SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TRIREME

The stamp shows in the background a “trireme” : viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12113&p=16176&hilit=trireme#!lightbox[gallery]/5/

The Bosnia& Herzegovina Post gives the following by the stamp, most is about the Iris and noting about the depicted vessel.

About Myths and Flora 2007 - The Illyrian Iris in Myths

Perunika (Iris) was named after Perun – Slavic God of Thunder. Legend says that perunika would overgrow in the place that was touched by Perun’s lightning.
Many species of Iris grows in Herzegovina and Dalmatia: Iris illyrica, iris croatica, and Iris pseudopallida. Many antiques writers, such as Teofrast, Nicander and Plinius, mention it.

The root of perunika was used in medicine and in agriculture, but its biggest value was in perfumery. According to the Plinius, the odour of perunika was produced only by Greek cities such as Corint, who led in perfume manufacturing and exported it all over the Mediterranean, and Kizik. Hereof testimony many ceramic pots for perfumes – alabastron and aryballos. In the first fase, the perfume was in liquidity, but Corinthians were started to produce fixed perfume (Greek stymma, something like today’s cream). It was more economical for transport and it was prepared for special pots – pikside.
Many pots for perfumes were found in the field of Narona where, in the IV. century B.C, Greeks founded emporium (port) and established market place in the Neretva, on which boats and ships triere – trireme, were sailing.

Plinius Secundus, in his encyclopedia Naturalis historis writes: “Iris laudatissima in Illyrico, et ibi quoque non in maritimis, sed in silvestribus Drilonis et Naronae”. (Perunika from Illyrica is very praised, not those along the shore, but those in the woods along Drim and Neretva).

Bosnia& Herzegovina 2007 3.00KM sg?, scott?

DEPORTATION OF THE PEOPLE OF ST PIERRE et MIQUELON in 1793

The stamp issued in 1993 by St Pierre et Miquelon shows the people leaving by most probably fishing boats St Pierre et Miquelon after the British captured the island on 14 May 1793 and the people living there were deported. In the background of the stamp, the island is visible, and the people in the first boat are looking for the last time to the island.

The people of the island were deported to Magdalen Island in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.

St Pierre et Miquelon 1993 5f10 sg 698. Scott 591.
Source: Internet

HMS Diana (1794)

HMS Diana was a 38-gun Artois-class fifth rate frigate of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1794. Because Diana served in the Royal Navy's Egyptian campaign between 8 March 1801 and 2 September, her officers and crew qualified for the clasp "Egypt" to the Naval General Service Medal that the Admiralty authorized in 1850 to all surviving claimants. Diana participated in an attack on a French frigate squadron anchored at Saint-Vaast-la-Hougue at the Action of 15 November 1810, which ultimately led to the destruction of the Elisa. (Boats from Diana went in and set fire to the beached Eliza despite heavy fire from shore batteries and three nearby armed brigs; the British suffered no casualties.) On 7 March 1815 Diana was sold to the Dutch navy for £36,796. On 27 August 1816 she was one of six Dutch frigates that participated in the bombardment of Algiers. Diana was destroyed in a fire on 16 January 1839 while in dry-dock at Willemsoord, Den Helder. The design stamp is made after painting of Tom Freeman.
Source:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Diana_(1794). Ivory Coast 2018;500f.

SOUTH AFRICAN PORTS

35c Walvis Bay Harbour:
This bay is on the west coast of South Africa was marked on Portuguese marine charts as early as 1487. The natural harbour was named Golfo de Santa Maria da Conceicao by Bartolomeu Dias. The Territory of Walvis Bay became a British possession in 1878, and in 1884 it was incorporated into the then Cape Colony.
Walvis Bay was formerly a whaling station. Originally the bay was too shallow for use by Ocean Steamers but it has systemically dredged and the first quay for passengers and cargo vessels was opened in 1927. Walvis Bay is the centre of the important fishing industry on the west coast and also handles the exporting of minerals from Namibia.

