SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.

The editor of Log book will retire this coming August and, unless a new one comes forward, the society will close.
With this in mind, we are not taking in any new members.
This is an unfortunate situation but seemingly unavoidable.

CHRISTIANA, JOMFRUEN and ATLANTIC SUN

Norway issued in 2008 a series of stamp for tourism in the country, two have a maritime theme.

So far I know the small vessels on this stamp of Oslo Harbour with in the background the City Hall have not been identified, in the last Watercraft Philately of Nov/Dec 2018 in an article by Dan Rodlie he gives the names and details of the three vessels on this stamp as, from the left to the right as CHRISTIANIA, JOMFRUEN and the ATLANTIC SUN.

The Oslo City Hall is the political and administrative heart of the city. It has an important place in the history of Norwegian art and architecture and is visited by more than 100,000 guests and tourists every year. Its two towers, best seen from the sea, stand 66 and 63 metres high. The bells on the top of the east tower provide pleasure for many people, as they play tunes every hour on the hour from 7 am to 12 pm each day.

On the stamp of Lyngor Lighthouse, the sail yacht is not identified, maybe one of the readers has a name for the yacht?
In the days of sailing ships, Lyngor was one of the most important harbours on the Skagerrak coast. It is now a popular place for holidays. Narrow, cemented paths, flanked by white picket fences, wind their way over these vehicle-free islands. Boats are the only means of transport in this South Norwegian Venice.
When Lyngor Lighthouse was finished in 1879, householders in Lyngor celebrated the event by putting lights in their windows. It had been touch and go whether the lighthouse would be built. The authorities had not recommended it, but men from the region with money and good contacts in the Storting took action and produced results. Today we call that lobbying!

CHRISTIANIA:
Built as wooden 3 mast fore-and aft schooner (borgåskute) by Paul Grünquist & Co shipyard in Valax, Finland
Launched as HELGA
Tonnage 143 gross, 85 net, 230 dwt, dim. ? x 24.5 x 9.10ft
Auxiliary oil engine hp?
1948 Delivered to owners.

Lloyds Registry 1955/56 gives for the HELGA as owner Gustaf Holmberg, at Borgå, Finland. Most probably he was also the owner when built.
1994 Sold to Norway Yacht Charter A/A, Oslo and renamed CHRISTIANIA (the former name of Oslo) and restored in her original condition.
Tonnage 123 gross, 38 net, dim. 45.70 x 7.45 x 2.61m, (draught), length of hull 33.20m
Sail area 550 square meters. 10 sails.
Auxiliary engine Caterpillar 6-cyl. diesel, 365 hp.
Crew 5-9, day passengers 150.
Used as a passenger sailing ship in the charter business around Oslo Fjord. When not in use moored in front of the Oslo City Hall.
2019 In service.

JOMFRUEN:
Built as a motor cutter BRILLIANT in Hardanger on the west coast of Norway in 1917.
For many years she carried mackerel from ports around Bergen and Stavanger to the fishmarket in Oslo.
On her return voyages from Oslo she hauled cement from Slemmestad outside Oslo to the west coast of Norway. She continued trading mainly along the western Norwegian coastline until 1984.
From 1984 in spring of 1988 she was converted into a passenger sailing vessel and used as a party-ship and for social activities based in Oslo.
Tonnage 49 Gt, 19net, dim. 1970 x 5.30 x 2.60m. (draught)
Accommodation for 65 passengers.
Her name was at one time changed to BLÅVEIS until she was renamed JOMFRUEN in 2000.
2019 Owned by Norway Yacht Charter A/s, Oslo and in active service.

ATLANTIC SUN:
1994 Built as a passenger vessel by the Porsgrunn Maskineringssenter in Porsgrunn, Norway for the Atlantic Boat Ltd. AS, Oslo.
Tonnage 118 grt, 48 net, dim. 24.10 x 6.16 x 1.60m.
Powered by two General Motors engines.
Delivered under the name ATLANTIC SUN.

