SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

TRAKAI CASTLE BRIDGE

For the Europa issues, Litauen issued two stamps in 2018 of 0.75 Euro, by the stamp with the Trakai Castle Bridge the Litauen Post gives.

Trakai Castle Bridge - a pedestrian bridge on Lake Galvė leading to one of the larger islands - Castle Island in Trakai. The bridge connecting the city with the castle consists of two parts, among which the Karaim or Cowan Island.

There are some medieval type vessels depict in the foreground of which I think by looking to the rigging that the small vessel on the left of the stamp is a “kurenas” see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8754
On the right of the stamp two ships of the “maasilinn” type are depict see: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=14743

Litauen 2018 0.75 Euro sg?, scott?

MAIL TRANSPORT PORTUGAL

For the 25 Anniversary van het Ministry of Transport in 1973 Portugal issued three stamps which shows us mail transports, on the 6$00 stamp which shows us a stylized vessel which looks like a ro-ro vessel. Have not any info on the ship.

Portugal 1973 6e00 sg?, scott?

MERIDIANAS

Litauen issued in 2018 two Europa stamps which shows us bridges of that country both are 0.75 Euro.
The stamp which shows us a stamp with a bridge in Klaipeda, is the Birzos Bridge, in the background is a cruise vessel of which I have not any information, the light tower is the rear leading light tower of the port.
In front of the bridge is a tall ship, which is the MERIDIANAS homeported in Klaipeda and used as a floating restaurant vessel in 2018.

Built as a wooden hulled training ship under yard No 5 by Oy Laivateollisuus Ab shipyard in Turkey, Finland for the Ministry of Fisheries in Moscow.
22 February 1947 laid down.
10 June 1948 launched as the MERIDIAN, two sisters the SEKSTANT and TROPIK.
Tonnage 322 brt, 41 nrt, 55 dwt., dim. 39.40 x 8.90 x 3.40m. (draught)
Powered with an auxiliary 2-stroke diesel engine, speed with engine 6.5 knots.
Barquentine rigged.
30 August 1948 completed.
01 October 1948 delivered to the Soviet Union.

After Finland signed a peace treaty with the Soviet Union on 19 September 1944 Finland agreed war reparations under which building of vessels for the Soviet Union, one of this vessels was the MERIDIAN.
03 May 1949 the Maritime School of Klaipeda receives the training vessel, her name was then MERIDIANAS.
1954 She joins the Baltic training fleet, thereafter she was used for training voyages with trainees from Kaliningrad, Riga and Klaipeda maritime schools.
1968 In the aftermath of an accident MERIDIANAS is deleted from the list of active training ships and moved to Klaipeda.
1970 She is handed over to the Public Trust of Eateries, Restaurants and Cafés of Klaipeda.
1971 A restaurant was opened on board of the MERIDIANAS.
1994 Was she privatised.
2001 For a token of 1 Litas she was sold, and a support fund was founded for the sailing ship MERIDIANAS, a symbol of the maritime city Klaipeda, which took over the management of the ship.
Early October 2012 the then head of the Fund applies to the Government of Litauen for a permit to sink the MERIDIANAS in the territorial waters of Litauen. The reason not any money is available for the repair and restauration of the vessel.
19 October 2012 the ship was handed over to Aloyzas Kuzmarskis and Aidas Kaveckis with intention to overhaul and repair the barquentine, she was moved to the Western Shipyard (AB Klasipédos laivu remontas AB) where she docked on 10 November 2012, and repair work on her hull commenced.
09 November 2013 after repaired and restoration she was moved to her permanent location at the embankment of the Dane River behind the Birzos Bridge.
19 July 2014 her sail were hoisted again for the first time after the restoration, and she is handed back to the city of Klaipeda.
18 December 2014 management is taken over by Friedrich pazazas.
2018 She is still in Klaipeda and a restaurant and bar are operating on board.

Source: http://www.restoranasmeridianas.lt/en/h ... ackground/ and internet.
Litauen 2018 0.75 Euro sg?, scott?

HAMINA-CLASS fast attack craft

This Finish stamp shows us one of the Hamina-class fast attack craft, the stamp shows not a pennant no, that one of this class of four ships is depict.

All four were built by Aker Finnyard in Rauma, Finland for the Finnish Navy.
Displacement 250 tons, dim. 51 x 8.5 x 1.7m. (draught).
Powered by two MTU 16V 538 TB93 diesel engines 5,520 kW, two Rolls Royce Kamewa 90SII waterjets. Speed over 30 knots., range 500 mile.
Armament: 1 – Bofors 57mm/70 SAK Mk3, 2 – 12.7mm M.G. 8 Umkhonto-IR SAM (Denel), 4 – RRS-15 Mk2 SSM (Saab), 1 rail for depth charges or mines (sea mine 2000)
Crew 26.

