SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.

The editor of Log book will retire this coming August and, unless a new one comes forward, the society will close.
With this in mind, we are not taking in any new members.
This is an unfortunate situation but seemingly unavoidable.
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UNITED NATIONS TRANSPORTATION 1997

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UNITED NATIONS TRANSPORTATION 1997

Postby aukepalmhof » Wed Jan 30, 2019 2:14 am

Image (23).jpg
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United Nations, New York issued in 1997 a set of stamps for “transportation” this two stamp shows us.

The sailing vessels is a clipper, square rigged with skysails and on the mizzen mast a spanker sail.
See: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=13935

The other stamp shows us a side paddle steamer, square rigged on the foremast and the other two masts, schooner rigged.
Wikipedia has on sidewheelers: Sidewheelers are used as riverboats and as coastal craft. Though the side wheels and enclosing sponsons make them wider than sternwheelers, they may be more maneuverable, since they can sometimes move the paddles at different speeds, and even in opposite directions. This extra maneuverability makes sidewheelers popular on the narrower, winding rivers of the Murray-Darling system in Australia, where a number still operate.
European sidewheelers, such as PS WAVERLEY, connect the wheels with solid drive shafts that limit maneuverability and give the craft a wide turning radius. Some were built with paddle clutches that disengage one or both paddles so they can turn independently. However, wisdom gained from early experience with sidewheelers deemed that they be operated with clutches out, or as solid shaft vessels. Crews noticed that as ships approached the dock, passengers moved to the side of the ship ready to disembark. The shift in weight, added to independent movements of the paddles, could lead to imbalance and potential capsizing. Paddle tugs were frequently operated with clutches in, as the lack of passengers aboard meant that independent paddle movement could be used safely and the added maneuverability exploited to the full. More info is given on: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murray%E2 ... ling_basin

United Nations 1997 32c sg 729/730 scott 709/710
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