Discovery (Scott)

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shipstamps
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Discovery (Scott)

Post by shipstamps » Wed Aug 20, 2008 4:29 pm

A famous old ship is the subject of the 6d stamp design, of the new definitive issue for the Falkland Islands Dependencies. She is The Discovery, built for Capt. Scott's first attempt to reach the South Pole in 1901, was the first vessel built in Great Britain specially for Antarctic research work and cost £51,000. The money was raised by a joint appeal of the Royal Society and Royal Geographical Society for funds to defray the cost. The Discovery was built in 1901 by the Dundee Shipbuilding Company, and engined by Gourlay Brothers of Dundee. She is a wooden vessel, of 736 gross tons on dimensions
179.3ft. x 34ft. x 18.5ft. and is named after Hudson's ship (1602). Cook's ship (third voyage) and Vancouver's ship. The Discovery left for the Antarctic in 1901 and was marooned there for two winters, returning home in 1904. She was bought in 1905 by the Hudson's Bay Company. In the early part of the First World War she brought pro¬visions from Canada to France, and in 1910 was sent to the rescue of Shackletons men left on Elephant Island.

In 1923 the vessel was purchased from the Hudson's Bay Company by the Discovery Committee and was fitted out as an oceanic survey vessel. She sailed on a 2 year commission in 1925, on a voyage devoted to the study of the habits of whales. After her return in 1926 it was intended to recommission her for further voyages (she had been refitted at a cost of £90,000) and in 1927 she was sent out for an expedition organised by the Discovery Committee. In 1929 she was taken over by the British, Australian and New Zealand Research Expedition under Sir Douglas Mawson. She returned in 1931, alter, discovering large tracts of land including Princess Elizabeth Land, and then spent a number of years laid up in the East India Dock, London.
On October 11 1937, the late Duke of Kent. as Commodore of the Sea Scouts, received Capt. Scott's famous ship on behalf of the Boy Scouts Association from the Legislative Council of the Falkland Islands. She was then permanently moored at Temple Steps, Victoria Embankment, London. To enable them to accept this gift as a fitting memorial to Capt. Scott, as a headquarters for the Sea Scouts and training ship, Lady Housten and the Pilgrim Trust provided an endowment fund of £30,000 for the ship's maintenance. In December 1951, the old masts which sailed South with Scott 40 years previously were replaced, having been attacked by dry rot. A Canadian timber firm made a present of a new set.

Sea Breezes April 1954. Falk Dep SG G33

Sir Douglas Mawson 1882-1958

The 2008 stamp shows Discovery hove-to in calm waters to allow the expedition's float plane, a de Havilland Gipsy Moth, to be prepared for an exploratory flight over the nearby Antarctic continent. Expeditions: British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 in Nimrod; Australian Antarctic Expediton: 1911-1914 in Aurora. British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expeditions 1929-30 and 1930-31 using Discovery. Discoveries: South Magnetic Pole 1908, Mac-Robertson Land, Banzare Coast .
Attachments
SG G33
SG G33
Discovery.jpg
Discovery.jpg
Discovery Scott.jpg
SG51
SG51
SG241
SG241
SG46
SG46

aukepalmhof
Posts: 7151
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

Re: Discovery

Post by aukepalmhof » Thu Jun 11, 2009 9:31 pm

80p - Discovery in Winter Quarters
Discovery was used as the expedition base throughout the expedition. She was anchored in a natural harbour off Hut Point and allowed to be trapped in the ice as the sea froze around her. Her fires were drawn and her boilers drained. As she had limited storage and workroom capacity, a large storage hut and two smaller scientific facilities were erected ashore. During the two years, the ice around her became nearly 5 metres thick.

The design shows Discovery amid snow drifts with a number of kennels for the Siberian huskies. The snow's wind-driven dynamo provided electric lighting until it became irreparably damaged during an early winter blizzard. Beyond may be seen the slopes of Observation Hill.

Life on the ship during the winter months was a well-ordered routine of work. Officers and men had their own seperate quarters. Concerts, talks, musical shows and card games helped provide recreation and stimulus. In the ship's wardroom, temperatures rose as high as 25°C whilst outside they plummeted to below -40°C. Ernest Shackleton edited a monthly journal, the South Polar Times, from an office in the hold of the ship.

The 5p stamp features Stanley Kemp and the Discovery Expeditions vessel DISCOVERY. Concern that whaling in the Southern Ocean was becoming unsustainable led to the Discovery Investigations, a pioneering long-term scientific programme to study whale biology and the oceanography and ecology of the Southern Ocean. Stanley Kemp was appointed Director of Research to establish and oversee the scientific programme. The first research vessel was Captain Scott's first expedition ship DISCOVERY. Cruises were centred on the whaling grounds of South Georgia and the South Shetland Islands.

Source: South Georgia Post.
From British Antarctic Terr. Post web-site http://www.oxforddnb.com/public/lotw/1.html



British Antarctic Territory 2001 80p sg?, scott? 1998 35p sg287, scott?
South Africa Standard Post 1999, sg? scott?
South Georgia and Sandwich Islands 2015 5p sg?, scott?
Attachments
tmp111.jpg
Discovery.jpg
SG1112
SG1112
tmp1B7.jpg
2015 South Georgia.JPG
Last edited by aukepalmhof on Fri Mar 20, 2015 2:27 am, edited 6 times in total.

aukepalmhof
Posts: 7151
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

Re: Discovery (Scott)