The Hamina-class missile boat is a class of fast attack craft of the Finnish Navy. They are classified as "missile fast attack craft" or ohjusvene, literally "missile boat" in Finnish.
History
The vessels were built in the late 1990s, early 2000s, and are the fourth generation of Finnish missile craft. The first vessel was ordered in December 1996 and the fourth was handed over on 19 June 2006. Since the launch of the Helsinki-class missile boats, all fast attack craft have been named after Finnish coastal cities. The class was previously known also as Rauma 2000 following its predecessor the Rauma class.
The four vessels form what the Finnish Navy calls Squadron 2000 (Finnish: Laivue 2000). Initially the Finnish Navy considered several different compositions for the new squadron, and at one point only two Hamina-class vessels and four Tuuli-class ACV were to have been built. After a strategic shift of the Finnish Navy's role, the composition of the Squadron 2000 followed suit. The Tuuli-class prototype was never fully equipped, nor fitted for operational use and its three sisters were cancelled, instead two more Hamina-class boats have been built; with some of the equipment intended for the Tuulis being used in the Haminas. The fourth and final Hamina-class vessel was delivered in summer 2006.
The squadron reached its full operational capability in 2008 and have greatly improved the surface- and air surveillance as well as air defense capability of the Finnish Navy. Their electronic surveillance suite also increases the quality of information available to military leaders.
All ships were built at Aker Finnyards in Rauma, Finland. The vessels have their home base at Upinniemi.
In March 2014 it was announced that the Hamina-class missile boats will be upgraded in the near future.
MLU (Mid-Life Update
In January 2018, it was announced that the vessels will be equipped initially With Torped 45 and later with Torped 47 torpedoes. It was also announced that new Bofors 40mm Mk.4 guns had been selected as part of the MLU upgrade.
In February it was announced that Finland intended to buy RGM-84Q-4 Harpoon Block II missiles for the Haminas.
Design
The vessel's hull is constructed of aluminum and the superstructures are constructed of re-enforced carbon fiber composite. The vessels have a very low displacement and are very maneuverable. They are equipped with water jets instead of propellers, which allow them to operate in very shallow waters and accelerate, slow down and turn in unconventional ways.
The Hamina class are very potent vessels, boasting surveillance and firepower capacities which are usually found in ships twice the size.
Stealth technology
The Hamina class has been designed and constructed as stealth ships with minimal magnetic, heat and radar signatures.
The shape of the vessel has been designed to reduce radar signature. Metal parts have been covered with radar absorbent material, and the composite parts have radar absorbent material embedded in the structure. Radar transparent materials have been used where applicable.
Unlike glass fiber, carbon fiber blocks radio waves. This protects ship's electronics against electromagnetic pulse. In addition, it stops any radio frequency signals generated by ships electronic devices escaping outside. Except for the bridge, the vessel has no windows that would allow the signals to escape.
The vessel contains hardly any steel parts, thus generating very low magnetic field. The remaining magnetic field is actively canceled with electromagnets.
Exhaust gases can be directed underwater to minimize thermal signature, or up in the air to minimize sound in submarines direction. 50 nozzles around the decks and upper structures can be used to spray seawater on the vessel to cool it. In addition, the nozzles can be used to clean the ship after chemical attack or radioactive fall-out.
Weapons
The Hamina class have the latest in surveillance and weapons technology all integrated into an intelligent command system. A Hamina class vessel can monitor about 200 kilometres (120 mi) of air space and its Umkhonto surface-to-air missile system can simultaneously engage a maximum of eight aircraft, up to 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) away, while the vessel's anti-ship missiles have a range in excess of over 250 kilometres (160 mi).
The Hamina class' primary weaponry is four RBS-15 Mk.3 anti-ship missiles. The vessels are further equipped with a Bofors 57 mm gun against surface and aerial targets as well as the Umkhonto-IR surface-to-air missiles, MASS decoy system and two 12.7 mm heavy machine guns. It is also possible to use the ships for mine-laying.
The software of the centralized combat control system is COTS oriented, built on top of Linux running on redundant x86 rack servers, which makes maintenance and future updates and optimizations simpler.
In early 2018, Finland announced the mid-life upgrade program, which will equip all four boats in the class with new Swedish lightweight anti-submarine warfare torpedoes in the years 2023-2025 and extend the life of the boats to 2035

Vessels
FNS HAMINA
Pennant number: 80
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: December 1996
Commissioned: 24 August 1998
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service.
FNS TORNIO
Pennant number: 81
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 15 February 2001
Commissioned: 12 May 2003
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service
FNS HANKO
Pennant number: 82
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 3 December 2003
Commissioned: 22 June 2005
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service
FNS PORI
Pennant number: 83
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 15 February 2005
Commissioned: 19 June 2006
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamina-class_missile_boat

Finland 2018 sg?, scott

VÄINÄMÕINEN or ILMARINEN

The Finish navy did have two coastal defence ships before World War II and one of this is depict on this stamp. The submarine in the foreground is the VESIKKO see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16336

Both were built on the Ab Crichton-Vulcan Oy in Turkey for the Finish Navy.
The VÄINÄMÕINEN was ordered in 1927 the ILMARINEN in1929.
29 April 1932 launched as the VÄINÄMÕINEN.
Displacement 3,900 ton, dim. 93.0 x 16.8 x 5.0m. (draught)
Powered diesel electric by four Krupp engines each 1,173 hp each,two shafts,speed 14.5 knots.