55c East London:
East London port is situated in the mouth of the Buffalo River. In 1835 the river was surveyed for a possible harbour for longboats to carry passengers and cargo from the ships on the road to and from the harbour but it came to noting.
1847 A new attempt was made to open a port and this was also not successful.
Only when there where diamonds found in Grqualand there came sufficient money free to start again. In 1872 the first shipments with equipment arrived and after setting up a platform for the cranes the construction was started of the south breakwater.
1875 The first wharf was constructed, 1876 another and in 1877 a third wharf.
1993 The harbour has now 2.6km of quay, and several railway lines connect the port with Transvaal and other regions. The turnover in that year appr. 3 million tons and 26,000 containers a year.
In the foreground is a white hulled cargo vessel visible, most probably a reefer vessel.

70c Port Elizabeth: On 12 March 1488 Bartolomeu Dias became the first recorded Occidental to call at Bahia de Lagos as he named the bay now known as Algoa Bay. As a seaport, however, the town of Port Elizabeth owns it origin to the British settlers of 1820. After their arrival, the need for a customs post arose. In 1825 the bay was given port status with the appointment of a port master, and a year later a collector was appointed. Today, Port Elizabeth is the fifth largest cargo-handling port in South Africa. The port has more as 3,400m of quayage and a container terminal with two berths. Recently a large container-handling terminal for imported motor vehicle components was developed.

90c Cape Town Harbour: Table Bay has been used as a landing place by passing ships ever since Bartolemeu Dias rounded the Cape of Good Hope in 1488. The port grew from the refreshment station founded by Jan van Riebeeck in April 1652 for ships of the Dutch East India Company. In 1656 work was started on a wooden jetty to facilitate the landing of small boats. During World War II, Cape Town handled more than 400 convoys, saw 13,000 ships repaired, and took in about 6 million soldiers. During the Suez crises in 1973, the port handled an enormous amount of shipping. Today (1993) Cape Town handled some 4.5 million of cargo annually. There are sophisticated container handling facilities as well as two dry-docks and extensive service facilities.

Durban Harbour: In 1823 the brig SALISBURY viewtopic.php?f=2&t=10957&p=11622&hilit=salisbury#p11622 sheltered in a bay on the Natal coast during a sudden storm. Impressed by the potential of the bay, Lieutenants King and Farewell obtained a concession for a trading store on the waterfront. Thus began the history of South Africa’s busiest port. Today over 500.000 containers are handled at the container terminal annually, the largest in Africa. A large passenger terminal also provides for the needs of ocean travellers.

Source: South Africa Post and internet.
South Africa 1993 35c/R1.05 sg 772/76, scott 844/48

The Battle of “Soleil Royal” and “Britannia” in 1692

The scene in this painting depicts Soleil Royal and Britannia exchanging fire during the Battle of Barfleur in 1692. Lead by Adm. Tourvilles and sorely outnumbered, the French fleet, purportedly under order from King Louis XIV, attacked the Allied fleet, which consisted of Dutch and British ships. The battle was fierce, and in the end, the French, overwhelmed, were forced to flee, splitting into two groups. Soleil Royal, the flagship of Adm. Tourvilles, along with eleven other French ships were pressed by the Allied fleet and driven ashore at Cape La Hougue. The Allied fleet brought up their fire ships and destroyed Soleil Royal along with the other eleven French ships in the surf off la Hougue. The remainder of the French fleet, caught in the famous tidal race of Alderney, were swept to the west where they took refuge in various creeks, some driven ashore. The design stamp is made after painting of James A Flood.

Source:http://www.jamesaflood.com/soleil.html Ivory Coast 2018;2170f.

KEBIR CLASS PATROL BOAT

For the 20th Anniversary of the Algerian Coast Guard service, Algeria issued one stamp which shows a patrol boat of the Coast Guard at that time.

In 1993 only one type was in use, the Kebir-class which were replaced in 1994 by a Chinese type patrol boat.

The first three were built in the U.K. the others in Algeria. The first was built in 1982 the last in?
Displacement 250 tons, dim. 37.5 x 6.86 x 1.78m.
Powered by two diesel engines, 6,000 bhp., twin shafts, speed 27 knots.
Armament 1 – 25mm AA gun and 2 – 14.5mm MG.
Crew 27.
So far I can find 6 were in the service of the Coast Guard, the others by the Algerian Navy.

