The “TARANAKI”- New Zealand trader

The full index of our ship stamp archive
Post Reply
Anatol
Posts: 810
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 2:13 pm

The “TARANAKI”- New Zealand trader

Post by Anatol » Wed Oct 06, 2021 5:29 pm

The TARANAKI was one of the New Zealand traders belonging to the Shaw Savill & Albion Company. She was a beautiful little emigrant clipper and one of the fastest. The firm mentioned above was one of the first to realize the growing business with freight and passenger service to New Zealand. Mr. Savill was originally a clerk in the early fifties who realized the potential of trading with the new colonies forming in New Zealand. He obtained a partner in Mr. Shaw, who had some experience with the shipping business in a counting-house, and the firm was born.
It is surprising how small the emigrant clippers were for the New Zealand trade as compared to the huge liners that were employed everywhere else. Right up to the last, few passenger or cargo ships which exceeded 1,500 tons were built for the trade, and most of these were very much smaller ships. The English, Scottish and Irish settlers who colonized the two beautiful islands at the Antipodes were very hardy and able to bear the sometimes very rough passage to their new home.
The TARANAKI was launched in January, 1877. Her registered measurements were: gross tonnage, 1,199; net tonnage, 1,126; length, 228 feet 2 inches; breadth, 35 feet 2 inches; depth, 20 feet 9 inches; she had a poop 41 feet long, and a fo’c’sle of 37 feet. She was built by the famous Scottish shipbuilder Robert Duncan, who did not know how to build a slow ship.
On her first three voyages, TARANAKI was commanded by Captain Wight. On her first outward passage, leaving port on May 2nd, 1877, she reached Dunedin on July 24th, 83 days out. One her second passage out she made the best time of her career. She left Glasgow with 326 passengers on November 7th, 1878 and reached Port Chalmers on January 24th, 75 days out. In 1879 Captain Wight went out in 81 days.
In 1880 Captain W. Hird took over the command of the beautiful little clipper and had her for the next four voyages, his best being 80 days to Lyttelton in the autumn of 1882. In October, 1884, Captain Gordon took over the command. Captain Gordon has the distinction of being the only captain to have an outward passage of over 100 days. He did have an excellent passage of 78 days out in 1887-88. Captain Gordon sailed the TARANAKI for 10 voyages, then turned over command to Captain J.A. Evans in 1894. Evans had the ship until 1902, his best passage being 80 days from London to Rimaru in 1900. The old ship was then sold to F. Olivari, of Genoa, for 2,900 pounds. She continued to sail the seas under her old name until 1915, when she was broken up at Genoa, though she was stilled classed 100 A1 at Lloyd’s. Throughout her long life, which included 24 voyages in the New Zealand trade, TARANAKI had the rare distinction of keeping clear of any kind of trouble. Her best chance for trouble turned out to be one of her best performances. In 1898 there was terrific weather in the Southern Ocean. TARANAKI arrived at Port Chalmers 93 days from Gravesend, which was the best passage of the season. She was a beautiful little clipper ship that served her owners faithfully and well her entire life. A better epitaph for a ship cannot be stated.
The design stamp is made after painting of Jack Spurling.
Mozambique 2020;(6x16,0) MT.
Sources: http://shipmodelersassociation.org/research/fam9901.htm. http://www.spurlingandrouxwatercolours.com/mpnzt.html.
Attachments
Clipper TARRANAKI.jpg
Clipper TARRANAKI.jpg (98.07 KiB) Viewed 66 times
taranaki.jpg
taranaki.jpg (193.53 KiB) Viewed 66 times

Post Reply