SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

ALMADA NEGREIROS MURAL

José de Almada Negreiros was commissioned by architect Porfírio Pardal Monteiro to create large murals for two new Lisbon maritime stations: Gare Marítima de Alcântara (mural completed in 1945) and Gare Marítima da Rocha Conde de Óbidos (mural completed in 1948). The multi-paneled murals give insights into art and visual characterization during the New State. Comparing the two projects, as Ellen W. Sapega’s book Consensus and Debate in Salazar’s Portugal discusses, reveals differences in visual interpretation under highly regulated official policy towards the arts.
http://visualizingportugal.com/murals-b ... negreiros/

One of this murals is depict on a stamp issued by Portugal in 1993, it shows some steam trawlers in the foreground, of which one carried the name TOJO, in the background are more vessel depict under sails. Have not any information on the vessels depict.

The Mural you can see in the Gare Maritime de Alcantara in Lisbon. More on the artist is given by Wikipedia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9 ... _Negreiros
Portugal 1993 65e sg2317, scott ?

PACIFIC EXPLORER

SEVEN SEAS MARINER

Norfolk Island has issued two stamps and a MS which depict cruise vessel who has visited the island.
One of this vessels is the SEVEN SEAS MARINER.

17 January 2000 laid down.
Built as a cruise vessel under yard No K31 by Chantiers de L’Atlantique, St Nazaire, France for the Prestige Cruise Service (Europe) Ltd. and managed by Radison Seven Seas Cruises, Mata Utu, Wallis & Futuna.
08-September 2000 launched as the SEVEN SEAS MARINER.
Tonnage 48,075 grt, 17,600 net, 4,700 dwt. Dim. 216.0 x 28.84 x 16.15m., length bpp. 187.00, draught 7.20m.
Powered diesel electric by 4 Wärtsilä 12V 38B 12-cyl. diesel engines, 16,600 kW, connected to two Roll Royce Mermaid pods, each 8.5 MW, which power 2 Azimuth pods. Speed 19.5 knots.
Accommodation for 769 passengers maximum. Crew 445.
08 March 2001 delivered to owners.
22 May 2001 christened in Los Angeles.

From May 2001 engaged in cruises around the world.
June 2008 sold to Oceania Cruises Inc., Nassau, Bahamas.
May 2009 management transferred to Prestige Cruise Service.
October 2010 sold to Mariner LLC, Miami, USA, and registered under Bahama flag with homeport Nassau.
October 2015 Management transferred to NCL, Bahamas Ltd.
2018 Same name and owners. IMO No 9210139.

Norfolk Island 2018 $1 sg?, scott?

DIA DE LA ARMADA

Mexico issued in 1992 one stamp for the Dia de la Armada (Dag van de Navy) which shows us two stylized warships.

The sailing ship is as it looks topsail schooner rigged, while the vessel in the foreground with the long afterdeck is a modern warship.

Mexico 1992 $1.300 sg 2101, scott 1779.

TRIREME

The stamp shows in the background a “trireme” : viewtopic.php?f=2&t=12113&p=16176&hilit=trireme#!lightbox[gallery]/5/

The Bosnia& Herzegovina Post gives the following by the stamp, most is about the Iris and noting about the depicted vessel.

About Myths and Flora 2007 - The Illyrian Iris in Myths

Perunika (Iris) was named after Perun – Slavic God of Thunder. Legend says that perunika would overgrow in the place that was touched by Perun’s lightning.
Many species of Iris grows in Herzegovina and Dalmatia: Iris illyrica, iris croatica, and Iris pseudopallida. Many antiques writers, such as Teofrast, Nicander and Plinius, mention it.

The root of perunika was used in medicine and in agriculture, but its biggest value was in perfumery. According to the Plinius, the odour of perunika was produced only by Greek cities such as Corint, who led in perfume manufacturing and exported it all over the Mediterranean, and Kizik. Hereof testimony many ceramic pots for perfumes – alabastron and aryballos. In the first fase, the perfume was in liquidity, but Corinthians were started to produce fixed perfume (Greek stymma, something like today’s cream). It was more economical for transport and it was prepared for special pots – pikside.
Many pots for perfumes were found in the field of Narona where, in the IV. century B.C, Greeks founded emporium (port) and established market place in the Neretva, on which boats and ships triere – trireme, were sailing.