She has been used in the tourist traffic on the Oslo Fjord.
2019 In service, sane name and owner, IMO No 9068108.

Source: http://www.philatelism.com/details.php?issueid=2295
Otmar Schäuffelen, Die letzten grossen Segelschiffe; Various Norwe-gian Illustrated Shipping registry; http://www.tallship-fan.de/index_e.htm; D. Rodlie. Lloyds Register 1955/56

Norway 2008 7Kr. sg?, scott 1542

CARAVEL UNDER CONSTRUCTION COLUMBUS 1492

Of the many stamps and miniature sheets used for the 500th anniversary that Columbus discovered America, most of this stamps and miniature sheet have almost all the same design, only the miniature sheet issued by the Bahamas in 1990 is quite different.

The image is a woodcut from the book “Liber Chronicarum” of the chronicler Hartmann Schedel (1414-1514).

The book describe the Latin world history from the creation till the year 1493.
The book of 650 pages was printed in 1493 by Anton Koberger in Nürenberg. A German translation made by S. Alt is published in the same year.

The 645 (in a other edition over the 1000) woodcuts were made by Michel Wohlgemut (1437-1519) and Wilhelm Pleydenwurff (1462-1494).
On the miniature sheet of the Bahamas is depict the building of Noah’s Ark, the part with the Latin text is omitted.

If we pay attention to the following.
Columbus discovered Cuba on 28 October 1492, he returned to Spain were her arrived on 15 March 1493. At that time the chronicle of Hartmann Schedels was already by the printer, so this woodcut can’t represent the vessel of Columbus.
So this image can’t document the journey of Columbus.
The Post of the Bahamas is free to illustrate the life of Columbus with the Ark of Noah, if the image of the Ark is a caravel.

The artist who made this woodcut went into the wrong when he took a caravel as an example for the construction of Noah's Ark, and did not portray the Ark as a square box as most artists from that time portray the Ark.

This woodcut was made in the time of Columbus, while the miniature sheet has the imprint of a “Caravel under construction”. That the picture of the construction of a caravel fits in with the time of Columbus, and is therefore not from the time of the Arch of Noah.

So anyhow a good design of the Bahamas Post.

Source: Translated from Navicula.
Bahamas 1990 $1.50 sgMS 874, scott 692

DORIS

Guyana issued in 2018 two miniature sheets for “Fishing in Guyana”, the fishing boat depict in the border of the MS shows us fishing boats pulled on the beach. The fish most probably you can find in the Guyana waters but the depicted fishing boats have never seen this waters.
She are taken from a painting made by the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh in 1888 and show “Fishing boats on the beach at Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer in South France, the original you can find in the van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

The fishing boats depict are “doris” of which Aak to Zumbra gives: The French doris was originally carried on board “morutiers and “terreneuviers” and she is till today used for fishing inshore, gathering seaweed, and collecting sand. Locally modified to meet special conditions and type of use.
Some half-decked; others a raised cabin forward. Double tholepins used when rowing. Various rigs employed; ketch, cutter, sloop, spirit, lug, lateen. Now most used an outboard motor or inboard motor, and may be constructed of aluminium and she have a pilot house.

(the depicted boats are made of wood.)
Reported length 3.2 – 7m.; e.g. length 7m, beam 2.2m, depth 1.0m.

Turkey 1990 700li sg3090, scott 2482.
Guyana 2018 $16 and $8.50 sgMS?, scott?

VIKING LONGSHIP and Isle of Man

The Isle of Man issued in 1989 four stamps and a miniature sheet that the island was under the Vikings influence.
21p show a figurehead of a Viking ship.
25p shows a Viking warship from ahead at sea.
31p shows a Viking warship it looks sitting on the beach.
75p show the prow of a Viking ship.
£1.00 The MS shows also a prow of a Viking ship entering a port.

More on the Viking ships is given on: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10360&p=19116&hilit=viking+longship#p19116
Wikipedia has on this time of the Viking Age and Norse kingdom at Isle of Man.