Range 700 mile by 14.5 knots.

Armament: 2 – 254 mm Bofors, 4 – 105mm Bofors, 4 – 40mm Vickers and 2 – 20mm Madsens when built, four 20mm Madsens added in 1944.
Crew 410.
28 December 1932 commissioned.

VÄINÄMÕINEN was a Finnish coastal defence ship, the sister ship of the Finnish Navy's flagship ILMARINEN and also the first ship of her class. She was built at the Crichton-Vulcan shipyard in Turku and was launched in 1932. Following the end of the Continuation War, VÄINÄMÕINEN was handed over to the Soviet Union as war reparations and renamed Vyborg.[i] The ship remained in Soviet hands until her scrapping in 1966.
Design
VÄINÄMÕINEN and ILMARINEN were planned to be mobile coastal fortresses for the defence of the Finnish demilitarized islands at Åland in particular. The two ships were not well suited for the open seas due to a design with emphasis on operations in the shallow waters of the archipelago: it has been said that they were volatile and rolled too much. The minimal depth keel, together with the high conning tower, made the ships' movements slow and wide. It was said that the ships were uncomfortable, but harmless to their crews.
The ship's heavy armament of 254-millimetre (10 in) Bofors guns could fire shells of 255 kilograms (562 lb) up to 31 kilometres (19 mi).
Fire control
In fire control, the two coastal ships were identical. The fire control centre and the gun towers were connected electrically so that ranging and orders could be given without spoken contact. With the aid of mechanical calculators, the values were transferred directly to the gun towers.
Operational history
Winter War
During the Winter War, the two coastal defence ships were transferred to the Åland islands to protect against invasion. When the ice cover started to become too thick in December, the ships were transferred to Turku, where their anti-aircraft artillery aided in the defence of the city.
Continuation War
The only time VÄINÄMÕINEN and ILMARINEN fired their heavy artillery against an enemy was at the beginning of the Continuation War, during the Soviet Red Army evacuation of their base at the Hanko Peninsula. VÄINÄMÕINEN also participated in the distraction manoeuvre Operation Nordwind on 13 September 1941, during the course of which her sister ship ILMARINEN was lost to mines.
In 1943 "Detachment VÄINÄMÕINEN", which consisted of VÄINÄMÕINEN, six VMV patrol boats and six motor minesweepers, was moved east to take positions along the coast between Helsinki and Kotka. She did not actively participate in many operations, since the heavier Soviet naval units never left Leningrad, where they were used as floating batteries during the siege. As a result, VÄINÄMÕINEN's primary operational duties were to patrol the Gulf of Finland between the minefields "Seeigel" and "Nashorn", as well as protection of the German-Finnish anti-submarine net across the gulf.
During the Soviet assault in the summer of 1944, the Soviets put much effort into trying to find and sink VÄINÄMÕINEN. Reconnaissance efforts revealed a large warship anchored in Kotka harbour and the Soviets launched an air attack of 132 bombers and fighters. However the target was not VÄINÄMÕINEN — instead it was the German anti-aircraft cruiser NIOBE .
Postwar
After the end of the Continuation War VÄINÄMÕINEN was handed over as war reparations to the Soviet Union. The ship was handed over on 29 May 1947 to the Soviet Baltic Fleet, where she was renamed VYBORG. The ship served over 6 years in the Red Fleet at the Soviet base in Porkkala, Finland. The ship was called Vanya (a Russian short form of the name Ivan) by the sailors of the Baltic Fleet.
VYBORG was modernized during the 1950s and served for a while as an accommodation ship in Tallinn. Preparations to scrap the ship were begun in 1958. During this time, there were talks to return the ship to Finland. The ship was, however, scrapped in 1966 at a Leningrad scrapyard. According to Soviet calculations, 2,700 tons of metal were recovered.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V%C3%A4in ... fence_ship

The ILMARINEN was also ordered in September 1929.
09 July 1932 laid down.
09 September 1933 launched as ILMARINEN.
She has the same details as her sister.
17 April 1934 completed.

