SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Kazimierz Jaworski

Kazimierz "Kuba" Jaworski (born October 17, 1929 in Augustów, died July 8, 2005 in Szczecin) - Polish sailor, yacht captain of great navigation, yacht constructor.
One of the best Polish sailing sailors. His cruises on yachts of his own design: Spaniel and Spaniel II were symbols of the achievements of Polish sailing.
Kazimierz "Kuba" Jaworski began his adventure with sailing in 1939 on Lake Głęboczek. During the occupation, the family was displaced to Krakow. After the war, he won the first sailing classes in Gdynia, and then he was active in the Krakow Yacht Club "Szkwał". He then starts in regatta in classes "N", "H" and Finn. He organized the Cracow District Sailing Association, in which he was the first president and later a long-term secretary. In the 1960s, he started working in the construction office of the Szczecin yacht shipyard. In 1961, he obtained the patent of the yacht captain of the great shipping. He competed in the regatta on Folkboatach, and in 1969 and 1970 he won the Polish Championship at ENIFA. He was also a champion in the IOR II class on Ogar (70s), and in 1975 he won the Polish Championship in the IOR I class on the Spaniel yacht. In 1976, he ranks 3rd in the general classification in the transatlantic regatta of lone sailors, and in the Jester second class. After the regatta, he was invited as an honor guest of the celebrations of the 200th anniversary of the United States and received the title of honorary citizen of Chicago. On the Spanielek yacht in 1977, in the Mini-Transat regatta, it ranks second. His yacht Spaniel II was the fastest single-hulled yacht on the OSTAR'80 regatta route.
He withdrew from the active sport in the 1980s, after an incomprehensible decision to sell the yacht Spaniel II by the Polish Sailing Association. He was buried at the Central Cemetery in Szczecin (plot 48d). In front of the Szczecin Archcathedral Basilica of Saint. Jakuba stands a monument commemorating Szczecin's yacht captains, among others Kazimierz Jaworski.
He was a co-constructor of the Polonez yacht.
For his achievements, he was awarded the Officer's Cross of the Order of the Rebirth of Poland. Twice he received the Cruise of the Year award - Silver Sextant (1976 and 1977).
Centrafricaine 1961;60f;Sg781.
Source:https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazimierz_Jaworski_(%C5%BCeglarz)