Kingdom of the Isles
The period of Scandinavian domination is divided into two main epochs – before and after the conquest of Mann by Godred Crovan in 1079. Warfare and unsettled rule characterize the earlier epoch; the later saw comparatively more peace.
Between about AD 800 and 815 the Vikings came to Mann chiefly for plunder; between about 850 and 990, when they settled there, the island fell under the rule of the Scandinavian Kings of Dublin; and between 990 and 1079, it became subject to the powerful Earls of Orkney.
There was a mint producing coins on Mann between c. 1025 and c. 1065. These Manx coins were minted from an imported type 2 Hiberno-Norse penny die from Dublin. Hiberno-Norse coins were first minted under Sihtric, King of Dublin. This illustrates that Mann may have been under the thumb of Dublin at this time.
The conqueror Godred Crovan was evidently a remarkable man, though little is known about him. According to the Chronicon Manniae he subdued Dublin, and a great part of Leinster, and held the Scots in such subjection that supposedly no one who set out to build a vessel dared to insert more than three bolts. The memory of such a ruler would be likely to survive in tradition, and it seems probable therefore that he is the person commemorated in Manx legend under the name of King Gorse or Orry. He created the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles in around 1079; it included the south-western islands of Scotland until 1164, when two separate kingdoms were formed from it. In 1154, what was later to be known as the Diocese of Sodor and Man was formed by the Catholic Church.
The islands which were under his rule were called the Suðr-eyjar (south isles, in contradistinction to the Norðr-eyjar, or the "north isles", i.e. Orkney and Shetland), and they consisted of the Hebrides, and of all the smaller western islands of Scotland, and Mann. At a later date his successors took the title of Rex Manniae et Insularum (King of Mann and of the Isles). The kingdom's capital was on St Patrick's Isle, where Peel Castle was built on the site of a Celtic monastery.
Olaf, Godred's son, exercised considerable power, and according to the Chronicle, maintained such close alliance with the kings of Ireland and Scotland that no one ventured to disturb the Isles during his time (1113–1152). In 1156, his son, Godred (reigned 1153–1158), who for a short period ruled over Dublin also, lost the smaller islands off the coast of Argyll as a result of a quarrel with Somerled (the ruler of Argyll). An independent sovereignty thus appeared between [clarification needed] the two divisions of his kingdom.
In the 1130s the Catholic Church sent a small mission to establish the first bishopric on the Isle of Man, and appointed Wimund as the first bishop. He soon afterwards embarked with a band of followers on a career of murder and looting throughout Scotland and the surrounding islands.
During the whole of the Scandinavian period, the Isles remained nominally under the suzerainty of the Kings of Norway, but the Norwegians only occasionally asserted it with any vigour. The first such king to assert control over the region was likely Magnus Barelegs, at the turn of the 12th century. It was not until Hakon Hakonarson's 1263 expedition that another king returned to the Isles.

Decline of Norse rule.
From the middle of the 12th century until 1217 the suzerainty had remained of a very shadowy character; Norway had become a prey to civil dissensions. But after that date it became a reality, and Norway consequently came into collision with the growing power of the kingdom of Scotland.
Early in the 13th century, when Ragnald (reigned 1187–1229) paid homage to King John of England (reigned 1199–1216), we hear for the first time of English intervention in the affairs of Mann. But a period of Scots domination would precede the establishment of full English control.
Finally, in 1261, Alexander III of Scotland sent envoys to Norway to negotiate for the cession of the isles, but their efforts led to no result. He therefore initiated a war, which ended in the indecisive Battle of Largs against the Norwegian fleet in 1263. However, the Norwegian king Haakon Haakonsson died the following winter, and this allowed King Alexander to bring the war to a successful conclusion. Magnus Olafsson, King of Mann and the Isles (reigned 1252–1265), who had campaigned on the Norwegian side, had to surrender all the islands over which he had ruled, except Mann, for which he did homage. Two years later Magnus died and in 1266 King Magnus VI of Norway ceded the islands, including Mann, to Scotland in the Treaty of Perth in consideration of the sum of 4,000 marks (known as merks in Scotland) and an annuity of 100 marks. But Scotland's rule over Mann did not become firmly established till 1275, when the Manx suffered defeat in the decisive Battle of Ronaldsway, near Castletown.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_o ... sle_of_Man
Isle of Man 1998 21p/75p sg 793/798 and ms 797, scott 771/775.