Source: Internet various sites.
Algeria 1993 2.00D sg 1123, scott?
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THORSHAMMER whale factory vessel

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THORSHAMMER whale factory vessel

Postby aukepalmhof » Fri Nov 27, 2009 8:05 pm

tmp1E9.jpg
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thorshamr.jpg
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Tristan da Cunha issued a set of stamps for the 50th Anniversary of the Norwegian Scientific Expedition to the island in 1937.
One of the largest sponsors of the expedition was Lars Christensen, the owner of the whale-factory vessel THORSHAMMER.
The expedition travel south in whale-factory vessels, and during their stay the expedition was able to describe rare species of fauna, and new species of plants and grasses with links to adjacent continents.
Five scientific volumes, several books, and numerous papers resulted from these studies.

After four months on the island, 12 members of the expedition were taken back to Norway in the whale-factory vessel THORSHAMMER.

Built as a tanker under yard No 459 by W.Doxford & Sons, Sunderland, U.K. for Eagle Oil Transport Co. Ltd., London.
09 June 1914 launched under the name SAN NAZARIO.
Tonnage 10.064 gross, dim. 525.5 x 66.5 x 41.4ft.
Triple expansion Doxford 4-cyl steam engine 795 nhp., speed 11 knots.
September 1914 delivered to owners.

At that time she was the largest tanker in the world.

23 July 1928 bought by A/S Bryde & Dahl’s Hvalfangerselkap (Lars Christensen) Sandefjord, Norway and converted in a whale factory vessel.
Tonnage 12.215 gross, 7.147 net, 16.050 dwt. Dim. 535.0 x 66.5 x 41.5ft
Renamed in THORSHAMMER.
1931/32 Further rebuilt in Rotterdam. Then managed by A/S Thor Dahl.

When in January 1941 the German surface raider PINGUIN (HK33) surprised the Norwegian whaling fleet in the Antarctic, only the THORSHAMMER under command of Capt. Einar Torp, and her seven chatchers escaped to Grytviken, South Georgia.

Whaling was later resumed but under guard of the British armed merchant cruiser QUEEN OF BERMUDA and CARNAVON CASTLE.
11 April 1941 she sailed to New Orleans to discharge her valuable whale oil.
Then she made an other whaling voyage to South America west coast off Peru in the fall of 1941, but when Japan entered the Second World War, whaling was suspended during the rest of the war.
The THORSHAMMER was the rest of the war used as a tanker.

After the war again refitted in a whale-factory vessel by Framnæs Mekaniske Verksted in 1948, and Harland & Wolff at Liverpool in 1949.
1952 Sold to Thor Dahls Hvalfanger A/S, Sandefjord, Norway.
1963 Bought by Cant. Nav. Santa Maria, La Spezia, Italy, she arriver there on 06 September 1962 for scrapping.

Tristan da Cunha 1987 50p sg437, scott?

Source: Register of Merchant Ships completed in1914. Watercraft Philately Vol. 35 page 16.
http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleett2.html Pesca, A History of the Pioneer Modern Whaling Company in the Antarctic by Ian B. Hart.
Last edited by aukepalmhof on Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: THORSHAMMER whale factory vessel

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:04 pm

2017 norwegian expedition.jpg
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This four stamps don’t show a ship, but the THORSHAMMER who picked the expedition members up from Tristan da Cunha is on a stamp.