Conny van Rietschoten

Cornelis "Conny" van Rietschoten (23 March 1926 – 17 December 2013) was a Dutch yacht skipper who was the only skipper to win the Whitbread Round the World Race twice. Born in Rotterdam, van Rietschoten was unknown as a sailor even in his own waters before competing in the 1977–78 Whitbread Round the World Race. At 45, the industrialist had retired from active business and was looking for a fresh challenge. He had read reports about the first Whitbread Race, saw it as the opportunity of a lifetime – and grabbed it with both hands. A circumnavigation was something his Father, Jan Jacob, had always wanted to do but never found the time. What set Van Rietschoten ahead of the established sailing names like Sir Robin Knox-Johnston and Éric Tabarly was a professional business approach to his campaigns. His eight-year tenure at the top of the sport spelled the end of amateur gung-ho ocean racing entries. He may well have continued to see himself as an amateur, but he set levels of professionalism within the sport that were not repeated until Peter Blakealso won every leg with his Steinlager 2 in the 1989–90 Whitbread Round the World Race. Van Rietschoten was first to undertake extensive trials and crew training before the race, and invested in research to improve crew clothing, rigs and weather forecasting techniques. For his first Whitbread yacht, Conny van Rietschoten turned to American designers Sparkman & Stephensto design a more modern version of the Swan 65 production yacht Sayula II, which had won the first Whitbread race in 1973/74. The new Flyer, built in aluminium by Jachtwerf W. Huisman, was also a ketch, but with a longer waterline and more sail area. After winning the transatlantic race, the Flyer crew found their greatest rival to be another Swan 65, the sloop rigged British yacht King's Legend, with Nick Ratcliffe as the skipper and American Skip Novak as the navigator. 1,000 miles from Cape Town, the two crews found themselves within sight of each other, before Flyer pulled ahead to win the first leg of the race from Portsmouth by 2 hours 4 minutes. On the second leg to Auckland, New Zealand, King's Legend stole the upper hand, and soon had a 360mile lead over Flyer as the Whitbread fleet raced across the Southern Ocean, but then suffered a leak, which slowed her progress. At the finish, Conny van Rietschoten’s crew had cut King's Legend’slead back to within 1 hour 15 minutes. The third leg around Cape Horn to Rio de Janeiro proved something of an anti-climax as far as the race was concerned, for Kings Legend suffered a broach and water wiped out her radio. Without weather forecasts, Novak and his crew were at a distinct disadvantage and fell almost 60 hours behind Flyer. On the final leg back to Portsmouth, Van Rietschoten and his crew had only to shadow Kings Legend home which they did, finishing 2 hours behind the British yacht, to win the Whitbread Race on handicap. Flyer was recently refitted by the original manufacturer.
The 1981/82 Whitbread Race saw Conny van Rietschoten’s maxi sloop Flyer II designed by German Frers matched against Peter Blake’s 68 ft Bruce Farr designed Ceramco New Zealand. Ceramco New Zealand was dismasted during the first leg to give Flyer II a run-away victory on this first stage of the race to Cape Town, but thereafter, the two yachts raced neck-and-neck around the rest of the world. It was at the height of this competition when Conny van Rietschoten showed the steely side of his character. He suffered a heart attack when their yacht was deep into the Southern Ocean, en route to Auckland, New Zealand. Van Rietschoten swore his crew to secrecy, and would not even allow the Flyer II doctor Julian Fuller to call a cardiologist aboard their rival yacht Ceramco for advice. “The nearest port was 10 days away and the critical period is always the first 24–36 hours,” he recalled later. “Ceramco was already breathing down our necks. If they had known that I had a health problem, they would have pushed their boat even harder. When you die at sea, you are buried over the side. Perhaps those Ceramco boys might then have spotted me drifting by. And that I was determined would be the only thing they would see or hear from Flyer II on the matter!” Flyer II pulled out a 9 hour lead by Auckland, but Ceramco New Zealand won the leg on handicap. The race from there to Cape Horn was one of constantly swapping places. Half way across the Pacific, they were within sight of each other, and also rounded Cape Horn together. Flyer II got to Mar del Plata first to take line honours, but the Ceramco New Zealand crew were rewarded with 2nd on handicap. Conny van Rietschoten and his crew finished first again back at Portsmouth, followed by Ceramco New Zealand to take line honours for the Race, and with the rest of the fleet becalmed near the Azores, took handicap honours too – the first crew to win both line and handicap honours in the history of the Race. Van Rietschoten and his crew also set two world records: The fastest Noon to Noon run of 327 miles, and the fastest circumnavigation of 120 days. In 1948 Conny van Rietschoten and his friend Morin Scott sailed their Dragon class yacht Gerda from Cowes England across the North Sea to Arendal to compete in that year's Dragon Gold Cup world championship. They did not win, but Crown Prince Olaf of Norway proclaimed the two sailors the best at the regatta for sailing by far the furthest distance. Since the 1980s the Conny van Rietschoten Trophy has been awarded each year as the best Dutch sailor.December 2013, Conny van Rietschoten died in Portugal.
Centrafricaine 1961;40f;Sg779.
Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conny_van_Rietschoten

REGINA MARIS 1908 Tall Ship

She was built as a wooden hulled 3-masted topsail schooner by J. Ring-Andersen at Svendborg, Denmark for P Reinhold of Råå, Sweden.
Launched as the REGINA.
Tonnage 173 gross, 63 net, dim. 30.48 x 7.62 x 3.08m.
She was strongly built, designed primarily for the arctic waters.
In the 1920s was she sold to O.B. Bengtson in Råå.
Around 1932/34 was she fitted out with a 2-cyl auxiliary engine manufactured by Bolinders, 49 nhp.
1932 Sold to Gustaf F. Edvardssen, Skarhamn, Sweden
1955 He was still the owner. At that time she had a new oil engine.
1962 She got a fire in the engine room which damaged the ship significantly.
1962 Bought by Siegfried and John Aage Wilson (Ocean Transport Lines) of Arendal, Norway, at that time she was laid up at Ystadt, Sweden.
She was thereafter converted at the Hoivolds Mek. Verksted A/S in Kristiansund for 299.000 Dollars in a brigantine rigged private yacht.
Tonnage 186 gross ton, 42.50 x 7.60 x 3.30 (draught), length of hull 35.00m, length bpp. 30.50m
Fitted out with an 8-cyl Caterpillar diesel of 242 hp.
She was renamed in REGINA MARIS. Homeport Valletta, Malta.