ILMARINEN was a Finnish Navy Panssarilaiva ("Armored ship"; a coastal defence ship by British classification). The unit was constructed at the Crichton-Vulcan shipyard in Turku, Finland, and named after the mythological hero ILMARINEN from the Finnish national epic, the Kalevala. ILMARINEN was the flagship of the Navy from 1 May 1933 until her demise on 13 September 1941.
During the early inter-war period the Finnish Navy consisted of some 30 ex-Russian vessels, most of them taken as war-trophies following the civil war. Never ideal types for the navy's needs, they were generally old and in poor condition. In 1925, a tragic incident highlighted the sorry state of the navy. An old torpedo boat was lost in a fierce storm, taking with her the entire crew of 53. A heated debate started, and intensive lobbying led to the adoption of a new Finnish Navy Act in 1927.
Prior to World War II, the fleet renewal program led to the acquisition or construction of five submarines, four torpedo boats, and two coastal defense ships. Among the last of their kind, VÄINNÄNÖINEN and ILMARINEN were two of the most concentrated naval artillery units ever built. They were designed by the Dutch company NV Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (a front for German interests circumventing the Treaty of Versailles), and were optimized for operations in the archipelagos of the Baltic Sea. Their open sea performance was de-emphasized in order to give the vessels their shallow draft and super-compact design.
Coastal defence ships were particularly popular in the Nordic countries, and began serving in the navies of Denmark, Sweden and Norway early in the 20th century. These vessels typically had heavy armament and good armor protection, but were relatively slow. Their sizes were around 4,000 tons, main armament consisted of guns between 210 and 240 mm (8 and 9 in), the armor corresponded to that of armoured cruisers, and speeds were between 15 and 18 knots (28 and 33 km/h; 17 and 21 mph). A coastal defence ship was somewhere between a cruiser and a monitor: slower than a cruiser but better armed, faster than a monitor, but with smaller guns. The coastal defence ships also varied among themselves; some of them were closer to cruisers, and others, such as the Finnish ones, were closer to monitors.
Being the second of her class, ILMARINEN was launched at the Turku shipyard on 9 September 1933. The ship went through its finishing trials and was handed over to the Finnish Navy on 17 April 1934. Her sister ship Väinämöinen had preceded her by two years.
The vessels had a compact design, with a high mast and large turrets for main and secondary artillery. Foreign comments on their design ranged from puns to praise. Not truly designed for open sea operations, the ships had a tendency to roll slowly and widely even in moderate seas. Travel on them was unpleasant, but deemed safe. Additional keels were later fitted, which improved the situation...

HSU FU bamboo raft

Ancient Chinese texts tell the story of Hsu Fu, a navigator and explorer sent by the first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, in 218 BC into the "Eastern Ocean" in search of life-prolonging drugs. Hsu Fu completed the voyage on a bamboo raft, which some believe took him to America and back.

Tim Severin set out to prove that such a voyage really could have been made. On the beach at Sam Son, Vietnam, he oversaw the construction of a 60-foot (18.3 m) long, 15-foot (4.6 m) wide raft built of 220 bamboos and rattan cording, and driven by an 800 square foot (74 square metre), junk-rigged sail. After leaving Asia in May 1993, Severin and his crew faced monsoons, pirates, and typhoons before the rattan began rotting and the raft began falling apart in the mid-Pacific. After travelling 5,500 miles (8,850 km) in 105 days, they were forced to abandon the raft about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) short of their destination.

Although the Hsu Fu, as the craft was named, did not complete the trip, Severin believed the voyage had accomplished its purpose. In The China Voyage, published in 1994, he wrote that the expedition had proved that a bamboo raft of the second century BC could, indeed, have made a voyage across the Pacific, just as Hsu Fu's account recorded.

More on the voyage you can find on: http://www.personal.psu.edu/pjc12/From% ... dition.htm

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Sever ... oyage_(May–November_1993)
Surinam 2018 SRD 19.00 sg?, scott?
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NELSON - A study of his life, by Ted Evans, Liverpool.

NELSON - A study of his life, by Ted Evans, Liverpool.

