MACKINAW USCGC icebreaker-buoy-tender

Built as a icebreaker-buoy-tender under yard no 601 by Marinette Marine Corporation (MMC), Marinette, USA for the USA Coastguard.

Laid down: February 09, 2004.
Launched: April 2, 2005 under the name USCGC MACKINAW (WLBB-30), the name Mackinaw has its roots in the ancient Native American language of the Great Lakes. Specifically, it is derived from the word Michilimackinac in the Ojibwa language, meaning "Island of the Great Turtle." Both Mackinaw (the English derivation) and Mackinac (the French derivation where "ac" is pronounced "aw") are derived from this word and pronounced Mak'ino.
Displacement 3,500 ton, dim. 73 x 17.8 x 4.9m. (draught), length bpp. 69.9m.
The ship is powered by 3 Caterpillar Turbocharged V-12 engines that drive 2 ABB electric propulsion drives that deliver a combined 9,200 horsepower. They are Caterpillar 3612 engines, turning Kato Generators. Mackinaw has 3 MDG’s. Each producing about 3.5 Megawatts of electric power. Mackinaw has an integrated electric plant. This means that the main generators provide electric power for both propulsion (ABB Azipods) and ship’s electric services (everything else). Speed 16 knots.
Crew 9 officers and 46 enlisted.
Commissioned: June 10, 2006, Homeport: Cheboygan, Michigan IMO No 9271054.

WLBB: The W preceding the number of all Coast Guard ships since World War II signifies them as Coast Guard vessels. WLB is the Coast Guard’s designation for seagoing buoy-tenders. The L stands for load-bearing working boat, and the B specifies its size category (big). The LB designates this vessel as a big buoy-tender, and the last B stands for icebreaker.

USCGC MACKINAW (WLBB-30) is a 240-foot (73 m) vessel built as a heavy icebreaker for operations on the North American Great Lakes for the United States Coast Guard. IMO number: 9271054. She should not be confused with a namesake ship, the USCGC MACKINAW (WAGB-83), IMO number 6119534, which was decommissioned on June 10, 2006.
MACKINAW was delivered to the Coast Guard on November 18, 2005 and commissioned on June 10, 2006. In addition to her ice-breaking duties, the MACKINAW will also serve as an Aids to Navigation ship, able to perform the same duties as the Seagoing Buoy Tenders (WLB) of the Coast Guard fleet. Further, she can conduct law enforcement and search and rescue missions and can deploy an oil skimming system to respond to oil spill situations and environmental response. One of the MACKINAW's unique features in the US Coast Guard fleet is the use of two Azipod units, ABB's brand of electric azimuth thrusters, for her main propulsion. These, coupled with a 550 hp (410 kW) bow thruster, make the ship exceptionally maneuverable. The Azipod units also remove the need for a traditional rudder, as the thrusters can turn 360 degrees around their vertical axis to direct their thrust in any direction. The MACKINAW also lacks a traditional ship's steering wheel. Much of the ship’s technology, including the Azipod thrusters, is from Finnish Maritime Cluster. Additionally, the MACKINAW can continuously proceed through fresh water ice up to 32 inches (81 cm) thick at 3 knots or 14 inches (36 cm) at 10 knots. She can also break smooth, continuous ice up to 42 inches (107 cm) thick through ramming.

The MACKINAW got off to a rocky start before being commissioned. While en-route to her new home port of Cheboygan, Michigan, the MACKINAW struck a seawall in Grand Haven, Michigan on December 12, 2005. The accident caused a 10-foot (3.0 m) dent in the bow of the MACKINAW on her starboard side. Shortly after the accident, Captain Donald Triner, the commanding officer of the MACKINAW, was temporarily relieved of duty pending an investigation into the accident. The accident did not delay the ship's scheduled arrival in her new home port; she arrived on December 17, 2005. Captain Triner was later permanently relieved of duty and replaced by Captain Michael Hudson, who was replaced in turn by Commander John Little in April 2006. CDR Scott J. Smith assumed command in July 2008 and was relieved by CDR Michael J. Davanzo in Aug, 2011. In June 2014, CDR Vasilios Tasikas assumed command. In June 2017, CDR John Stone assumed command. The MACKINAW is stationed at Cheboygan, Michigan. It can be seen and toured at Grand Haven's Coast Guard Festival every summer. The ship was also featured on the television series Modern Marvels. Katmai Bay, stationed at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, helps the USCGC MACKINAW (WLBB-30) in ice breaking duties.
2019 In service.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USCGC_Mackinaw_(WLBB-30) en internet.
Guinea 2018 50000 FG sgMS?, scott?