Wikipedia has on her: The sailing ship REGINA MARIS was originally built as the three-masted topsail schooner REGINA in 1908. She was a 144-foot (43.9-meter), wooden, completely fore-and-aft–rigged sailing ship with three masts. She was re-rigged in 1963 as a 148-foot (45.1-meter) barkentine. REGINA MARIS can reach a speed of up to 12 knots, especially on a half-wind course or with a fresh back-stay breeze.
Her original home port was Amsterdam as private yacht ??. Her classification was SI Z1234+, EU 98/18. Her length overall was 48 meters (157 feet). Her beam was 6.90 meters (22.6 feet), with a draught of 2.80 meters (9.2 feet). Her masthead height was 29.00 meters (95 feet). Her displacement was 280 tons with a gross tonnage of 153 tons. She was rigged as a three-masted topsail schooner with a sail area of 720 m² (7,750 square feet) across 11 sails.
Her main engine was an eight-cylinder Caterpillar 3408 that produced 365 hp (272 Kw). Her generators were a Mitsubishi 15 kW and a Lister Petter at 20 kW. Her bunker capacity for gas and oil was 12,000 liters (3,170 U.S. gallons; 2,640 Imperial gallons). Her bunker capacity for fresh water was 16,000 liters (4,227 U.S. gallons; 3,520 Imperial gallons).
Her speed under sail was 12 knots and under engine was 9 knots. Her passenger capacity was up to 80 passengers for short-term voyages and 36 passengers for overnight voyages. She had two two-passenger and eight four-passenger cabins.
History
REGINA was built to ply the Iceland-to-Baltic Sea codfish trade. The original wooden hull was completed in 1908, the 100th hull produced by the shipyard of J. Ring Anderson in Svendborg, Denmark.
On 15 February 1920, REGINA was discovered abandoned in the North Sea. Her crew was rescued by the Swedish steamer FRITIOF. REGINA was towed into IJmuiden, North Holland, Netherlands by the Dutch fishing trawler EENDRACHT II.
REGINA at one time was believed to have been involved in the rescue of Danish Jews during World War II, but this was later disproven.
Until 1963, the ship sailed under Swedish colors and was called REGINA, rigged as a three-masted topsail schooner. Following a severe fire in 1963, was she purchased by the Norwegian shipping magnates Siegfried and John Aage Wilson and converted to serve as the latter's private yacht. Rebuilt with a very tall three-masted barkentine rig for this purpose, the ship was renamed REGINA MARIS ("Queen of the Sea"). Between 1963 and 1984, she was used in many television and movie productions, conducted two global circuits, and underwent stints as a cruise ship, sail training facility, and marine mammal research vessel
For a number of years REGINA MARIS was docked in Gloucester, Massachusetts and was in the possession of the Ocean Research and Education Society (ORES) a local non-profit organization. She was used for day sails and short voyages as scientists and students sampled copepods in the Gulf of Maine, observed whales and other marine mammals but mostly for the pleasure of the Captain....... Volunteers could pay for acting as crew on short voyages and sampled life aboard an old wooden sailing vessel, including standing watch, sleeping in narrow bunks and climbing ratlines, the latter optional. When the organization ran out of money trying to keep REGINA seaworthy it is believed that she was sold to Anthony Athanas of Boston's Pier Four restaurant for use as a stationary party ship. One severely cold night with a loud crack she sank. Soon after she was purchased and raised by a group from Long Island that hoped to return her to seaworthy condition.
The vessel was saved from being scuttled by Captain Robert Val Rosenbaum and moved from Boston. Massachusetts, to Greenport, New York, where Rosenbaum founded the REGINA MARIS Foundation and began a restoration process with 70 local volunteers in 1991. Hurricane Bob hit the east end of Long Island in August 1991, and Captain Rosenbaum scuttled the vessel at her berth to save her from being destroyed by the storm and to prevent the destruction of the nearby historic waterfront buildings. After the storm, the vessel was raised by Captain Rosenbaum and sold for one dollar to facilitate the restoration effort by a newly formed nonprofit organization. During the next eight years the corporation raised money through donations in Greenport to restore the vessel, but the funds were misappropriated and never found their way into the ship.
The vessel was towed to Glen Cove, New York, in 1998 as part of a plan to revitalize the city′s waterfront. Plans to restore the ship were hampered by the discovery that she was not involved in rescuing Jewish refugees in World War II, as well as the economic impact of the September 11 attacks in 2001. The ship was chronically leaky and sank at the dock in 2002. Efforts to raise her in 2003 damaged her beyond repair. The deck, gunnels, deckhouse, bowsprit, masts, and rigging were preserved and set in concrete on the nearby esplanade