Postby john sefton » Fri May 15, 2009 6:11 pm

Nevis 2.jpg
(1) Captain Maurice Suckling.
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Nevis 1.jpg
(2) Admiral Sir William Cornwallis.
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Portrait.jpg
(3) First portrait of Nelson as an 18 year old.
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Ascension 1.jpg
(3a) From the portrait by Rigaud.
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Tristan da Cunha 1.jpg
(4) Portrait by John Hoppner.
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Gibraltar 4.jpg
(5) Lemuel Francis Abbot portrait.
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Nauru 1.jpg
(6) Portrait by Sir William Beechey.
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Trafalgar 2.jpg
(7) "The Nelson Touch" Wm Marshall painting.
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Barbados 1.jpg
(8) Nelson's statue Barbados SG274
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SG147.jpg
(8a) Nelson's statue Barbados SG147
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St Helena 2.jpg
(9) Specially commissioned portrait.
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trafalgar.jpg
(10)Lord Howe on his Flagship Queen Charlotte
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Solomon Is 6.jpg
(11) Nelson loses the sight of his eye.
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(12)Agamemnon, Captain, Vanguard, Elephant and Victory.
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San Jose.jpg
(13) San Jose 112 guns.
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San Nicolas.jpg
(14) San Nicolas 80 guns.
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Solomon Is 1.jpg
(15) Battle of Cape St Vincent.
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Nelson San Nicolas.jpg
(16) Lord Nelson boarding the San Nicolas.
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(17) Nelson being taken back to HMS Theseus
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SG843.jpg
(18) Battle of the Nile.
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(19) HMS Goliath destroying Guerrier.
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Orient.jpg
(20) French Flagship L'ORIENT exploding
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(20a) Battle of the Nile. SG226
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(20b) HMS Orion
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(21) Celebrating after victory-Battle of the Nile
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(22) Nelson's Dispatches.
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(23) Battle of Copenhagen
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(24) Battle of Copenhagen, 1801.
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(24a) HMS Dictator and HMSEdgar
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(25) Nelson and Trafalgar
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(26) Trafalgar
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(27)Death of Nelson
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(28)Death of Nelson
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(29)Nelson's body preserved in a cask of brandy.
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(30) Monument, Liverpool.
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(31) Nelson's Sword
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Lord Horatio Nelson was born a son of the Rector of Burnham Thorpe in Norfolk, on 29th September 1758.(Michaelmas Day)
HORATIO NELSON is generally regarded as the greatest officer in the history of the Royal Navy. His reputation is based on a series of remarkable victories culminating in the Battle of Trafalgar where he was killed in his moment of triumph, when he utterly defeated the Combined French and Spanish Battle Fleet.
The poet Lord Byron referred to him as " Britannia's God of War".
NELSON joined the Navy aged 12 in 1770, he experienced sailing in the West Indies, the North West Passage when only 14,and in the North Sea. He was promoted post Captain at the age of 20. His first command was the Frigate HMS HINCHINBROOK, a 6th rate 28 guns she was the French ASTREE captured in 1779 and re-named.
He was charged later with taking young Prince William [the future King William 1V.] to the West Indies in HMS ALBERMARLE, another 6th rate 28 guns captured from the French. She was named by them MENAGERE.
These appointments coming his way by virtue of his uncle Captain Maurice Suckling (1), Comptroller of the Navy and MP for Portsmouth no less. In the West Indies he shared lodgings with William Cornwallis (2), later Admiral Cornwallis. These two men who had an early influence on Nelson are shown on the two stamps from Nevis.
Nelson appears on many stamps that are copied from painted portraits. According to Lord Vincent, Nelson sat for "every painter in London".The first portrait as an eighteen year old Lieutenant by John Francis Rigaud was begun in 1777 and completed in 1780 . It shows Nelson in post captain's uniform with the fortress ofSan Juan Nicaragua in the background (3). This was used on the 40p Ascension Island stamp (3a).
A portrait by John Hoppner was used for the 50p Tristan da Cunha stamp (4). Nelson was bitterly disappointed that he could not add a medal for the Battle of Copenhagen to the medals he had for the Battles of St Vincent and the Nile. The Admiralty did not consider that the battle should be commemorated with a medal.
The portrait by Lemuel Francis Abbot, used for the 47p Gibraltar stamp (5) shows Nelson wearing his foreign decorations including the chelengk, given to him by the sultan of Turkey, in his hat.
The $2.50 stamp of Nauru is from a portrait of Nelson by Sir William Beechey in London in 1800.(6)
The Grenada mini-sheet of the 200th Anniversary of Battle of Trafalgar shows Nelson, Napoleon Boneparte, HMS Victory and, from a painting by William Marshall - "Nelson's Band of Brothers", but more correctly "Nelson explaining his plans for the Battle to his captains".(7)
Barbados issued a stamp in 1950 showing Nelson's statue. SG274.(8)
For the Trafalgar 200 celebrations, a special portrait of Nelson was commissioned and used for many countries including Jamaica, Nauru, Solomon Islands, St Helena, Kiribati and others. (9)
Nevis issued a min-sheet (10) for Trafalgar 200 showing the Mather Brown painting of Lord Howe on his Flagship QUEEN CHARLOTTE - Glorious First of June Battle. Nelson described Howe as "our great master in naval tactics and bravery". Above the stamp is the 1780 portrait of Nelson by Rigaud and also a portrait of Admiral Lord Hawke. Nelson favoured the tactics of Hawke who was adept at chasing and breaking enemy lines in seemingly impetuous and unformed attacks.
Apart from HMS Hinchinbrook and HMS Albermarle previously mentioned,Nelson was given command of HMS Agamemnon,(see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8860) a 3rd rate 64, in 1793 when he was assigned to the Mediterranean. It was there that he took part in the capture of Corsica in 1794. While directing naval guns from siege works outside the town of Calvi, he was hit in the face by a shower of gravel resulting from a near miss and he was blinded in his right eye.(11)
In 1797 he was in HMS Captain (see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8862 ) at the Battle of Cape St Vincent.
In 1798 he was in HMS Vanguard (see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7792&p=7788#p7788) at the Battle of the Nile.
In 1801 he was in HMS Elephant (see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8863) at the Battle of Copenhagen.
In 1805 his Flagship at Trafalgar was HMS Victory. (see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=8865)
All of the above four ships are shown on the $10 issue from Liberia taken from a painting in 1908 by Nicolas Pocock.(12)
Nelson was in charge of HMS Boreas (see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7361&p=7357&hilit=boreas#p7357) for three years in the West Indies between 1784 and 1787. She was a 6th rate 28 guns built by Blaydes and Hodgson of Hull. In service august 1774, 636 tons L125ft B34ft. When she was paid off Nelson was ashore for 5 years before being given command of HMS Agamemnon.
On 10th December 1796, Commodore Nelson flew his broad pennant aboard HMS La Minerve and, under orders from Admiral Jervis sailed for the Mediterranean with HMS Blanche to complete the evacuation of Corsica and the garrison at Elba. (see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=7794 )
NELSON'S ACTIONS AND NAVAL ENGAGEMENTS.

