information about the ships depicted on stamps.
Sometimes this involves writing many letters to people we don’t even know, or reading through volumes of books and magazines. Sometimes one almost gives up just before the answer turns up from an unexpected source. Take for example the 10p value of the Falkland’s 150th Anniversary set that was issued on January 3rd 1983, depicting a pair of ships under the title “Ship repairing trade 1850-1890”.
During this period shipping around the Cape (Horn) was increasing so that Port Stanley grew in importance for both ship repairing and re-victualling. The peak of this trade was reached in 1867, but, due to new and more stringent Board of Trade regulations, plus the advent of steam power meant that the trade began to decline, though Port Stanley remained and important port for the Royal Navy during both World Wars.
It has taken me ten months to “dig-out” the details of just one of the ships, the nearest), shown on this stamp which was designed by Ian Strange and Duffy Sheridan for lithographic printing by the House of Quests. This search involved writing to the Falkland Islands and the designers of the issue; but in the end it was a request in the “Upland Goose” which brought a reply from Mr. L. Griffiths, who like myself, is a member of the Falkland Islands Study Group.
He wrote to say that the ship in the foreground is a 392 ton Swedish barque (must be Danish barque) named the LENITA, which arrived at Stanley from London on March 3rd1910 under command of Captain Malquest and with a crew of ten.
She remained at the island for over a year, departing on May 3rd 1911 bound for the Columbian port of Rio Hache.
Both Mr. Griffiths and I find it puzzling why the LENITA was so long in the Falklands, unless she was involved in the carrying of inter-island cargoes, or even perhaps in seal or whale oil trading, for there are barrels pictures on the stamp, lined up on the jetty.
Mr. Griffiths informs me that he now owns a copy of the actual photograph upon which the design of the stamp was based; and reports that the ship, its sails, the jetty and the barrels have been faithfully reproduced.
However he adds on the original photograph there are four ships other ships; one to the west of the LENITA and three to the right. One is the hulk of the famous S.S. GREAT BRITAIN, two are steamers and the fourth is an unknown sailing ship, which judging from its condition could have been another floating hulk.
None of those other four vessels however are remotely like the background ship depicted on the stamp, which is more like a 19th century ship than one of the early 20th like the LENITA. (Which of course would fit in with the dates, 1850-90.)
It seems most odd that the LENITA was used to illustrate the late 19th century “Repairing Trade”, for she was photographed at Stanley, sometimes between 1909 and 1911 and was more likely involved in activities other than being repaired. The fact that she is pictured at the Government Public Jetty makes it unlikely that she was repaired, for such vessels were usually at anchor, or at one of the Falkland Island Company jetties. Thus it seems that the stamp artists have taken “philatelic Licence”, in order to make a picturesque design.
Research in the actual photograph used as the basis of the issue, turned out to be rather interesting, for it was one of a collection of old glass plates found by a Mr. Joseph Ring in his garage in 1977.
Mr Griffiths spent a deal of time with Mr. Peter Gilding enlarging the pictures on this plates and taking prints from them. Indeed the name of the LENITA was obtained by reading it on the ship as seen on one of Peter Gilding’s clever magnifications. Information about her was then researched from the Falkland Islands Government Shipping Records, with valuable additional information coming from some older residents of Stanley.
The approximate age of the photographic plates came from those showing a badly battered sailing ship in Stanley Harbour with masts severely damaged. From one of her lifeboats, Mr Griffiths and friends identified this ship as the WAVERTREE, and English vessel that arrived at the Falklands on December 7th 1910; and the background to this photograph that plus others in the collection, including that of the LENITA all fitted together as if the photographer had taken a set of pictures, “panning” round the view of the port. This discovered proving its rather “incorrect” use for the design of a stamp supposedly showing the repair industry of 1850 to 1890.
I must in all fairness end by expressing a debt of gratitude to Mr. Griffiths who has so interestingly “dugout” information about yet another ship-stamp from the British Territories in the Far South.

The Falkland Island Ship Registry gives for the LENITA also her Capt. name as Clausen I searched the net and I found the following, My Danish is not good at all so there could be mistakes be made in the translation.

Built at the Vindskärs Varv by J. A. Strandberg and Sjölén, Sundsvall, Sweden for A/S Barkskipet Lenita’s rederi (P.H. Clausen) at Norby, Fanø, Denmark.
09 June 1894 launched as the LENITA.
Tonnage 451 brt, 401 net, dim. 143.6 x 30.3 x 15.1ft.Bark rigged.
Wooden hull, copper sheathed.
The yard lost 23.000 Kr on this deal.

Sailed for her maiden voyage under command of Capt. S.P. Clausen after she had loaded a full load of timber in Sundsvall in July for Delagoa Bay arrived 10 November in Delagoa Bay, thereafter she proceeded to Beira, Fort Harnelin, Delagoa Bay to Miko in the Bismarck Archipelago, Samoa and Tonga from where she left with a cargo of copra to Valparaiso, Chile.
From Valparaiso she returned to Mioko Island and Sainoa where she loaded for Liverpool, where she arrived on 21 December 1896, after being away from Europe for 2¼ year.
1902 She loaded coffee in Batavia and Padang, Indonesia for New York where she arrived on 13 February 1903.
13 February 1903 her last long voyage was from Gothenburg with timber for Punta Arenas, Chile. Then in ballast to Montevideo where after she loaded in Conception for Hull. Her next voyage was to Sundsvall for a cargo of timber back to Hull.
From there she sailed to Coatzacoalcos, Mexico, then she sailed to La Vela de Corvo, Azores to load divi-divi for Hamburg where she arrived on 08 August 1905.
29 December 1906 the LENITA was sold to Robert Petersson in Bergkvara, Sweden for 20,000 Kr.
Used in Baltic and North Sea trades thereafter.
1910 After discharging props in Hartlepool, she loaded there a cargo of coal for Port Stanley, then she made some voyages in South America and the Caribbean
After 1914 re-rigged in a barkentine (other sources give schooner) and again used in the North Sea and Baltic trades.
1916 Sold in Gothenburg for 75,000 Kr. to Karl Lundgren, Bergkvara. A year later sold to Algot Södergren in Blidö for 115,000 Kr.
1922 Sold to N.O. Lagerstedt, Stockholm.
1927 Sold to J.E. Jansson in Mariehamn for 20,000 Kr.
03 June 1930 the LENITA underway from Skellefteå to Aalborg with a cargo of timber came in collision with the Johnson liner KRONPRINSESSAN MARGARETHA, The LENITA flooded but she stayed afloat due to her cargo of timber. She was towed to Aalborg were she was condemned.
07 June 1930 sold at a public auction to Meier Antonsen in Aalborg, the rigging was later used on a 4 mast schooner in Estonia and the cabin was used for a holiday home outside Aalborg

Source: http://www.lohfert.dk/Fano/Lenita.htm https://mfs.dk/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/l-aa.pdf
Falkland Islands 1983 10p sg442, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 5814
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 101 guests

cron