SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

NAU

Suriname issued in 1992 one stamp for the expelling of the Jews from Spain in 1492, the stamp shows a Spanish, Portuguese sailing ship from that time and named by Stanley Gibbons as a “nau”. The rigging looks a bit strange on the nau depict on the stamp, it shows a four mast ship, square sails on the fore and main mast and two lateen sails on the other two masts. Most naus carry on the fore and main mast also a topsail not visible on the stamp.

Nau is the generic term for a 14th to 16th century ship in Catalan, Spain. During the 15th -17th centuries could be synonymous with “nef”, “carrack” or “galleon; later with a frigate type vessel. Sometimes term was given to the major ship in a convoy. Some scholars include in the term all vessels of western origin with keels. Many Basque built in the 16th century.
In general high-sided with castles forward and aft, 2 – 3 decks, beamy, short keel; deep hull and a midline rudder. Estimated to have been between 120 – 500 ton.

Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.

Wikipedia has more on the settlement of the Jews in Suriname.
Suriname has the oldest Jewish community in the Americas. During the Inquisition in Portugal and Spain around 1500, many Jews fled to the Netherlands and the Dutch colonies to escape social discrimination and inquisitorial persecution, sometimes including torture and condemnation to the stake. Those who were converted to the Catholic faith were called New Christians, conversos, and, less often, "Marranos". The stadtholder of the King of Portugal gave those who wanted to depart some time to let them settle, and supplied them with 16 ships and safe conduct to leave for the Netherlands. The Dutch government gave an opportunity to settle in Brazil (at that time part of Brazil was a colony of the Netherlands). Most found their home in Recife, and merchants became cocoa growers. But the Portuguese in Brazil forced many Jews to move into the northern Dutch colonies in the Americas, The Guyanas. Jews settled in Suriname in 1639.

Suriname was one of the most important centers of the Jewish population in the Western Hemisphere, and Jews there were planters and slaveholders.

For a few years, when World War II arrived, many Jewish refugees from the Netherlands and other parts of Europe fled to Suriname. Today, 2,765 Jews live in Suriname.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_o ... n#Suriname
Surinam 1992 250c sg1529, scott 927.

CHINESE POST BOAT type sampan

Uganda issued in 1997 a miniature sheet for the “PACIFIC 97” World Philatelic Exhibition in San Francisco, USA, the top stamp shows us a Chinese Post boat under sail.

She is a “sampan” in China it is the general term for a small boat that can’t otherwise be classified as a junk, barge etc.
Word originally used mainly by foreigners, but now frequently used by the Chinese themselves. Design and use vary widely, depending on local needs and customs. Some carry cargo, produce and livestock, other ferry passengers; some are floating kitchens; many are used as a fishing boat;and often used as houseboats. Characteristically she has a plank between the stern wings as seen on the stamp.
The sampan is generally rowed or sculled but occasionally raise a small cloth, battened lugsail as seen on stamp to a midship mast.
Dimensions: some are 6.5m long, 1.5m beam and 0.61m deep.

Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.
Uganda1997 800s sg 1859, scott 1496a

FORWARD brig + Jules Verne

For the 100th anniversary of the death of Jules Verne (1828-1905). Liberia issued a miniature sheet in 2005, which show on 1 stamp the brig FORWARD in the ice. The book gives she was 170 ton, and also fitted out with an auxiliary steam engine.

The Adventures of Captain Hatteras (French: Voyages et aventures du capitaine Hatteras) is an adventure novel by Jules Verne in two parts: The English at the North Pole (French: Les Anglais au pôle nord) and The desert of ice (French: Le Désert de glace).
The novel was published for the first time in 1864. The definitive version from 1866 was included into Voyages Extraordinaires series (The Extraordinary Voyages). Although it was the first book of the series it was labeled as number two. Three of Verne's books from 1863-65 (Five Weeks in a Balloon, Journey to the Center of the Earth, and From the Earth to the Moon) were added into the series retroactively. Captain Hatteras shows many similarities with British explorer John Franklin.

Plot summary
The novel, set in 1861, described adventures of British expedition led by Captain John Hatteras to the North Pole. Hatteras is convinced that the sea around the pole is not frozen and his obsession is to reach the place no matter what. Mutiny by the crew results in destruction of their ship but Hatteras, with a few men, continues on the expedition. On the shore of the island of "New America" he discovers the remains of a ship used by the previous expedition from the United States. Doctor Clawbonny recalls in mind the plan of the real Ice palace, constructed completely from ice in Russia in 1740 to build a snow-house, where they should spend a winter. The travelers winter on the island and survive mainly due to the ingenuity of Doctor Clawbonny (who is able to make fire with an ice lens, make bullets from frozen mercury and repel attacks by polar bears with remotely controlled explosions of black powder).
When the winter ends the sea becomes ice-free. The travelers build a boat from the shipwreck and head towards the pole. Here they discover an island, an active volcano, and name it after Hatteras. With difficulty a fjord is found and the group get ashore. After three hours climbing they reach the mouth of the volcano. The exact location of the pole is in the crater and Hatteras jumps into it. As the sequence was originally written, Hatteras perishes in the crater; Verne's editor, Jules Hetzel, suggested or rather required that Verne do a rewrite so that Hatteras survives but is driven insane by the intensity of the experience, and after return to England he is put into an asylum for the insane. Losing his "soul" in the cavern of the North Pole, Hatteras never speaks another word. He spends the remainder of his days walking the streets surrounding the asylum with his faithful dog Duke. While mute and deaf to the world, Hatteras' walks are not without a direction. As indicated by the last line "Captain Hatteras forever marches northward".