In February 1797 NELSON was a Commodore, his Flagship HMS CAPTAIN. In the Fleet of Admiral Sir John Jervis whose Flagship was HMS VICTORY. On the 14th February 1797 the Battle of St Vincent was fought against a much larger Spanish Fleet, Jervis' Fleet had 15 x ships of the line 1 x 3rd rate 64, 4 x Frigates 1 x Brig and a Cutter. The Spanish Fleet had 27 x ships of the line , 10 x Frigates, and a Brig. In addition 6 of the Spanish Ships had more than 112 guns.
SANTISSIMA TRINIDAD had 136 guns on 4 decks. Jervis saw that the Spanish Fleet was straggled out with a gap of about 7 miles between the leading 6 ships and the remaining 21 . He took his ships and drove them into the gap between the two Spanish Divisions attacking the Leeward Division. Nelson in CAPTAIN without instruction or signal wore out of line and attacked the Spanish Weather Division. In doing so he he offered his ship as target to seven enemy ships including the SANTISSIMA TRINIDAD .
Nelson was followed by Collingwood in HMS EXCELLENT, Troubridge in CULLODEN and Frederick in BLENHEIM. Nelson placed the rather battered CAPTAIN onto the SAN NICOLAS 80 guns, she then collided with the the SAN JOSEF 112 guns. (13)
Nelson led CAPTAIN's crew boarding and captured the SAN NICOLAS (14). Edward Berry who was an observer on CAPTAIN in rank himself a Commander, took down the Spanish ensign. Then using the fact that the SAN NICOLAS was entangled with the SAN JOSEF they went onto that vessel and captured her as well. The use of an 80 gun ship to attack a 112 gun ship became known as "NELSON's Patent Bridge for Boarding 1st Rates" (15)(16). That was at a cost, as a quarter of the British Casualties at St Vincent were on HMS CAPTAIN.
Four Spanish Ships were captured the rest were battered but escaped. Jervis was criticised for not pursuing he Spanish Fleet, but he was made Earl Vincent, Nelson received a Knighthood and promoted Rear Admiral.

Later in 1797 NELSON was Rear Admiral and had as his Flagship HMS THESEUS during a disastrous attempt to capture a Spanish Treasure Ship and the port of Santa Cruz in Tenerife. The attack was repulsed by the garrison being vigilant and ready for action.
The British had been misinformed that the garrison would quickly surrender.
Nelson sustained injuries during the attack that resulted in him being returned to the THESEUS, where he had his right arm amputated on 24th July 1797. (17)

NELSON - BATTLE OF THE NILE (18)
In August 1798 Lord Horatio NELSON was in his Flagship HMS VANGUARD. The BATTLE OF THE NILE was acknowledged as one of his greatest achievements. Following chase criss-crossing the Mediterranean, Nelson became aware that the French had taken Malta .
He surmised that the French were bound for Egypt, and he headed there arriving before the French fleet. Believing then that the French were about to invade Turkey, Nelson headed North. In doing so he passed the French who were on route for Alexandria. On being told that the French had landed there, Nelson returned and found the French Fleet anchored in Aboukir Bay in a seemingly impregnable position.
Nelson had briefed his Captains that he was going to attack immediately. Captain Foley in HMS GOLIATH 74 (19)saw that the French were anchored and swinging freely on their bow anchors. He believed that there was room on the landward side of the French ships.
Foley, without hesitation, crossed the bows of the French GUERRIER Delivering a murderous raking fire from the landward side where he anchored GOLIATH. The French ship's guns were manned and pointing seawards. In fact stores and bedding were stacked on the Indward side of the ship's decks.
HMS CULLODEN followed GOLIATH, but she ran aground on a sand bank, then the British Ships, ZEALOUS, AUDACIOUS, THESEUS and ORION, using CULLODEN as a buoy and passed clear and followed GOLIATH.
These ships attacked the French ships from the landward side. The remaining British ships then attacked from the seaward side. The French Flagship L'ORIENT 120 guns, under fire from different directions burst into flames and blew up at 10.pm. (20)The explosion damaged several nearby ships.
The French then struck their colours. But 4 x French ships, under Admiral Villeneave – GUILLAUME TELL 80, GENEREUX 74, DIANE 74 and JUSTICE 44 escaped . British losses were 600 men, the French lost 6,250. (21)
The following ships were captured and taken into the Royal Navy. AQUILON 74, CONQUERANT 74, FRANKLYN 80, PEUPLE SOVEREIGN 74, SPARTIATE 74 and TONNANT 80.
GUERRIER, HEUREUX, MERCURE and TIMOLON, all 74's, were burnt.
BRITISH ORDER OF BATTLE
Ship Guns Men Captain
Alexander 74 590 Alexander Ball
Audacious 74 590 Davidge Gould
Bellerophon 74 590 Henry d"Esterre Darby
Culloden 74 590 Thomas Troubridge
Defence 74 590 John Payton
Goliath 74 590 Thomas Foley
Leander 50 343 Thomas Thornoson
Majestic 74 59 George Westoott
Minotaur 74 595 Thomas Louis
Mutine 16 120 Thomas Hardy
Orion 74 590 Sir James Saumarez
Swiftsure 74 590 Benjamin Hallowell
Theseus 74 590 Ralph Miller
Vanguard, 74 640 Edward Berry*
Admiral Horatio Nelson
Zealous 74 590 Samuel Hood