Norwegian Tristan Expedition 1937-1938

Anne Vaalund, Museum of University History, University of Oslo

The expedition was led by the botanist Erling Christophersen. In the spring 1933 the Botanical Museum of the University of Oslo received a parcel of botanical samples collected on Gough Island. They were collected by the whaling ship-owner Lars Christensen in just a few hours, but despite this, the collection contained 12 species new to this island, and three previously undiscovered species. Christophersen was intrigued with Tristan da Cunha, and started to plan an expedition.
Earlier scientific expeditions to these islands had stayed for less than a week, whereas this lasted for four months, from December to March. This was the whaling season in the Antarctic summer. The whaling industry was important in Norway and essential for the expedition. The botanist Christophersen contacted Christensen for funding and support, and he was more than willing to help. His whale factory ships could transport the expedition to the island at the start of the season and pick up the crew on the way back to Norway.
The expedition had 13 participants and could hardly have been more multi-disciplinary with: botanist, algologist, land zoologist, marine zoologist, geologist and a surveyor. But this was not only meant to be a science expedition. In 1937 there were 188 Tristanians on the island who were to be studied by a physician, a dentist and a sociologist.
The expedition members arrived onshore 7 December, 1937. They brought with them equipment weighing 100 tonnes, including building materials for the research stations. They were given a warm welcome and were installed in the parish hall until the expedition station was erected.
The dentist and the physician had their field lab inside the expedition station. On the 35p stamp the physician Henriksen and the medical assistant Oeding are photographed while doing lab work. The man in the background is the sociologist P.A. Munch. He, of course, had no need for a lab. He visited the Tristanians in their homes and observed them in their work to study the society.
The dentist Sognnæs had his field lab and a dentist chair with all equipment next to this lab. He was intrigued by the good dental health in the population. He wanted teeth for his lab research and the deal he offered was a chocolate bar for a tooth!
The goal of the expedition was to collect everything of interest. To do this, one needed to map the terrain. The 70p stamp shows surveyor Crawford at work. He started out mapping the coastline and worked towards the centre of the island. Later, official maps were made based on his surveys. The geologist Dunne analysed the volcanic islands, asking questions like when were they formed and how has the climate shaped them over time.

The £1 stamp shows Tristanians lined up on a bench outside the field station where they were tested for tuberculosis by the physician Henriksen. The population wasn’t just known for their good dental health, but also for their good health in general. Henriksen joined the expedition to try to understand why they were so healthy.
The biologists did fieldwork around the island, and from boats around the coast. In addition to the main island, they did fieldwork at the islands Inaccessible and Nightingale. To get to these islands they had hired the Norwegian adventurer Erling Tambs with his Norwegian Spitzgatter RS SANDEFJORD. The islands are populated with many birds. The land zoologist Hagen led the work of ring marking two thousand Great Shearwaters (Puffinus gravis). Some of them were later found outside Newfoundland and in Norway. They also found a Tristan thrush (Nesocichla eremita) which was considered extinct. On the £1.50 stamp from Nightingale the marine biologists Baardseth and Sivertsen are watching Hagen together with a Northern rockhopper penguin. They are sitting outside their simple field lab, with walls of tussocks grass.
On 29 March the whaling factory THORSHAMMER arrived. The field station and most of the remaining equipment was given to the Tristanians. A small gift compared to all the help the expedition had received during the months on Tristan da Cunha. Back home in Norway the expedition members analysed their research materials and in the following years published more than 50 scientific papers from this expedition to Tristan da Cunha.
Expedition members:
Erling Christophersen (Botanist and leader), Egil Baardseth (Algeologist), Allan B. Crawford (Surveyor from England), J.C. Dunne (Geologist from South Africa), Ragnar Eggesvik (Radio Operator), Yngvar Hagen (Land Zoologist), Sverre Dick Henriksen (Physician), Yngvar Mejland (Botanical Assistant), Peter A. Munch (Sociologist), Per Oeding (Medical Assistant), Erling Sivertsen (Marine Zoologist), Severin Skjelten (Handyman), Reidar Sognnæs (Dentist)

Technical details:-
Photographs courtesy of Museum of University History, University of Oslo
Printer: Cartor Security Printing
Process: Lithography
Perforation: 13 ½ x 13 ¼ per 2 cms
Stamp size: 28 x 42mm
Sheet Layout: 10
Release date: 7 December, 2017
Production Co-ordination: Creative Direction (Worldwide) Ltd

Source: http://www.pobjoystamps.com/contents/en ... -1938.html
Tristan da Cunha 2017 35p/£1.50 sg?, scott?
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