TRIESTE LAUNCH

Uruguay issued in 2016 a miniature sheet for the 100th Anniversary of the Naval Oceanographic Office. On the stamp of 20p is depict the Casona Antonio Lussich, the main building of SOHMA, in the border of the sheet, on the right the shield of SHOMA and on the left the hydrographic launch TRIESTE.
I got from Mr. Erhard Jung the following information on the TRIESTE.
Built as a hydrographic launch by the yard of Massimo Petronio, Trieste, Italy for the Uruguay Navy.
Displacement 13.6 ton, dim. 13.50 x 3.30 x 0,90m.(draught)
Powered by2 Volvo Penta TAMD 42 diesel engines, with KaMeWa K 25 Hydrojet thrusters, speed 16 knots.
Range 550 mile by a speed of 14 knots.
Crew 4
12 March 2001 commissioned at Montevideo.as TRIESTE.

The TRIESTE hydrographic launch is, together with the OYARVIDE (ROU 22), one of the two vessels of the Navy of Uruguay specifically built for the bathymetric survey in Uruguayan waters. The crew consists of trained personnel for navigation and maintenance, while the appropriate personnel in hydrography in which she operates (usually composed of an Official Hydrographer and between two to three crew members), embarks on the occasion of carrying out the works, coming from the Service of Oceanography, Hydrography and Meteorology of the Navy (SOHMA). Its base port is the Marina of Santa Lucía, in front of Santiago Vázquez.

Construction and incorporation
The TRIESTE was built on the Massimo Petronio shipyards, Trieste, in northern Italy, built to carry out bathymetric survey tasks in fluvial and coastal waters, with modern equipment and complying with the standards of the International Hydrographic Organization. (IHO).
On 13 March 2001, in the presence of the then President of the Republic , Dr. Jorge Batlle Ibañez , the President of Italy , Carlo Azeglio Ciampi , Commanders in Chief of the Armed Forces of both countries and various national and foreign authorities, the delivery ceremony of the Hydrographic vessel granted by the International Maritime Academy of Trieste took place in the Port of Montevideo , named TRIESTE in its honor of the building place, the Uruguay flag was already hoisted one day before.
The delivery of the vessel responded to the "Agreement of formation for the fluviomarítima security", signed by Uruguay with the European Union , being destined to the support of the tasks of the hydrographic ship OYARVIDE (ROU 22) in the layout of the denominated "Safe Water Lanes" that would connect the high seas with the ports in that area. Assuring the non-existence of obstacles of navigation. The width of the lanes is six nautical miles and will increase in some important sections.

Characteristics and capabilities
The TRIESTE belongs to Class 100 A / 1.1 NAV.S.ST, the same being the first construction in its series. Its propulsion is by means of two Hydrojet Motors, which avoids the presence of appendices in the submerged part of the ship, thus facilitating both the navigation in shallow waters and the launching and recovery operations at sea of the instruments; also significantly reduces vibrations on board, increasing comfort for the crew and long-levity equipment. In this way an excellent maritime capacity with optimum propulsive performance is ensured.
The ship is capable of operating in coastal waters, within twenty miles off the coast, with an range of 550 nautical miles at continuous cruising speed of 14 knots, with a maximum speed of 16 knots. The hull is subdivided into 5 watertight areas; the form of the living quarters derives from the experience acquired in the projects and in the construction of units for heavy uses, assuring to this type of unit remarkable operational advantages and high safety in navigation. In order to accommodate 4 crew members, it has a cabin with a U-shaped sofa that can be transformed into two bunks, plus two folding bunk beds. It also has a bathroom and a small kitchen.