In the margin you see a freefall lifeboat and a helicopter picking up survivors. I have been sailing on ships fitted with a freefall lifeboat and in my eyes she are the best system for a lifeboat to get safely and very quickly of a vessel.

Wikipedia gives for the freefall lifeboat:
Some ships have a freefall lifeboat stored on a downward sloping slipway normally on the stern of the vessel. These freefall lifeboats drop into the water when the holdback is released. Such lifeboats are considerably heavier as they are strongly constructed to survive the impact with water. Freefall lifeboats are used for their capability to launch nearly instantly, and high reliability in any conditions. Since 2006 they have been required on bulk carriers that are in danger of sinking too rapidly for conventional lifeboats to be released. Seagoing oil rigs are also customarily equipped with this type of lifeboat.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lifeboat_(shipboard)
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WAR PAROE

The full index of our ship stamp archive

WAR PAROE

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Jun 02, 2019 8:51 pm

2000 war paroe.jpg
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India issued in 2000 one stamp for the Maritime Heritage.

The India Post did give the following info on this issues.
India has a rich maritime heritage and the earliest reference to maritime activities is contained in the Rig Veda. Indian mythology has numerous episodes pertaining to the ocean, the sea and the rivers, with belief that mankind has benefitted from the wealth of seas and ocean. There is plenty of evidence derived from Indian literature, art, sculptures, painting and archeology to establish existence of Indian maritime traditions.
A study of the country's maritime history reveals that the Indian sub-continent exercised supremacy over the Indian Ocean from very early times up to the 13th century. Indians took to the sea for trade and commerce rather than for political ends. Thus, the period up to about 16th century witnessed peaceful sea-borne commerce, cultural and traditional exchange between countries. The Indian Ocean has always been regarded as an area of great significance and India is central to this Ocean.
The beginning of India's maritime history dates back to 3000 BC. During this time, the inhabitants of Indus Valley Civilisation had maritime trade link with Mesopotamia. The excavation at Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa has revealed ample evidence that maritime activities flourished during this period.
The discovery of a dry-dock at Lothal (about 400 km Southwest of Ahmedabad) gives an insight into the knowledge of tides, winds and other nautical factors that existed during that period. The dry-dock at Lothal dates back to 2400 BC and is regarded as the first such facility, anywhere in the world, equipped to berth and service ships.
Vedic literature has numerous references to boats, ships and sea voyages. The Rig Veda is the oldest evidence on record that refers to Varuna, the Lord of the Sea, and credits him with the knowledge of the ocean routes which were used by ships. The Rig Veda mentions merchants sailing ships across the oceans to foreign countries in quest of trade and wealth. The epics Ramayana and Mahabharata have references to ships and sea travels. Even the Puranas have several stories of sea voyages.
The discovery of Lothal port and dock (circa 2400-1900 B.C.) bear testimony to this. After the landing of Vasco da Gama in Calicut in 1498 A.D., the Portuguese slowly gained influence and started interfering in the trade. Mohammed Kunjali Marakkar, the first Admiral of Calicut who offered to the Zamorin his sword, ships and services, dedicated his entire energies in fighting the foreign domination of Indian seas. He was the first of the four Kunjalis who played a heroic part in the Naval wars with the Portuguese.
The most famous of the Marakkars was Kunjali IV, who fought the Portuguese more fiercely than his predecessors and with far greater success. However, the initial successes appear to have made him arrogant to the extent of ignoring the authority of the Zamorin. The Portuguese clinched a deal with Zamorin to suppress the 'rebel' Admiral, and in 1600 jointly laid siege of his fort, bringing to an end the long tradition of the legendary Marakkars. Kunjali IV who surrendered to the Zamorin was executed in Goa.
The stamp design shows the “war-paroe”, a small craft used by the Kunjalis, which, manned by just 30-40 men each, could be rowed through lagoons and narrow waters.
Several of these crafts were deployed at strategic points to attack the Portuguese ships, and after the attack returned to the safety of the shallows in these guerrilla raids.

I could not find more info on the WAR PAROE.

The DOP honour of these great Admirals who wrote a heroic chapter in India’s Maritime History.

India 2000 300 Paisa sg?, scott?
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