New America
New America is the name given to a large Arctic island, a northward extension of Ellesmere Island, as discovered by Captain John Hatteras and his crew. Its features include, on the west coast, Victoria Bay, Cape Washington, Johnson Island, Bell Mountain, and Fort Providence, and at its northern point (87°5′N 118°35′W87.083°N 118.583°W), Altamont Harbour.

As with many of Verne's imaginative creations, his description of Arctic geography was based on scientific knowledge at the time the novel was written (1866) but foreshadowed future discoveries. Ellesmere Island had been re-discovered and named by Edward Inglefield in 1852 and further explored by Isaac Israel Hayes in 1860-61. Forty years after the novel's publication, in 1906, Robert Peary claimed to have sighted Crocker Land around 83° N, and in 1909, Frederick Cook sighted Bradley Land at 85° N, both at locations occupied by Verne's New America. Cook's choice of route may actually have been inspired by his reading of Verne/
The land is named by Captain Altamont, an American explorer, who is first to set foot on the land. In the novel as published, it is unclear whether New America is meant to be a territorial claim for the United States. As William Butcher points out, this would not be surprising, since Verne wrote about the US acquisition of Alaska in The Fur Country, and Lincoln Island is proposed as a US possession in The Mysterious Island.[2] In fact, a deleted chapter, "John Bull and Jonathan," had Hatteras and Altamont dueling for the privilege of claiming the land for their respective countries.
Adaptation

In 1912, Georges Méliès made a film based on the story entitled Conquest of the Pole (French: Conquête du pôle).

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adven ... n_Hatteras
Liberia 2005 sg?, scott 2333a.

LIBYAN ANCIENT SHIPS issue 1983

Libya issued six stamps in 1983 to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of the Internationale Maritime Organization, The stamps show ancient types of ships which have been sailing in the Mediterranean.

Phoenician berime 100dh sg1303, scott 1090 viewtopic.php?f=2&t=11213&p=11918&hilit=phoenician#p11918

Ancient Greek penteconter war galley 100dh sg 1304, scott 1092. https://www.militaryfactory.com/ancient ... enteconter

Ancient Pharaoh Egyptian ship 100dh sg1305, scott 1095. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14305&p=16144&hilit=ancient+Egyptian+ship#p16144

Roman trading ship 100 dh sg1306 scott 1093. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10015&p=10398&hilit=roman+trading+ship#p10398

Viking longship 100 dh sg1307, scott1091. viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10360&p=10855&hilit=viking+longship#p10855

Libyan xebec rigged ship 100dh sg 1308, scott1094.
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10503&p=11928#p11928

Libya 1983 sg 1303/08. Scott 1090/95.

Admiral Ibrahim Pasha and Egyptian fleet

For the 100th anniversary of the death of Ibrahim Pasha (1789-1848) Egypt issued 1 stamp of 10M which shows on the right a portrait of Admiral Ibrahim Pasha with on the left what is believed the Egyptian fleet, Stanley Gibbons gives that it shows the “Battle of Navarino in 1827”.
Wikipedia has the following on Admiral Ibrahim Pasha: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibrahim_Pasha_of_Egypt

Egypt 1948 10m sg 351, scott 272.

paddlesteamer

Yugoslavia issued in 1997 a miniature sheet for the National Stamp Exhibition JUFN XI in Belgrado, the MS shows in the top margin a paddle steamer on which I have not any information.