LETTERS AND DESPATCHES (22)
TO ADMIRAL THE EARL OF ST. VINCENT, KB., COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF.
Vanguard, off the Mouth of the Nile, 3rd August, 1798.
My Lord,
Almighty God has blessed his Majesty's Arms in the late Battle, by a great Victory over the Fleet of the Enemy, who I attacked at sunset on the 1st of August, off the Mouth of the Nile. The Enemy were moored in a strong Line of Battle for defending the entrance of the Bay, (of Shoals,) flanked by numerous Gun-boats, four Frigates, and a Battery of Guns and Mortars on an Island in their Van; but nothing could withstand the Squadron your Lordship did me the honour to place under my command. Their high state of discipline is well known to you, and with the judgment of the Captains, together with their valour, and that of the Officers and Men of every description, it was absolutely irresistible. Could anything from my pen add to the character of the Captains, I would write it with pleasure, but that is impossible.
I have to regret the loss of Captain Westcott of the Majestic, who was killed early in the Action; but the Ship was continued to be so well fought by her First Lieutenant, Mr. Cuthbert, that I have given him an order to command her till your Lordship's pleasure is known.
The Ships of the Enemy, all but their two rear Ships, are nearly dismasted: and those two, with two Frigates, I am sorry to say, made their escape; nor was it, I assure you, in my power to prevent them. Captain Hood most handsomely endeavoured to do it, but I had no Ship in a condition to support the Zealous, and I was obliged to call her in.
The support and assistance I have received from Captain Berry cannot be sufficiently expressed. I was wounded in the head, and obliged to be carried off the deck; but the service suffered no loss by that event Captain Berry was fully equal to the important service then going on, and to him I must beg leave to refer you for every information relative to this Victory. He will present you with the Flag of the Second in Command, that of the Commander-in-Chief being burnt in L'Orient.
I have the honour to be, my Lord, your Lordship's most obedient Servant, HORATIO NELSON.

NELSON-BATTLE OF COPENHAGEN (23)(24)
When Denmark refused to leaved the Armed Neutrality of the North Coalition the Royal Navy moved to deprive the French of the Danish Fleet.
The Danes had 18 ships in Copenhagen Harbour protected by a 66 gun battery and a wide area of shoals that made navigation difficult
The British had 26 Line of Battle ships, seven Frigates and a number of smaller craft.
When talks between the two parties failed the Brtish Commander, Sir Hyde Parker moved in his Deputy Vice Admiral Lord NELSON into battle with the Danes.
Nelson in HMS ELEPHANT with eleven warships went around the shoals preparing to make his attack. Several key warships ran aground, BELLONA, and RUSSELL after they had tacked round the Middle Ground, whilst AGAMEMNON was stranded from the start.
Then a floating battery meant to fire on the land batteries of the Danes, ran aground..
The following action was bloody with many casualties.
For three hours heavy gunfire was exchanged between ships and shore batteries. Three ships were sent in to replace the three that had run aground, they being VETERAN, RAMILLIES and DEFENCE , they made slow painful progress. Then Parker hoisted the infamous signal 39 - " DISCONTINUE THE ACTION". Nelson, whatever he may have said or whichever eye he put his telescope to ignored the signal.
So in fact did every other ship in the fleet apart from a few frigates and smaller ships not involved in the firing since it was a general order, which every ship was supposed to obey directly, whatever their intermediate commander may have done.
Withdrawal would in any case have been suicidal. The Danes would not have ceased firing and taking men from the guns to make sail would have left the Ships virtually defenceless.
Before the fleet withdrew the Danish guns had to be silenced. Nelson's ELEPHANT continued to fly the signal "ENGAGE MORE CLOSELY". The fleet obeying his signal.
By about 2pm many of the Danish defences were out of action, the bombardment slowed down, so Nelson sent a flag of truce suggesting an end to the hostilities. This came about at 3.15pm. after nearly six hours of continuous gunfire. The British had 1000 men killed or wounded, but the Danes had 2,000 casualties and over 2,000 taken prisoner. 12 ships were taken as prizes.
Nelson's legend continued to grow. Everybody knows that he died at Trafalgar and that he put his telescope to his blind eye at Copenhagen. Hyde Parker was ruined. He left negotiations to Nelson and eventually an Armistice was declared.
Hyde Parker was ordered home and the Admiralty had him strike his flag. He was never employed again. Nelson was in overall command. He went to Russia and obtained the release of impounded British merchantmen. Handing over command to Vice Admiral Pole he returned home in HMS KITE, a Brig.
BATTLE of COPENHAGEN Line of Battle (24)
Elephant 74 Vice Admiral Lord Nelson Captain Thomas Foley
Defiance 74 Rear Admiral Graves Captain Richard Retalick
Edgar 74 Captain George Murray
Monarch 74 Captain James Mosse
Bellona 74 Captain Sir Thomas Thompson
Ganges 74 Captain Thomas Fremantle
Russell 74 Captain William Cumming Agamemnon 74 Captain Robert Fancourt
Ardent 64 Captain Thomas Bertie Polyphemus 64 Captain John Lawford
Glatton 54 Captain William Bligh
Isis 50 Captain James Walker
Amazon 38 Captain Edward Riou
Dibsirke 36 Captain Henry Inman
Blanche 36 Captain Graham Hammond
Alcmene 32 Captain Graham Hammond
Jamaica 26 Captain Jonas Rose
Arrow 30 Captain William Bolton
Dart 30 Captain John Devonshire
Cruiser 18 Commander James Brisbane
Harpy 16 Commander William Birchall