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lancha_hi ... ca_Trieste
Uruguay 2016 20p sgMS?, scott?

Tristan - 500th anniversary of the discovery Part II.

30р-ТHОМАS SWAIN 1774-1862г-. see more viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16107. 30р-HMS «CHALLENGER»1873г-. see more viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7384. 30р-REVEREND DODGSON ARRIVES 1881г. Edwin Heron Dodgson (30 June 1846 – 3 January 1918), a clergyman in the Church of England, He is primarily remembered for his work as a missionary in the island of Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic Ocean, the most remote human settlement in.In 1880 he was appointed by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG) as missionary and school teacher to Tristan da Cunha. The schooner «Edward Vittery» was chartered at a cost of £35 to take Dodgson from St Helena to Tristan. He landed safely on 25 February 1881. Unfortunately a gale sprang up and the boat was driven ashore and wrecked at a spot later named in honour of the occasion as «Down-Where-The-Minister-Land-His-Things», as it still appears on maps of the island. All of Dodgson's books (except 100 copies of the Mission Hymn Book), the harmonium, and most of his stores were lost, but the communion vessels were saved, as was a stone font. 50р-WRECK OF THE «ITALIA» 1892г-. see more viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5715. 80p- NORWEGIAN EXPEDITION 1937–38. Erling Christophersen (April 17, 1898 – November 9, 1994) was a Norwegian botanist, geographer and diplomat. He participated in and led several notable scientific expeditions in the 20th century, including the fifth Tanager Expedition (1924) to Nihoa and Necker Island and the Norwegian Scientific Expedition to Tristan da Cunha (1937–1938).The Norwegian Scientific Expedition to Tristan Da Cunha was a scientific and cultural exploration of the most remote inhabited archipelago in the world, in the south Atlantic Ocean, 2,000 km (1,200 mi) from the nearest inhabited land, Saint Helena. The expedition arrived on the island in December 1937 and left in March 1938. Captained by botanist Erling Christophersen, the thirteen man crew included three University of Oslo Ph.D. students conducting research for their dissertations, which were published shortly after their return. Based on observations made during the voyage, Christophersen published «Tristan da Cunha», «the Lonely Isle» (1938) and the comprehensive «Norwegian Scientific Expedition to Tristan Da Cunha, 1937-1938» (1945). 50р-HMS «МILFORD» 1938г-. see more viewtopic.php?f=2&t=6774.
Tristan_da_Cunha 2006;30р;30р;30р;50р;80р;50р.МS. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erling_Christophersen, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_Dodgson, http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Norwegian_Sc ... _1937-1938.
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Neuralia