Post by aukepalmhof » Mon May 30, 2011 3:09 am

In April 1924 Hardy was appointed Chief Zoologist to the Discovery Investigations, which were established to assess the status and natural history of whale stocks in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. The expedition utilized Captain Scott’s first Antarctic vessel, RRS Discovery, which was refitted for scientific work (£1.15p stamp). The refit took longer than expected and Hardy used the time to help design the shore laboratory on South Georgia (Discovery House) that is still standing today. RRS Discovery eventually sailed from Dartmouth on 24th September 1925, arriving in Cumberland Bay on 20th February 1926.
For six weeks the vessel undertook scientific stations around South Georgia, collecting oceanographic data and sampling Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba; the main food of the whales and illustrated top left on the FDC) and other zooplankton. The work was conducted in sea conditions that were often extreme, making sampling arduous and dangerous. After a busy season RRS Discovery returned to Cape Town for the austral winter, returning in October 1926, when she was joined by another vessel, RRS William Scoresby. The two vessels were tasked with undertaking a survey of the whaling grounds off South Georgia and Hardy transferred to the William Scoresby, where he was the scientist in charge.
Following the successful survey of the whaling grounds, Hardy rejoined Discovery and sailed south for the South Orkney and South Shetland Islands. Here, in addition to midwater nets, they dredged the seafloor to investigate the diverse benthic (bottom) fauna of the Southern Ocean. The vessel continued south, along the Antarctic Peninsula, before returning across the Drake Passage to Cape Horn and north to Britain. Although Hardy took up an academic post in Britain, the Discovery Investigations continued on RRS Discovery II, resulting in 37 volumes of scientific reports as well as Hardy’s own popular account Great Waters, which was published in 1963.
South Georgia & South Sandwich Islands 2011 £1.15 sg?, scott?
British Antarctic Territory 1980 7p sg94, scott?
Source: http://www.falklandstamps.com/index.php ... Itemid=124
Attachments
tmp13A.jpg
scott-expedition.jpg
Discovery 1901.jpeg
Image (141).jpg

aukepalmhof
Posts: 7151
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

Re: Discovery (Scott)

Post by aukepalmhof » Mon Jan 18, 2016 7:26 pm

The British Australian (and) New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) was a research expedition into Antarctica between 1929 and 1931, involving two voyages over consecutive Austral summers. It was a British Commonwealth initiative, driven more by geopolitics than science, and funded by the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.
The leader of the BANZARE was Sir Douglas Mawson and there were several subcommanders (Captain K.N. MacKenzie, who replaced Captain John King Davis for the second summer) on board the RRS DISCOVERY, the ship previously used by Robert Falcon Scott. The BANZARE, which also made several short flights in a small plane, mapped the coastline of Antarctica and discovered Mac. Robertson Land and Princess Elizabeth Land (which later became incorporated into the Australian Antarctic Territory).
The voyages primarily comprised an "acquisitive exploratory expedition",[1] with Mawson making proclamations of British sovereignty over Antarctic lands at each of their five landfalls—on the understanding that the territory would later be handed to Australia (as it was in 1933). One such proclamation was made on 5 January 1931 at Cape Denison, the site which Mawson's Australasian Antarctic Expedition had occupied in 1912–13. A hand-written copy of the proclamation was left at the site, enclosed in a container made of food tins and buried beneath a cairn. The letter was retrieved in 1977 by an Australian Antarctic expedition, and is part of the Mawson collection at the National Museum of Australia.
The BANZARE was also a scientific quest, producing 13 volumes of reports, on geology, oceanography, meteorology, terrestrial magnetism, zoology and botany, between 1937 and 1975. Robert Falla was the assistant zoologist

French Southern and Antarctic Terr. 2016 0.44 Euro, she is also depict in the margin of the MS.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_A ... Expedition
Attachments
2016 TAAF DISCOVERY,, (2).jpg

aukepalmhof
Posts: 7151
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

Re: Discovery (Scott)

Post by aukepalmhof » Sun Apr 11, 2021 9:25 pm

2020 marks the 200th Anniversary of the discovery of the Antarctic continent, an incredible environment that is full of life both above and below the ocean.
The UK has a long and proud history in Antarctica and plays a leading role in protecting and studying the continent. The British Antarctic Territory forms the largest and most southerly of the UK’s 14 Overseas Territories. The UK’s claim to this part of Antarctica is the oldest of any made on the continent, dating back to 1908.
Our world-class science is conducted by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), who will soon be able to make use of the new polar ship RRS SIR DAVID ATTENBOROUGH – which some of you will know as Boaty McBoatface!

To celebrate the 200th Anniversary, a competition was run for children aged 4 – 17 years old to design an official postage stamp for the British Antarctic Territory. The design theme was “Discovering Antarctica”, with four lucky winners having their very own drawings featured on official stamps

£1.26 – Samaira Hasan, age 14
The judges agreed that Samaira’s design captured the history brilliantly, with good use of colour.
Samaira told us “My mother’s first-hand experience of visiting Rothera, the UK research station in Antarctica, helped me to appreciate the uniqueness and beauty of this continent which I wanted to portray in the design. During the Discovery Expedition, Scott, Wilson, and Shackleton were key crew members who demonstrated crucial characteristics including perseverance and resourcefulness which is why I wanted to illustrate their voyage. In the stamp, I drew the DISCOVERY Ship and the tethered hydrogen balloon that Scott took to the air during the expedition.”
What a journey that must have been for Captain Scott and his crew. Samaira is right that their efforts showed extreme resourcefulness and perseverance. Her depiction of Scott and his balloon conducting aerial reconnaissance stands the test of time. We still use this method today to monitor climate change and weather patterns in Antarctica.

https://britishantarcticterritory.org.u ... amp-design
British Antarctic Territory (BAT) 2020 £1.26, sg?, Scott?
Attachments
2020 Discovery-of-Antarctica-Bicentenary--Children-s-Art.jpg

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