Bomb Vessels
Discovery 16 Commander John Conn
Explosion 8 Commander John Martin Heda 10 Commander Richard Hatherill Sulphur 10 Commander Hender Whiner
Terror 8 Commander Samuel Rowley Volcano 8 Commander James Watson
Zebra 16 Commander Edward Clay
Fire vessels
Otter 14 Commander George McKinley
Zephyr 14 Commander Clotworthy Upton

BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR (written up elsewhere) (25)(26)(28)(29)
Following the battle at about 4.00pm 21st October 1805, Captain Hardy told Nelson that he had a complete victory, in that at least 15 enemy ships had been captured. Nelson replied "That is good but I had bargained for twenty".
He ordered that the fleet should anchor, but this was not complied with. He told Hardy that he was near death and requested that he be not thrown overboard.
He said "Take care of poor Lady Hamilton"
Then - "KISS ME HARDY" (27)

LIVERPOOL-NELSON MONUMENT(30)
The monument is surmounted by the Apotheosis. Consisting of a roughly pyramidal group of five figures. These figures are entangled in the voluminous drapes of four large "captured" flags. The flag poles are set at different angles. An anchor and rope lie around the base. An idealised nude Lord Nelson, his right foot on a cannon and his left foot on a corpse of a conquered enemy, raises in his left hand a sword upon which Victory personified is putting a fourth crown to indicating his fourth Naval victory — Trafalgar. She is also lowering one of the flags to conceal Nelson's missing right arm. To the right of Nelson, half hidden by the lowered flag, is the skeleton depicting Death reaching out to touch him indicating that he died at the moment of victory. A lance wielding British seaman, although the lance is now missing, seemingly is attacking Death with the intention of avenging Nelson. Behind Nelson, the fifth figure BRITANNIA is kneeling with bowed head lamenting his death. She wears a Greek helmet and her right hand slung over her shield holds a laurel wreath and Nelson's decorations. One medal bears the inscription. NILE / First Aug / 1798.

NELSON'S SWORD (31)
A gold mounted presentation ceremonial sword with gilt decoration to the blade, etched with presentation inscription as follows
"THE SUBSCIBERS TO A FUND FOR ERECTING A MONUMENT
IN LIVERPOOL TO THE IMORTAL MEMORY OF THE LATE
Rt.HON.ADMIRAL LORD NELSON WITH EVERY SENTIMENT
OF THE GRATITUDE TO HIS GALLANT SUCCESSOR THE Rt.
HON. ADMIRAL LORD COLLINGWOOD FOR HIS HEROIC
CONDUCT IN THE EVER TO BE REMEMBERED NAVAL
ENGAGEMENT AT TRAFALGAR, PRESENT TO HIS LORDSHIP
THIS SWORD, EMBLEMATICALLY REPRESENTING THE
GLORIOUS VICTORY OVER THE COMBINED FLEET OF
FRANCE AND SPAIN IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD MDCCCV'
This sword was to be presented by Liverpool Corporation to honour and commemorate Admiral Nelson as "Victor of the battle of the Nile". After Nelson's unexpected death at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, his second in command, Admiral Lord Collingwood accepted the invitation to receive the sword. However, he was refused leave from the Navy and died before he was able to visit Liverpool. The sword remains in Liverpool Town Hall today because .....
The sword was subsequently presented to Charles Utting, Lord Mayor 1918 "For his gallant war effort"
john sefton
 
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