The full index of our ship stamp archive

Neuralia

Postby shipstamps » Mon Oct 20, 2008 5:21 pm

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SG212
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British India liner Neuralia, well-known for her many years of service to the nation as a troop transport. With her sister ship Nevasa, she was designed for the United Kingdom-Calcutta service of the British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd. and was launched by Barclay, Curle and Co. Ltd. on September 12, 1912.
A vessel of 9,082 gross tons (later increased to 9,182), she had a deadweight capacity of 9,920 tons on a draft of 28 ft. 4 ins. Her overall length was 500 ft. and she had a beam of 58 ft. and depth of 34 ft. There were three complete decks.
Two quadruple-expansion engines having cylinder dimensions of 231/4 ins., 33 ins., 47 ins, and 68 ins, in diameter and a stroke of 48 ins, drove twin screws and took steam at 215 lbs. per sq. in. from seven single-ended coal-fired cylindrical boilers. The machinery gave the ship a normal speed of 141/2 knots. Accommodation was provided for 128 first and 98 second-class passengers.
The Neuralia (her name was a shortened version of that borne by a hill station in Ceylon) had hardly time to settle down to regular service when the First World War began and she was requisitioned as a troopship. In June 1915 she was converted into a hospital ship and among the places she visited were Suvla Bay and Salonika during the Dardanelles campaign that year. After the armistice she was released and following a refit reverted to her normal commercial life once more, on the United Kingdom—India or East Africa services.
In 1925 the ship was converted into a permanent troopship for the British Government. For the next 14 years she carried out trooping voyages to many parts of the world, principally between Southampton and India, but also to and from Malta, Egypt and Singapore. Her normal peace time complement of troops was about 1,000 men. Although a transport, she remained under British India ownership and management and in the 1930s she initiated a scheme of carrying parties of schoolboys on cheap cruises to Scandinavian waters during the non-trooping seasons—an idea which may be regarded as the forerunner of the present British India educational cruises.
In 1940 the Neuralia was one of the ships in the second convoy carrying Australian troops which reached the Eastern Mediterranean in the late spring, shortly before Italy declared war. After disembarking the troops at Port Said, she sailed to Cyprus, returning with a full complement of Cypriots anxious to leave an island threatened with occupation. She next sailed from Port Said through the Straits of Gibraltar to Dakar where she embarked 2,000 French native troops and set course for the Bay of Biscay. On passage news was received of the fall of France and the vessel put back to Dakar, disembarked the troops and then sailed for Gibraltar.
There followed a period of carrying refugees, some of them to Jamaica. On returning from the last of these trips, the convoy in which the Neuralia was sailing was repeatedly attacked by U-boats over a period of several days.
When Japan declared war, the Neuralia was one of several British India ships employed in taking refugees from Rangoon. Two days after the city fell to the Japanese, she was lying at Madras when orders were received to proceed to Port Blair, in the Andaman Islands, and take off all who wished to leave. She set out across the Bay of Bengal escorted most of the way by a cruiser. Sailing unharmed through the Manners Strait, which had been mined, she passed the reefs outside the entrance to Port Blair and succeeded in entering the inner harbour, a feat never before performed by a vessel of her size. Taking on board all who wished to be evacuated, she sailed again a few hours later, at two o'clock in the morning, guided through the reefs by a launch showing a small light in her stern.
She spent 1943 partly in the Far East and partly in the Mediterranean, where, among other duties, she carried troops to Tripoli, Augusta, Taranto and Naples, and found herself at the end of April 1944 at Algiers. From this port she sailed for Glasgow and a quick refit and then proceeded to London, where she joined other ships preparing for the invasion of Normandy. On June 5, 1944, she passed down the river and at dawn next day was at her "battle station" opposite the "Omaha" and "Utah" beaches.
The Neuralia sailed back and forth between the beaches and Southampton until the following October, when she returned to London for a major overhaul. During the period she had made 14 trips and carried a total of 27,000 men of the Imperial and United States Armies. After Normandy she sailed, via the Azores, to Alexandria and then made three voyages to Greece, carrying Greek prisoners-of-war from Egypt. She also took Greek troops from Athens to various parts of Greece.
Then came her last mission. She was ordered to take some 1,700 Yugo-Slav refugees, who had been living in camps in the Canal Zone, back to their native country, now freed from German occupation. She set out for the port of Spalato, now called Split, on the Adriatic coast. Reaching there during the last week of April 1945, she landed her passengers and put to sea again for Taranto, where she was scheduled to take on board a full complement of German prisoners-of-war. She never arrived.
The vessel was coming round the heel of Italy, just turning into the Gulf of Taranto, on May 1, 1945, when at 02.00 hours she was shaken by a violent explosion. She had struck a mine which had exploded in the engine room, immediately flooding that vital space, and it seemed unlikely that she could survive for very long.
The order was given to abandon ship, but the Neuralia did not sink at once, remaining afloat until dawn, when she started to list to port. Soon she was on her beam ends and then started to sink by the stern, and as the after end of the ship disappeared from view, the forepart reared up out of the water and hung motionless for a few moments before it gradually slipped back out of sight among a froth of bubbles.
Thus sank the Neuralia a week before Germany's unconditional surrender. For more than 30 years she had been sailing the seas as a trooper and had served through two world wars.
SG212 Sea Breezes 7/67
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