Timeline
Cargo schooner 1908–1963 (Commercial cargo years)
Private yacht 1963–1970 (Wilson years)
Cruise ship 1971–1973
Sail training and movie Set 1973–1976 (Willoughby years)
Research and sail training 1976–1984 (Ocean Research & Education Society)
From wharf-side attraction to ship's demise 1985–1990
Regina Maris Foundation and Hurricane Bob 1991
Save the Regina Maris (non-profit) 1992-1998

Source: Wikipedia. Lloyds Register, Great Sailing Ships of the World by Otmar Schäuffelen.
French Polynesia 1974 15f sg184, scott ?

Olivier de Kersauson

Olivier de Kersauson (full name: Olivier de Kersauson de Pennendreff, born 20 July 1944) is a Frenchsailor and sailing champion. Kersauson was the seventh child in a family of eight. While he was the only Kersauson not to have been born in Brittany, he was born on 20 July 1944 and brought up near Morlaix in a “provincial Catholic aristocracy with compulsory mass” as he calls it. Very early on, Olivier de Kersauson was to break away from his family. Without being inattentive, he was a pupil who did not settle in well to school life with the priests at boarding school. He passed through eleven schools altogether. After his final school exams and getting up to a lot of things, always on the coast, he began studying economics. At the age of twenty-two, he met Eric Tabarly in Saint Malo. Shortly after, Eric invited him to do his military service on board. This opportunity stretched into eight years during which he was Tabarly’s mate. Together, they put on their boots and waterproofs, swallowing up the miles aboard the Pen Duicks. Very quickly, Olivier de Kersauson developed a passion for multihulls in which he became a pioneer. He was, in particular, the first to build a multihull of composite material, Ribourel, then a trimaran with long floaters, Poulain, at the helm of which he set in 1989-1990 the single-handed round the world speed record. From 1992 onwards, he spent his time working towards the Jules Verne Trophy, the round the world crew record. Wearing the livery of Lyonnaise des Eaux - Dumez, in 1994, he raced around the world against Peter Blake. At the helm of his catamaran Enza, the New Zealander and his six-member crew managed to go around the world in 74 days and 22 hours, while the five Frenchmen took 77 days and five hours. Remaining determined, he made some improvements to his boat and wearing the livery of Sport Elec, took off again around the world. On 8 March 1997, Olivier de Kersauson and his six-man crew left Brest. They were to return triumphant 71 days, 14 hours, 22 minutes and 8 seconds later, improving by more than a week on Peyron’s first time. In 2001, he named his giant trimaran Geronimo, "because Geronimo never gave up. It was at the helm of this boat that Olivier de Kersauson took the Jules Verne Trophy for the second time in 2004 (63 days, 13 hours, 59 minutes). In January 2003, Kersauson claimed that his boat was attacked by a giant squid.
Centrafricaine 1961;100f;Sg783. Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olivier_de_Kersauson

RAIATEA canoe

This stamp designed after a painting made by Herb Kane shows us a canoe from Rurutu, noting I could find on the canoes of Rurutu only what was given by the British missionary Ellis who visited this islands around 1820. Have searched the net for more info, but I think this canoe is now extinct.
The stamp shows a canoe, who has a very high stem and stern. The painting after the stamp was designed is showed http://herbkanehawaii.com/image-catalog ... moorea-c5/
Ellis wrote about this canoe:
One canoe, that brought a chief from Rurutu, upwards of three hundred miles, was very large. It was somewhat in the shape of a crescent, the stern and stem high and pointed, and the sides broad; the depth from the upper edge of the middle to the keel was not less than twelve feet. It was built with thick planks of the Barringtonia, some of which were four feet wide; they were sewn together with twisted or braided coconut husk.
http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarl ... d2-d8.html

French Polynesia 1976 30f sg 228, scott?

VAKA TOU'UA canoe of the Marquesas Islands

The stamp issued by French Polynesia in 1976 shows us a “vaka tou’ua” canoe, the stamp is designed after a painting made by Herb Kane, who also designed the four stamps see: http://herbkanehawaii.com/image-catalog ... lands-c40/
The inscription on the painting gives that she is a “va’a tou’ua”.
The word waka or vaka are many time used for canoes on the Pacific Islands, and means canoe.

Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft, has nothing on the “waka tou’ua” but only for the ‘vaka tou’uá” it gives for the canoe:
The “vaka tou’uá used in the Marquesas Island and Eastern Pacific, is now an extinct double canoe and was used for interisland travel, war, and probably migration.
Dugout hulls of roughly the same length, joined by three stout beams; especially large canoes required butting two logs together; sides raised by washstrakes. Form of ends variously depicted; some projected horizontally at both ends, stern sweeping up to a lofty stylized bird’s head, or both ends curved up to tall end pieces. Some had a platform (hou ua) laid atop the booms; often used by warriors. Sailed and paddled. Single V-shaped mat sail set to a mast stepped forward crossbeam.
Length at least 12m

Source: Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft
French Polynesia 1976 25f sg 227, scott?
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ULSTER MONARCH

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ULSTER MONARCH

Postby shipstamps » Mon Oct 27, 2008 4:38 pm

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Built as a ferry under yard No. 635 by Harland & Wolff at Belfast for the Belfast Steamship Co. Belfast.
24 January 1929 launched under the name ULSTER MONARCH, two sisters ULSTER PRINCE and ULSTER QUEEN.
Tonnage 3.735 grt, 1.781 net, 828 dwt. Dim. 358.9 x 46 x 14.10ft. (draught).
Powered by two 10-cyl. B&W diesel engines manufactured by shipsbuilder, 7.500 bhp., twin screws, speed 18 knots.
Accommodation for 418 first class, 86 third class passengers, later altered in 391 first class and 58 third class.
Loading capacity of ca. 700 tons.
11 June 1929 delivered to owners.

After delivery used in the night service from Belfast to Liverpool, in the Ulster Imperial Line.
Mostly the vessels in this service sailed from Liverpool at 22.15 with arrival time Belfast the next morning at 07.30. The same day in the evening at 21.00 she sailed from Belfast and arrived the next morning at 07.30 at Liverpool. During the stay in port during daytime, the cargo was discharged and loaded.

Till the outbreak of World War II she was used in this service till 07 September 1939, after arrival in Liverpool she got orders to proceed to Southampton.
11 September 1939 she made her first troop transport across the English Channel to France.
21 September 1939 she was transferred to the Bristol Channel and from there she left with troops on 24 September for Quiberon Bay, she made two voyages more to this destination from the Bristol Channel.

She was then released from trooping duties on 13 October and headed for Liverpool.
Two months later she was required again for trooping duties and made regular sailings from Southampton to Le Havre and Cherbourg.
08 January 1940 she went aground at Dunnose in the Isle of Wight.

24 April 1940 she received orders to proceed direct from Cherbourg to Scottish waters, was delayed for some time off Dover, at least headed north up the coast of East England.
26 April 1940 at Leith she embarked troops for Scapa Flow, but before she sailed the situation in Norway was deteriorating and her troops were disembarked and she had to join a convoy to Andaisness, Norway after arrival there the town was burning after a air raid of a German air-attack. After she moored she received orders to leave full speed out of the fjord, which she did.
Off the land she was attacked by an aircraft, dropping four bombs near the starboard side and four more on the port side, but she escaped with only deck doors blown off there hinges.
She sailed to Scapa Flow where she loaded 100 tons of ceased aviation fuel and naval and military personnel, with as deck cargo more as 50 barrels fuel oil for her one use.
10 May she sailed from Scapa Flown bound for Harstad in Norway, under constant air attacks she discharged her men and cargo there, and loaded some fish, which during bombing was killed in the water near her, embarked troops and sailed for the Clyde on 16 May.
31 May, she made an other voyage to Narvik, Norway to load there material and troops, when the Allied troops were withdrawn from that port.

14 June 1940 she left with Polish and French troops on board from the River Clyde, arrived Brest 16 June, on arrival there the French troops embarked but the 400 Polish troops seeing that the end of the war in French was nearing, decided to stay on board, the empty space was filled with British troops before she sailed on 17 June from Brest, she was the last troopship that left from this port, she was bound for Falmouth.
02 July, her next voyage was with French servicemen from Liverpool to repatriate these men to Morocco.
Then she made a roundtrip from Gibraltar to Madeira, starting 21 July before she headed to Glasgow where she arrived 3 August.
Then she made two voyages northwards first with troops to the Faroe Islands, and in September with 700 troops on board to Iceland.
24 September she sailed for the U.K. again.