Plinius Secundus, in his encyclopedia Naturalis historis writes: “Iris laudatissima in Illyrico, et ibi quoque non in maritimis, sed in silvestribus Drilonis et Naronae”. (Perunika from Illyrica is very praised, not those along the shore, but those in the woods along Drim and Neretva).

Bosnia& Herzegovina 2007 3.00KM sg?, scott?

DEPORTATION OF THE PEOPLE OF ST PIERRE et MIQUELON in 1793

The stamp issued in 1993 by St Pierre et Miquelon shows the people leaving by most probably fishing boats St Pierre et Miquelon after the British captured the island on 14 May 1793 and the people living there were deported. In the background of the stamp, the island is visible, and the people in the first boat are looking for the last time to the island.

The people of the island were deported to Magdalen Island in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.

St Pierre et Miquelon 1993 5f10 sg 698. Scott 591.
Source: Internet
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

QUEEN ELIZABETH HMS (R 08)

The full index of our ship stamp archive

QUEEN ELIZABETH HMS (R 08)

Postby D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen » Thu Jun 21, 2018 8:07 pm

queen elizebeth 2.png
Click image to view full size
HMS_Queen-Elizabeth-Arrives-Portsmouth-1014x487.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built in 2009-2017 by Aircraft Carrier Alliance, Rosyth Yard, Five, for the Royal Navy, ordered on 20-05-2008, laid down on 07-07-2009, launched on 17-07-2014, completed on 07-12-2017.
Aircraft Carrier, displacement:65,000 tons, L:284m. B:39m. over the waterline, maximum 73m. height:56m. draft:11m. 2 Rolls-Royce MT30 gasturbines:48,000 hp. (36 MW.) 4-16 cyl. Wärtsilä 38 diesels each:15,600 hp. 4 Converteam electric engines each:27,000 hp. (20 MW.) 2 shafts, 29 kn. radius:8000-10,000 nm. complement:679 and 250 marines, armament:3 Phalanx CIWS 20 mm. guns, 4-30 mm. cannons, several small canons and GPMG's, 36 F-35 Lightning II aircrafts en 4 helicopters.
At the end of June 2017 she left for her first sea trial, in 2020 she will be fully operational.

HMS Queen Elizabeth is the lead ship of the Queen Elizabeth class of aircraft carriers, the largest warships ever built for the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom and capable of carrying up to 60 aircraft. She is named in honour of the first Queen Elizabeth, a renowned World War I era super-dreadnought, which in turn was named after Queen Elizabeth I. The new Queen Elizabeth will carry her namesake's honours, as well as her Tudor rose-adorned crest and motto.

The ship began sea trials in June 2017 and was commissioned on 7 December 2017. Her first Commanding Officer is Commodore Jerry Kyd, who had previously commanded the carriers HMS Ark Royal and HMS Illustrious. As Captain of HMS Queen Elizabeth, Kyd will wear the Royal Navy rank of Captain while retaining the substantive rank of Commodore.

Queen Elizabeth has no catapults or arrestor wires and is instead designed to operate V/STOL aircraft; the air wing will typically consist of F-35B Lightning II multirole fighters and Merlin helicopters for airborne early warning and anti-submarine warfare. The design emphasises flexibility, with accommodation for 250 Royal Marines and the ability to support them with attack helicopters and large troop transports such as Chinooks. She is the second Royal Navy vessel to bear the name Queen Elizabeth and is based at HMNB Portsmouth.

On 25 July 2007, the then Defence Secretary Des Browne, announced the order for two new carriers. At the time of approval the first carrier was expected to enter service in July 2015 and the budget was £4.085b for two ships. The financial crisis led to a political decision in December 2008 to slow production, delaying Queen Elizabeth until May 2016. This added £1.560b to the cost. By March 2010 the budget was estimated at £5.900b and in November 2013 the contract was renegotiated with a budget of £6,200m. The in-service date was further extended to 2020 in the Strategic Defence and Security Review in October 2010.