Yugoslavia 1997 5ND sgMS?, scott?
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

Neuralia

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Neuralia

Postby shipstamps » Mon Oct 20, 2008 5:21 pm

SG212.jpg
SG212
Click image to view full size
Scan 165.jpeg
Click image to view full size
British India liner Neuralia, well-known for her many years of service to the nation as a troop transport. With her sister ship Nevasa, she was designed for the United Kingdom-Calcutta service of the British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. and was launched by Barclay, Curle and Co. Ltd. on September 12, 1912.
A vessel of 9,082 gross tons (later increased to 9,182), she had a deadweight capacity of 9,920 tons on a draft of 28 ft. 4 ins. Her overall length was 500 ft. and she had a beam of 58 ft. and depth of 34 ft. There were three complete decks.
Two quadruple-expansion engines having cylinder dimensions of 231/4 ins., 33 ins., 47 ins, and 68 ins, in diameter and a stroke of 48 ins, drove twin screws and took steam at 215 lbs. per sq. in. from seven single-ended coal-fired cylindrical boilers. The machinery gave the ship a normal speed of 141/2 knots. Accommodation was provided for 128 first and 98 second-class passengers.
The Neuralia (her name was a shortened version of that borne by a hill station in Ceylon) had hardly time to settle down to regular service when the First World War began and she was requisitioned as a troopship. In June 1915 she was converted into a hospital ship and among the places she visited were Suvla Bay and Salonika during the Dardanelles campaign that year. After the armistice she was released and following a refit reverted to her normal commercial life once more, on the United Kingdom—India or East Africa services.
In 1925 the ship was converted into a permanent troopship for the British Government. For the next 14 years she carried out trooping voyages to many parts of the world, principally between Southampton and India, but also to and from Malta, Egypt and Singapore. Her normal peace time complement of troops was about 1,000 men. Although a transport, she remained under British India ownership and management and in the 1930s she initiated a scheme of carrying parties of schoolboys on cheap cruises to Scandinavian waters during the non-trooping seasons—an idea which may be regarded as the forerunner of the present British India educational cruises.
In 1940 the Neuralia was one of the ships in the second convoy carrying Australian troops which reached the Eastern Mediterranean in the late spring, shortly before Italy declared war. After disembarking the troops at Port Said, she sailed to Cyprus, returning with a full complement of Cypriots anxious to leave an island threatened with occupation. She next sailed from Port Said through the Straits of Gibraltar to Dakar where she embarked 2,000 French native troops and set course for the Bay of Biscay. On passage news was received of the fall of France and the vessel put back to Dakar, disembarked the troops and then sailed for Gibraltar.
There followed a period of carrying refugees, some of them to Jamaica. On returning from the last of these trips, the convoy in which the Neuralia was sailing was repeatedly attacked by U-boats over a period of several days.
When Japan declared war, the Neuralia was one of several British India ships employed in taking refugees from Rangoon. Two days after the city fell to the Japanese, she was lying at Madras when orders were received to proceed to Port Blair, in the Andaman Islands, and take off all who wished to leave. She set out across the Bay of Bengal escorted most of the way by a cruiser. Sailing unharmed through the Manners Strait, which had been mined, she passed the reefs outside the entrance to Port Blair and succeeded in entering the inner harbour, a feat never before performed by a vessel of her size. Taking on board all who wished to be evacuated, she sailed again a few hours later, at two o'clock in the morning, guided through the reefs by a launch showing a small light in her stern.
She spent 1943 partly in the Far East and partly in the Mediterranean, where, among other duties, she carried troops to Tripoli, Augusta, Taranto and Naples, and found herself at the end of April 1944 at Algiers. From this port she sailed for Glasgow and a quick refit and then proceeded to London, where she joined other ships preparing for the invasion of Normandy. On June 5, 1944, she passed down the river and at dawn next day was at her "battle station" opposite the "Omaha" and "Utah" beaches.
The Neuralia sailed back and forth between the beaches and Southampton until the following October, when she returned to London for a major overhaul. During the period she had made 14 trips and carried a total of 27,000 men of the Imperial and United States Armies. After Normandy she sailed, via the Azores, to Alexandria and then made three voyages to Greece, carrying Greek prisoners-of-war from Egypt. She also took Greek troops from Athens to various parts of Greece.
Then came her last mission. She was ordered to take some 1,700 Yugo-Slav refugees, who had been living in camps in the Canal Zone, back to their native country, now freed from German occupation. She set out for the port of Spalato, now called Split, on the Adriatic coast. Reaching there during the last week of April 1945, she landed her passengers and put to sea again for Taranto, where she was scheduled to take on board a full complement of German prisoners-of-war. She never arrived.
The vessel was coming round the heel of Italy, just turning into the Gulf of Taranto, on May 1, 1945, when at 02.00 hours she was shaken by a violent explosion. She had struck a mine which had exploded in the engine room, immediately flooding that vital space, and it seemed unlikely that she could survive for very long.
The order was given to abandon ship, but the Neuralia did not sink at once, remaining afloat until dawn, when she started to list to port. Soon she was on her beam ends and then started to sink by the stern, and as the after end of the ship disappeared from view, the forepart reared up out of the water and hung motionless for a few moments before it gradually slipped back out of sight among a froth of bubbles.
Thus sank the Neuralia a week before Germany's unconditional surrender. For more than 30 years she had been sailing the seas as a trooper and had served through two world wars.
SG212 Sea Breezes 7/67
shipstamps
Site Admin
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:12 pm

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot], Google [Bot] and 56 guests