05 October 1940 renamed in HMS ULSTER MONARCH, fitted out at Glasgow.
Armament 1 – 12pdr. and 4 – 20mm guns.
17 January 1941 arrived at the Inveraray Combined Operations Base.
March assigned to Operation Puma, the planning landings at Las Palmas, in the event that Gibraltar was falling in enemy hands.
From 22 till 28 July she made a roundtrip to Iceland, following by exercises at Scapa as training for the Puma Operations, at that time the name was changed to Pilgrim Operations.

16 September she sailed from the Clyde bound for Freetown where she arrived on 05 October, later moved to Takoradi and Lagos.
She made two voyages north to Gibraltar, first on 18 November, the second on 10 February 1942, when she sailed from Gibraltar with on board 655 troops bound for Bathurst.
Then she embarked servicemen from Freetown to Lagos where she arrived 10 March.
After she returned in Freetown she took on board troops and via the Azores sailed to the Clyde where she arrived 11 April 1942.

Between 19 April and the end of June she got a refit in Liverpool as a Infantry Landing Ship, and on 31 July arrived in the Solent to receive six landingscraft, thereafter she was a unit of Operation Torch.
26 October 1942 with on board US Rangers she sailed from the Clyde.
07 November arrived Arzeu Bay and at 23.41 troops were embarked, before she headed to Arzue harbour the next morning where her stores were unloaded.
17.15 The same day moved again to the anchorage.
21 November 1942 arrived again in the Clyde without her landing craft but with on board 120 survivors from HM cutters HARTLAND and WALNEY which both were lost during Operation Torch.

Then she was used during Operation Husky, the landing in Sicily.
13 March 1943 sailed from the U.K. and via Gibraltar, Freetown and the Cape of Good Hope sailed to Suez to join Force G on 14 March.
Took part in the Combined Operations exercises in the Gulf of Aquaba, where after she embarked troops, transited the Suez Canal on the first of July.
Became a unit of the assault convoy which sailed from Port Said on 05 July bound for Sicily.
Her troops were landed on 10 July at Acid North Beach-head near Syracuse.
Two days later she landed a SAS unit south of Augusta.

Then she took part in Operation Avalanche.
She was attacked on 19 Augustus at 00.12 off Cape Bon, Tunisia in a bright and moonlight night, the plane came from astern and dropt a bomb on her after 12 pdr. gun, the explosion pierced two decks down, killing three crewmembers, and set the ULSTER MONARCH on fire. The fire was brought under control within 40 minutes and she proceeded to Tripoli where she underwent some repair.
06 September sailed from Tripoli as part of the Northern Attack Force R for the landing at Salerno and the mainland of Italy.
Her troops and equipment were discharged on 09 September, and on 11 September she brought some reinforcements from Bizerte to Taranto.
05 October she disembarked personnel and landingscrafts at the Combined Operations base at Djedjelli before she headed to the Clyde for a refit.

She took part in Operation Neptune, the landings in Normandy.
16 February 1944 sailed from the Clyde bound for the English South Coast in preparation for the Normandy landings...
05 June 1944 sailed from the Solent in Assault Convoy J9 and put her troops ashore on Juno Beach early the next morning. She headed then to Plymouth to embark reinforcements for France, the rest of the year was used in these Channel crossings with reinforcements.
01 January 1945 arrived in the Thames Estuary and on 03 January sailed from Tilbury to Ostend, Belgium in the Forces Duty Service between these two ports.

19 May 1945 her landingscrafts and launching equipment were removed.
April 1945 she got engine problems and was out of service till 19 June, before she resumed her trooping duties from Tilbury, Dover and Harwich.
07 September 1945 sailed from Tilbury and arrived 09 September at Belfast.
01 October 1945 paid off.
After repairs which took a long time she arrived at Liverpool on 13 August 1946 to resume her service between Belfast and Liverpool.

October 1946 sold for scrap.
08 December 1966 arrived by the breakers yard of van Heyghen in Ghent, Belgium for scrapping.

Maldives 1997 3r sg 2687, scott 2226e.

Source: Merchant Ships of the world in color 1910-1929 by Lawrence Dunn. Register of Merchant Ships completed in 1929. Short Sea Long War by John de S. Winser.
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