Construction of Queen Elizabeth began in 2009. The assembly took place in the Firth of Forth at Rosyth Dockyard from nine blocks built in six UK shipyards: BAE Systems Surface Ships in Glasgow, Babcock at Appledore, Babcock at Rosyth, A&P Tyne in Hebburn, BAE at Portsmouth and Cammell Laird (flight decks) at Birkenhead. Two of the lower main blocks, together weighing more than 6,000 tonnes and forming part of the base of the ship, were assembled and joined into one piece on 30 June 2011. On 16 August 2011, the 8,000-tonne Lower Block 03 of Queen Elizabeth left BAE Systems Surface Ships' Govan shipyard in Glasgow on a large ocean-going barge. Travelling 600 miles (970 km) around the northern coast of Scotland, the block arrived at Rosyth on the evening of 20 August 2011. On 28 October 2012, an 11,000-tonne section of the carrier began a lengthy journey around the south coast of England, avoiding bad weather from the shipbuilding hall at Govan to the Rosyth dockyard; it arrived on 21 November. The forward island was constructed at BAE Portsmouth and attached on 14 March 2013; the aft island was attached in June 2013. The ski jump was added in November 2013, leaving just the elevators and radar to be lifted into place. By September 2013 Queen Elizabeth was 80% complete internally. A journalist reported that computers on the vessel appeared to be using Windows XP, which had raised concerns about its vulnerability to a cyberattack, but the source of the confusion was later revealed to be a laptop in use by a contractor.

She is two and a half times the size of the Invincible-class, and has the ability to carry approximately three times as many aircraft. Despite this, Queen Elizabeth has marginally fewer crew than the Invincible-class. She is approximately three times as large as HMS Ocean. The ship has two superstructures, or islands, one for navigation and ship's operations and the other for flight control and aerial operations. The islands can take on each other's function in an emergency.

The two ships of the Queen Elizabeth class are each expected to be capable of carrying forty aircraft, a maximum of thirty-six F-35s and four helicopters. The 2010 SDSR anticipated the routine peacetime deployment of twelve F-35Bs, but a typical warload will be 24 F-35Bs and some helicopters. These could be a Maritime Force Protection package of nine anti-submarine Merlin HM2 and five Merlin Crowsnest for airborne early warning; alternatively a Littoral Manoeuvre package could include a mix of Royal Navy Commando Helicopter Force Merlin HC4, Wildcat AH1, RAF Chinooks, and Army Air Corps Apaches. As of September 2013 six landing spots are planned, but the deck could be marked out for the operation of ten medium helicopters at once, allowing the lift of a company of 250 troops. The hangars are designed for CH-47 Chinook operations without blade folding and for the V-22 Osprey tiltrotor, whilst the aircraft lifts can accommodate two Chinooks with unfolded blades.

The two ships of the Queen Elizabeth class will each carry four passenger transfer boats (PTBs) made by Blyth-based company Alnmaritec. Each PTB carries 36 passengers and two crew to operate the vessel. The first boat named is named Swordfish, after the World War II-era aircraft of that name. The boat is 13.1 m long and davit-launched. To enable the craft to fit into the docking area the navigation and radar masts are fitted with Linak actuators so that they can be lowered automatically from the command console. The enclosed cabin is heated and there is a set of heads forward. The second of the four PTBs is named Buccaneer after the Blackburn Buccaneer, and the third is Sea Vixen, named after the De Havilland Sea Vixen.

Defensive weapons include the Phalanx Close-In Weapons System for anti-aircraft and anti-missile defence, and 30mm Automated Small Calibre Guns and Miniguns for use against fast attack craft. She would be escorted into high risk areas by the Type 45 Destroyer, which was made specially to fulfil this role. In lower risk situations, frigates or even patrol vessels may be used instead.

Incorporated into the first two blocks is a sophisticated handling and deployment system for air weapons, with the aim of achieving a sortie generation rate which is about six times faster than any previous Royal Navy aircraft carrier. The system requires only 50 people and could be operated with as few as 12 in an emergency; it is estimated that 160 would be needed to produce the same efficiency with conventional equipment. The system moves munitions on pallets by means of remotely controlled electric vehicles and lifts.

(Gibraltar 2018, £3, StG.?)
Internet
D. v. Nieuwenhuijzen
 
Posts: 775
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:46 pm

Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot] and 43 guests

cron